Protecting Lone Star Lands and Waters

The Nature Conservancy has helped preserve one million acres of scenic beauty and nature in Texas.

In partnership with Hays County, TNC purchased El Rancho Cima Boy Scout Camp along the Blanco River. This area will eventually become a public park.

Photo by Christopher Zebo/TNC

Healthy lands and waters are essential for our state — and the key to a resilient future for people and nature. As Texas grows and prospers, protecting our natural resources will be critical for sustaining the health and wealth of our state.

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has been working with partners and supporters to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends since 1964 in Texas. For 60 years, TNC has worked collaboratively across the state to ensure that Texas’ treasured landscapes, rivers, wildlife, and ways of life don’t fade into lore and legend.

This year, TNC celebrates a momentous milestone: The protection of 1 million acres in Texas — and in a state where 95% of land is privately owned, that’s a big deal.

For more on TNC and its recent work, read these two stories from Texas Monthly: What Should Texas Do With $1 Billion for State Parks? and Empire, Wide and Glorious.

Protecting Iconic Texas

If you’ve ever scrambled to the top of Enchanted Rock, that massive speed bump of pink granite that rises from the Hill Country north of Fredericksburg, you’ve explored land protected by The Nature Conservancy in Texas (TNC).

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Under Our Terms

Prescribed fire offers many benefits to Texas land management, and the regenerative results of the burn will linger for years.

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Putting Nature to Work

How so-called “nature-based solutions” can put nature to work – and at the same time provide a place where humans can recharge in a beautiful setting.

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