Contributors

Prudence Mackintosh

Prudence Mackintosh's Profile Photo

Prudence Mackintosh is one of a circle of writers closely associated with Texas Monthly. She was a contributing editor from the magazine’s inception, in 1973, and her work has continued to appear in its pages for five decades. She gained a loyal following with her observations on social rites of passage for Texas women and her essays on the rearing of three boys. In 1976 she received a Penney-Missouri Award for excellence in lifestyle journalism. Her work has appeared in several national magazines and is anthologized in college writing texts. She is the author of four books: Thundering Sneakers, Retreads, Sneaking Out, and Just As We Were. She coauthored Great American Suburbs: The Homes of the Park Cities.

Born in Texarkana, Mackintosh grew up in the newspaper office of the Texarkana Gazette & Daily News, where her father was the editor and, for a time, her mother was a reporter, proofreader, and women’s editor. Her older brother became a television journalist. She attended Texarkana public schools and spent a pivotal summer at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. Her college summers were spent working in Washington, D.C., including a 1965 stint in the White House. She graduated from the University of Texas in 1966. Mackintosh lives in Dallas with her attorney husband. Their three grown sons now live in Dallas and Austin. For eight years (2010–2017) she taught a nonfiction writing class for liberal arts honors students at UT. She continues to write for Texas Monthly sporadically as a writer-at-large.

60 Articles

Children's Corner |
May 31, 1974

Games Small People Play

The games of yesterday are the memories of today. Here are a few bits and pieces on how to help your own child store up some memories.

News & Politics |
January 1, 1974

Briar Patch

THE DECLINE AND FALL OF LUNAR ROYALTYIT WASN’T EXACTLY ONE GIANT step for womankind, but from all reports this was one exploration NASA’s Director Christopher Columbus Kraft found not worth smiling about. Odds are that 1973’s Lunar Landing Festival Beauty Contest was not only the first such endeavor by NASA’s

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