Brian D. Sweany

Brian D. Sweany was named editor in chief at Texas Monthly in July 2014. He began his career in journalism as an intern at the magazine in 1996, and before being promoted, he was a senior executive editor in charge of Texas Monthly's political coverage. Born in Richardson and raised in Plano, Sweany earned a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the University of North Texas, in Denton, and a master’s degree in English literature from the University of Texas at San Antonio. Sweany has also worked as an assistant professor in the journalism department at Ithaca College, in New York, and as a senior editor at D Magazine, in Dallas. He is active in a number of civic and volunteer organizations, including serving on the board of the Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism at UNT and being named a Next Generation Fellow by the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at UT-Austin. He lives in Austin with his wife, two children, and an ever-growing manuscript for The Kingdom of the Saddle, a biography of Charles Goodnight to be published by Penguin in the spring of 2015.

Stories

Election History

A visit from the ghost of elections past.

The Next Four Years

Free advice for Greg Abbott, the new governor of Texas.

Nothing But Net

Andrea Valdez and the making of our digital identity.

Kate the Great

Katharyn Rodemann, Barça, and the making of a great issue.

Turning the Page

Brian D. Sweany on taking the reins at Texas Monthly—and always carrying a pen.

Editor’s Letter

The indefatigable Pamela Colloff.

Steve Patterson, UT's New Athletic Director, on Student-Athletes Profiting From Their Name and Likeness

In a preview of our September cover, Patterson says college players shouldn't be able to monetize their famous names.

Texas, My Texas

My favorite place.

The Senator From San Antonio

Leticia Van de Putte on what happened last summer—and what might happen in November.

The Perry Files

Sizing up our five-time cover boy.

Face to Face With Rick Perry

A frank conversation about the accomplishments and the missteps over a fourteen-year gubernatorial career—from tort reform to his executive order on HPV—with the man who can claim the longest, and most powerful, tenure of any governor in Texas history (and also what’s next in 2016).

A Summer Weekend at Palo Duro Canyon

A father-daughter duo chase history in Texas’s grand Canyon.

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Stories