Jan Reid

Jan Reid is a former senior editor at Texas Monthly and has contributed to Esquire, GQ, Slate, Men’s Journal, Men’s Health, and the New York Times. An early article about Texas music spawned his first book, The Improbable Rise of Redneck Rock. Among his ten books are a well-reviewed novel, Deerinwater, for which he won a Dobie-Paisano Fellowship; a collection of his magazine pieces, Close Calls,Rio Grande, a compilation of choice writing and photography on the storied border stream; and The Bullet Meant for Me, a reflection on marriage, friendship, boxing, and physical and emotional recovery from a deadly shooting in Mexico.

Stories

Showdown at Maverick Ranch

With bulldozers poised to plow through their family’s historic spread, three San Antonio sisters are waging war against the state department.

Armed and Considered Dangerous

The only thing scarier than facing a great pitcher is facing a hothead like Roger Clemens.

Texas Primer: The Runaway Scrape

In early 1836, after the fall of the Alamo, a small episode in Texas history revealed an aspect of our character we’d just as soon forget.

Compadres De La Revolucion

Though the leaders of Mexico’s revolution all lived short and violent lives, a handful of those who rode with them have survived to a ripe old age in Texas.

The Meanest River

Yes, it’s muddy, it’s treacherous, and it smells bad enough to gag a skunk; but it’s also the only thing between us and Oklahoma.

C. W. Post

At first he couldn’t stand the strain of trying to get rich. Then he couldn’t stand the strain of being rich.

Texas Primer: Ma Ferguson

She unmasked the Klan and worried about the role of women, but she listened more to her husband than to the suffragettes.

Texas Primer: The Fire Ant

Baby Calves, children, even the agriculture commissioner: no one is safe from this tiny deamon.

Bring ‘Em Back Alive

In darkest South Texas roam two of the world’s most endangered species—the black rhino and the Great White Hunter.

A Grand Canyon

In 1541 Coronado and his troops stumbled upon a huge canyon in the midst of grassy plains and gazed upon it with awe. Journeying down into Palo Duro Canyon on mules 443 years later, I began to understand why.

Out of Action

He was an aggressive cop with one of the toughest beats in Dallas. But after fourteen years and another killing, the department took him off the street and slapped him behind a desk.

Gambling on the Gamblers

Jerry Argovitz made himself unpopular with NFL management as an abrasive player’s agent. Now that he owns Houston’s new football team, he finds himself on the other side of the table—and the issues.

Texas Primer: The Open Container

Texans are sometimes driven to drink.

Passing the Bucks

Football recruiting makes the NCAA see red, but SMU sees orange.

Passing the Bucks

Football recruiting makes the NCAA see red, but SMU sees orange.

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