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Dick Reavis

Dick J. Reavis is a former staff writer at Texas Monthly. He has written about motorcycle gangs, undocumented immigrants, guerrillas, convicts, coal miners, security guards, and banks for publications as diverse as Soldier of Fortune and the Wall Street Journal. He is a professor in the English department at North Carolina State University. 

Articles by Dick Reavis

The Recount

Aug 31, 2006 By Dick Reavis

Mexico in 2006 may not be Florida in 2000, but there are at least two similarities: The final results of its closest-ever presidential election are taking pretty long to determine. And however it comes out, a lot of people are going to be unhappy.

Can Vicente Fox Save Mexico?

Dec 1, 2000 By Dick Reavis

His election was historic for many reasons, not least because he embodies the stifled hopes of generations of his countrymen. Still, the obstacles he faces when he assumes the presidency on December 1 are considerable. Will he be able to deliver?

What Really Happened at Waco

Jun 30, 1995 By Dick Reavis

Just as congressional hearings are set to begin, an exclusive excerpt from a new book casts a different light on the government’s role in the fiery end to the siege at Mount Carmel.

The Lost Pyramids

May 31, 1990 By Dick Reavis

An intrepid explorer searching out Mayan ruins in the Yucatan remains undaunted, despite the language, the unkind elements, and other tropical afflictions.