Crucifictorious Returns In The ‘Parenthood’/’Friday Night Lights’ Crossover Webisodes

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When the news broke in December that the long-rumored Friday Night Lights movie (based on the much-beloved television series, rather than directly on Buzz Bissinger’s book) would not be happening, we celebrated the fact that the show’s protagonists would continue to live their lives only in our imaginations, where they could never disappoint us. 

Alas, we have bad news for those who enjoyed imagining a wonderful future for Lance Landry, Jesse Plemons's affably awkward kicker/frontman for "extreme grindcore with heavy thrash influences" band Crucifictorious. Landry's charm and smarts suggested he would achieve great things in his future, once he escaped Dillon and found a place more suited to awkward, affable young men without a smidge of talent on either the football field or stage—but, unfortunately, it appears that is not the path that he's taken, as Landry and Crucifictorious have returned in a new series of webisodes for NBC's Parenthood, which shares a producer with Friday Night Lights

In the first of the videos—watch it below—Landry and friends arrive, instruments in tow, at some coffeeshop or something that is apparently a location used in Parenthood, a show that we have heard is good but do not watch, much like most of America did with our beloved Friday Night Lights. Anyway, Landry, Devin (played by Austinite Stephanie Hunt), and the rest of the band show up at the venue, much to the chagrin of a young woman wearing an East Dillon Lions t-shirt who we will assume is a series regular on Parenthood

At the moment, only the first episode is up, so we are given no explanation for why Landry, a young man whose future held such promise, is on tour with his doomed grindcore band through empty coffeeshops in wherever-it-is-Parenthood-takes-place Berkeley, California. Perhaps after leaving school early to launch a wildly successful tech startup, Landry received a call from Devin suggesting that he needed to rediscover his creative edge, and they took to the highways as a way to reconnect? We're going to assume it's something like that, rather than Landry and friends chasing a futile dream with their crappy band for far longer than they should—at least until the future webisodes spell out something depressing. 

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  • Amanda

    Could this article be any more pointless? Come on, Texas Monthly. You could at least read the Parenthood Wikipedia page.

  • Allison

    This webisode would make a lot more sense to the article’s author if he actually watched Parenthood. Maybe he could have found a friend who did, before blindly guessing about what was happening here. And for the record, it’s a great series – just like FNL was.

  • Kelso

    I couldn’t agree more Allison. Parenthood is an incredible series and FYI the luncheonette is a recording studio not a coffee shop.

  • Jami

    This “article” doesn’t seem exactly up to Texas Monthly standards. If a writer would like to comment on things they don’t adequately research and snark out without having all the facts, perhaps redirect them to a personal blog instead of a news magazine.

    • Jed

      actually, i think you’ve put your finger on the new editorial style at TM.

      all political articles, for instance, are now required to end with an obligatory, “and someone really oughtta give that some thought” … presumably because, (a) the author hasn’t, and (b) that someone would then be able to explain why the article was worth writing/reading in the first place.