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Could Lupe Valdez (or Oprah?!) Be The Key to a New Texas?

The two campaigns have launched—kind of. Both are long shots to have any real effect on the state.

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Valdez: photograph by Alex Wong/getty; Winfrey: photograph by Paul Drinkwater/NBCUniversal via Getty

During her run for Texas governor in 1990, Ann Richards invoked the theme of bringing about a New Texas, where cronyism and good-old-boyism were things of the past and women and minorities could take the reins of power. She was 55 when she ran, and the last time a woman had won the governor’s office was the year that Richards was born, in 1933. “I know what it is like to find the door closed to you,” Richards told a church congregation on the Sunday before the Democratic primary. “Not because of the color of my skin, but the fact that I was born female.”

Richards won the governorship that year, but her vision of a New Texas lasted just a single term; she lost re-election to George W. Bush four years later. Republican Kay Bailey Hutchison also won statewide election as treasurer in 1990 and went on to serve almost two decades as one of the state’s U.S. Senators. The number of elected women grew in the intervening years, but today, women still only represent a quarter of the elected officials in America.

This year, a record number of women are running for office in Texas. Most have jammed into crowded Democratic primary contests, and many of the candidates will never reach the general election where most Texans vote. But on Sunday, two women launched campaigns—kind of—that could have a significant impact in Texas. Former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez officially announced as a Democratic candidate for governor, and the calls for Oprah Winfrey to run for president in 2020 officially began.

Valdez’s formal campaign kick-off was not unexpected. She had announced her intent to seek the Democratic nomination and challenge Governor Greg Abbott months earlier, and while she may not be the favorite for the nomination, she’s definitely a serious contender. Valdez grew up in San Antonio, the daughter of migrant farm workers from Mexico. In 2004, Dallas County voters elected her sheriff, making her the first openly gay candidate, and the first Hispanic woman, to win that office in the state’s history. She’s also the only one of ten Democratic candidates running for governor who has won a major election.

Like Ann Richards, Valdez turned to the New Texas theme in her Sunday speech in Dallas:

Our children are crammed in overcrowded classrooms. Working Texans need a raise. Our roads and bridges need serious investment. And our healthcare system faces uncertainty. Yet, the special interests in Austin continue to cook up fake issues behind the curtain.

You remember the Wizard of Oz, where it was all a charade. [The state’s leaders] have made up issues—bathrooms, sanctuary cities, massive voter fraud, Jade Helm. It would be amusing if it wasn’t causing so much harm, costing us jobs, and certainly destroying the Texas brand.

Ya basta. Enough with the hate and the bickering. We need to build something new. A new Texas.

If Richards in 1990 was an underdog, Valdez will have to tunnel out from a cave to reach the Governor’s Office. Richards had the obstacle of running as a woman, but the state still leaned in favor of Democratic candidates. While she could never match the spending of her opponent, millionaire Republican Clayton Williams, Richards never wanted for a lack of financial resources. Plus, Richards was nationally known from her keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in 1988. Valdez does not have the luxury of either.

Winfrey, on the other had, has been a national celebrity for decades. Her speech at the Golden Globes ceremony on Sunday, as she accepted a lifetime achievement award, prompted an outcry for her to run for president in 2020. By early Monday, some news organizations were reporting that she was seriously considering it. But could Oprah translate her celebrity into a presidential campaign as Trump did?

A survey conducted by Public Policy Polling last March found that Winfrey had a 49 percent positive favorability rating nationally, and, if an election had been held then, she would have defeated Trump with 47 percent of the vote. Clinton, of course, defeated Trump with 48 percent in the popular vote, but Trump still won the White House through the Electoral College. Trump also won three states that had been carried by Obama—Florida, Ohio, and Michigan—in no small part because African-American voter turnout was down.

But an Oprah for President campaign in 2020 could make the Democrats competitive in both the popular vote and the Electoral College and could help some down ballot candidates in Texas. Statewide, African-American voters typically account for a little over twelve percent of the total voter turnout. In 2008, President Obama received 98 percent of that vote, but he still lost the state. The African-American vote in Texas has dropped steadily since, and it fell by 3,000 votes between 2012 and 2016.

There are almost three million African-Americans living in Texas, primarily in Harris County, the DFW area, and along the Interstate 35 corridor from San Antonio to Austin. So while a Winfrey candidacy is not likely to turn the state any more than Obama did, she could help Democrats carry the urban counties, and perhaps Fort Worth and Tarrant County for the first time in years.

This article has been updated to reflect the following correction: Lupe Valdez has, in fact, made the ballot for the Democratic primary.

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  • BCinBCS

    Comrade Trump inspires the Republicans and Oprah inspires the Democrats. That’s no reason for either of them to be president. Ability to inspire does not mean ability to govern. Let’s elect someone with strong political experience, someone who knows how to get things done in government, someone who can deal with Senators and Representatives, someone who has pondered public policy most of their adult life, someone with domestic and foreign policy credentials.

    Just because she can give a great speech does not mean that she would be a great president. Remember, she brought you Dr. Phil and Dr. Oz so her judgment isn’t always good. Ronald Reagan, Comrade Trump and Oprah are entertainers. We don’t need to be entertained by the president so please, no more celebrities.

    • donuthin2

      But that requires that we, the voters, become thinking people again. How likely is that?

    • anonyfool

      Not to mention Oprah’s endorsement of The Secret which was basically secular prosperity gospel with a book instead of a Joel Osteen figure.

  • José

    It’s natural but regrettable that most attention is paid to the top races. There will be a lot of interesting activity in the Congressional, state legislature, and local elections. I was asked to support a friend of a friend who is seeking the opportunity to challenge an incumbent GOP Congressman. There are seven (!) folks already registered in the Democratic primary, and most are reasonably qualified people. This year could well lay a solid foundation for the future.

    • anonyfool
      • José

        Imagine that, politicians who care more about policy issues and party affiliation. Wonder if it will ever catch on.
        You have to like the concept of a pragmatic bloc of legislators who avoid aligning themselves to a caucus but instead seek results. A few folks like them control the overall agenda. Sweet.

      • Maggie

        Goog-l-e is payin-g- $97 per hour,w-i-th weekly p-a-youts.Y-o-u can a-l-so avail this.O-n tuesday I got a brand new Land Rover Range Rover from having earned $11752 this l-a-st four weeks..with-o-u-t any doubt it’s the most-c-o-mfortable job I have ever done .. It s-o-unds unbelievable b-u-t you wont forgive yourself if you don’t check it!ax40u:➜➜➜ http://GoogleNetJobsDesignsEasyTechJobsOpportunities/easy/jobs ♥♥d♥d♥d♥♥♥a♥♥♥z♥♥m♥♥z♥g♥♥b♥♥♥q♥x♥♥w♥j♥♥♥j♥♥♥e♥♥♥b♥♥♥a♥d♥♥n♥♥♥b♥r♥♥n♥♥b♥♥♥m♥r:::::!be622p:lhuhu

  • Well, What Next?

    Winfrey 2020!

  • Kevin Schmidt

    Oprah has a 49% approval rating as a TV celebrity, which is not very good. As a politician, that would be cut in half, and already has. Bernie Sanders supporting progressives say she is a neoliberal, and that means they will never vote for her, unless of course, she gives them all new cars. LOL

    • anonyfool

      I can’t believe this article touts 49% as something positive. It’s only good when compared to Trump at 36-38% and Clinton at 34% now.

      • etg

        Trump is polling in the high 40s now. People actually like having real jobs rather than being enslaved to government hand outs. Amazing how that works!

  • WUSRPH

    Whenever I hear talk about how a candidate race or sex can draw voters to the polls I think of the “Dream Ticket” that John Sharp put together to insure that he would win his second race for lt. governor in 2002. Whenever someone talks about Richards I also remember that she was a “minority governor” who did not receive a majority of the votes and ran behind the rest of the Democratic ticket, other than Jim Hightower who ran virtually no campaign, in 1990, Her victory was helped by suburban, normally GOP women, who crossed over to vote against the “good ole boy” and his sexist attitudes…..but they were not there four years later. Being a women and a minority (particularly a Hispanic) can help you win the Democratic Primary in Texas (it is almost assured in Travis County) but winning the General Election requires a much broader appeal……Jose is right that we should be paying more attention to–and putting more of our effort into–those down the ballot races where there is a real chance of party building.
    ……

    • anonyfool

      A Get Out the Vote effort that worked with Latinos/Hispanics would turn the tide but my gut is Lupe Valdez is not the candidate/issue to do that. The solid GOP vote we saw in Alabama for a pedophile/racist in Alabama’s special election in November shows that there’s a sizeable percentage of voters we should just write off as unsalvageable.

    • donuthin2

      As I remember, Richards lost to Bush in part because she placed too many of her cronies in major appointments that created a bureaucracy so cumbersome that big business was frustrated because it took so long to get things done. It was as much a “good ole boy” administration as any.

      • St. Anger

        Richards lost to bush because she was a democrat right when all of Texas decided to become republicans. It didn’t really matter what she did.

        But as I experienced it, she lost my vote when she tried to “triangulate” to the
        center and abandoned the left wing. Sound familiar?

      • Donald Baker

        When she vetoed concealed carry in Texas, that sunk her reelection efforts.

  • UnknownUser76

    She will never make it.. The dems will throw her under the bus round 2 of a female Obama will not happen or help them

  • Kozmo

    Folks thinking Lupe or Oprah are going to change Texas politics or elections are living in cloud cuckoo land, frankly.

    • etg

      Correct!

  • anonyfool

    Your Energy Department posting needs to be updated with the rejection of coal/nuclear subsidies to revive the industry as being not justified. The fact that half of the coal plants affected by the recent winter storms went down immediately didn’t help matters.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/08/regulators-reject-rick-perrys-plan-to-prop-up-coal-and-nuclear-plants.html

  • WUSRPH

    Will he or won’t he and, if he does, will it be under oath?

    As you may have seen today, Trump is declining to say whether he would agree to an interview with the special prosecutor and is calling on the GOP in Congress (once again) to “take charge” of the investigations of his Administration and campaign and, he suggests, close them down.

    Of course, Bill Clinton talked to the prosecutors under oath but that was only about whether he had lied when he said “I never had sex with that woman”…..not whether you conspired with a foreign power to change the outcome of our most important national elections, tried to hinder the investigation of possible illegal acts and/or you or some of your family may have been involved in some money washing….as seems to be a topic of growing interest.

    (Here is a list of the times presidents have testified since Gerald Ford. https://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/081898clinton-testify.html )

    If course, if Trump agreed to testify it might present a real problem since he seems to have so much trouble with what others consider “the truth”…….(or, as one poster from Arlington, used to liked to excuse it with his “exaggerations”). (BYW, the Washington Post’s running tally of apparent deliberate lies or major misstatements of fact by Trump during his term is up over 2,000 now.)

    We haven’t had a sitting president indicted for lying or anything else so far in our history….but Trump likes to claim he is something totally new….so maybe it might be possible. Some claim that a president cannot be indicted….one of Nixon’s lawyers even tried to claim that a president cannot commit a crime while he is in office and one of Trump’s lawyers made a similar suggestion….but most folks think that question was settled at least in English common law when the English parliament rejected the old “the King can do no wrong argument” when it tried, convicted and executed Charles I. Prior to that, only a King’s ministers could be tried…..

    We have, however, had two impeachment trials—the first Johnson and Clinton—since there is no question about whether a president can be impeached. But, I doubt the GOP would impeach Trump for anything less than totally insane behavior.
    w

    • SpiritofPearl

      Prediction: When the outcry becomes too loud, the Game Show Host will consent to a take-home exam not under oath which his attorneys will complete for him.

      • WUSRPH

        Any attorney who would let Trump testify live and under oath should be disbarred. It would clearly be such bad representation that he could get any conviction reversed…..He might get away with written by sworn answers…..but, of course, he may think he is such a “stable genius” that he can get by actually being questioned.

        • SpiritofPearl

          I agree, but a take-home exam is a copout in my book. If he gives sworn written answers, I assume he’s as culpable as if he testifies in person.

          • WUSRPH

            Any written testimony, sworn or not, would be drafted by his lawyers and only signed by him…..

          • SpiritofPearl

            But does such an instrument have the same legal consequence as live testimony?

          • WUSRPH

            Lying under oath on a public document is legal offense.

          • donuthin2

            I think it best if they dropped the idea of requiring him to testify before allowing him to do the take home to be written by his attorneys. I doubt that he would read it before signing.

      • SeeItMyWay

        Funny. I actually laughed. Good one.

        • SpiritofPearl

          “A fella loves to be with a funny girl . . .”

          —- Fanny Bryce

    • donuthin2

      Best outcome for the country would be for the R’s to lose control of the house or senate in 2018 and neuter Trump, then have him to decide not to run in 2020 or if he does get soundly defeated. One side of me would like to see impeachment, but the other side of me suggest it would be better for the country to just move him out through the election. And btw, I don’t think article 25 has any legs, at least unless something happens to his physical health that incapacitates or unless he goes completely bonkers mentally.

  • WUSRPH

    Saw “I, Tonya” yesterday. It is not one of those movies that will make you whistle “Happy Days are here again” as you leave the theater, but you should enjoy. There is also a long interview/article with Tonya in today’s NY Times.

    • SpiritofPearl

      I have Tonya Burnout from the past.

      • St. Anger

        Me too. Zero interest in that movie.

    • SeeItMyWay

      Always looking back, with an occasional failed prediction of the future.

      • BCinBCS

        JJ: “Always looking back…

        Man, JJ, what do you have against history? One can learn a lot from history.

  • John Bernard Books

    Dems changing the world one bounced check at a time…
    “Demetria Smith, a Democrat who had hoped to challenge Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in the 2018 gubernatorial race, will not appear on the ballot.

    Smith, who attended a San Angelo forum for candidates in the Democratic primary Monday evening, was listed ineligible on the Texas Secretary of State’s website. Glen Maxey, primary director of the Texas Democratic Party, said Tuesday that Smith’s check for a $3,750 candidate filing fee had bounced.”
    http://www.gosanangelo.com/story/news/2018/01/09/would-democratic-challenger-texas-governor-ineligible-after-check-bounces/1017296001/

  • SpiritofPearl

    Another deceit by the Game Show Host and Mike Dense:

    https://www.indystar.com/story/news/local/2018/01/10/carrier-plant-lay-off-215-workers-thursday/1021745001/

    Hoosier taxpayers now foot the bill.

  • WUSRPH

    We heard a lot last year, particularly from one poster, about how Texas big business was so unhappy with the state’s current leadership—particularly with Gov. Abbott and Lt. Gov. Patrick—that they were going to unite against them….At one point he were even given a direct prediction that they would finance a race for governor or lt. governor by Texas House Speaker Joe Straus…..Funny how none of that worked out. It is even funnier that every day when you look in the news clips you find another statewide business pack endorsing Abbott or Patrick for re-election. Today it was the Texas Assoc. of Manufacturers endorsing Patrick. I guess that special insight that we were given turned out just a little bit wrong or premature. One can only hope that big business follows thru on what was always the more logical course by investing in the contested races for the Texas House and Senate.

    • SeeItMyWay

      Their was no chance for Straus to file and run by Nov 11th, and I never suggested he would this next election cycle. You must have missed his addressing this issue. He said he would not run for Lt Gov down the road but left all other options open. He also made reference to a closer relationship with Texas business and their beginning to fight back by supporting alternate candidates. There are several. There has also been a guy appointed to head up the development of a PAC to counter Empower Texans with Texas businesses supplying most of the funding. This takes awhile to put together, just like their grassroots development did. We shall see.

  • WUSRPH

    I am sure glad that the Trump Administration (sic) does not appear to take the fiscal costs of things into account when it makes a decision….Like on the decision to throw out all those temporary (20 years or more) Haitians, Salvadorians, Hondurans, etc. I’m sure the Social Security Trust Fund can afford to get by with the more than $6 billion it is estimated that it will not receive because they will no longer being making contributions…and what’s a little over $48 billion drop in the national gross product…….Of course the several hundred thousand US citizen children they may leave behind may have a little to say at the ballot box about all this.

    • BCinBCS

      Plus add in all of the money invested in educating DACA kids and their social security contributions that Comrade Trump also wants to send out of the country.

  • BCinBCS

    JJ and I have recently been going back and forth about the worth of a college education. I will be the first to say that a college education is not for everyone but for some, it should be.

    Recently, a Colorado legislator explained on a talk radio show that it would be dangerous to pass a tax on the production of greenhouse gases to reduce CO2 emissions that scientists attribute to global warming. Republican state Senator Jerry Sonnenberg cautioned:
    (bold is mine)

    So, you know, when we talk about carbon dioxide and those type of things, actually, those are important to agriculture and to the balance of nature. Trees and plants use carbon dioxide to create oxygen. It’s part of their process. And it’s nature’s way to make things work. So I guess my argument to those enviros that want less carbon is, ‘Here, you want to kill all the trees and plants’.
    (smh)

    https://www.rawstory.com/2017/12/republican-lawmaker-reducing-carbon-emissions-will-kill-all-the-trees-and-plants/

    • SeeItMyWay

      My only comment is this…a college education is not what it used to be, yet costs umpteen times more than a few decades ago. Diminishing returns. More would have one if it did not cost so much…and my argument about the haughty attitude many have about the lack of intelligence and garnered knowledge of those without one by those who do just helps widen the divide and increase the animosity.

      • BCinBCS

        I think that you are seeing something that is not there. Most of the commenters that have college educations do not hold it over those that don’t. The do point out the absurdity of some of the grossly uneducated comments made by many fly-by posters. They do this, not because the person is uneducated but because the comment is so ill informed or, sometimes, so dumb. Correlation is not necessarily causation.

        • SeeItMyWay

          I see the same absurdities coming from people with PhD’s. The fact that you do not take them to task on occasion tells me something.

          • BCinBCS

            About whom are you referencing? If we are having a discussion and someone states something that I know is wrong or that I believe to be inadvisable, I speak out, regardless of their education level.

          • SeeItMyWay

            Sorry, just don’t remember that happening.

          • BCinBCS

            You don’t remember what happening…me not contesting a PhD’s incorrect statement or you not remembering who you were referencing?

          • St. Anger

            He is judging you based on whether YOU have objected to things HE thinks are wrong.

            Good luck with that. I really don’t know why you bother.

          • BCinBCS

            I really don’t know why you bother.

            Even though I disagree with a lot of what he believes, there is a core with which I can agree. We see common problems. It is the solutions were we disagree. And, the disagreement on the solution to these problems has very little to do with education.

          • St. Anger

            Well except that his willful ignorance is probably why he left college just one semester short of a degree.

            It certainly wasn’t due to fiscal sense.

          • WUSRPH

            Actually, the way he explains it he left college because he had already learned all he thought he could from drinking with his buddies in the fraternity house.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Students leave college abruptly for numerous reasons. Let’s keep an open mind.

          • St. Anger

            Except he’s told us why. Open mind doesn’t mean failure to observe factual info.

          • SpiritofPearl

            What “he” says and what really happened may not corroborate. Having worked with college students for significant parts of my career, I speak from experience.

            I myself quit college after three years because I realized my chosen major was not what I enjoyed. I was also paying my own private school tuition. The difference is that I learned in my late twenties what I truly loved, so went back to college and achieved a better outcome.

          • SeeItMyWay

            Thank you. I did change majors and I was going to a very expensive private university…Southwestern U. My Dad was a retired Navy Chief. My Mom worked for Texas Instruments. We did not have much money. I did not have a car, I worked during the school year and during the summer months. I was a bored, unmotivated student. I was offered a job selling Farege Cologne & Cosmetics to retailers with a nice salary and new company car. I never looked back, and not having a degree never affected me because I started working for myself at age 27. I have read books all my life, and if I find something I am really interested in, I am compulsive about learning all I can about it. My interests have been broadbased and this has allowed me to confidently pursue business opportunities in varied fields. The latest is a patented water distillation system which we are in the throes of selling to several interested parties for oilfield production water clean-up and to more economically desalinate seawater and the the trillions of gallons of brackish water sitting underneath us. We are almost there. My name is one of four on the patents. We built the initial small prototype on a trailer in my garage workshop. I have no regrets about not getting my degree, nor do I feel like I cheated myself, nor do I feel intellectually inferior to some bookworm with all sorts of degrees and no practical knowledge. Jed is a prime example.

          • St. Anger

            Say what you like. I find it laughable for him to denigrate those with college educations when he has one, too.

          • SpiritofPearl

            He didn’t graduate.

          • St. Anger

            Are you intentionally missing the point?

            Guy who went to college for 3.5 years makes fun of elitist eggheads who went to college.

          • SpiritofPearl

            “Not all who wander are lost.”

            Knock it off with the ad hominem arra ts.

          • St. Anger

            You must be joking.

            Physician heal thyself. (For example, I have never once referred to someone’s weight on this site. You?)

          • SpiritofPearl

            Specific purpose in mind. It worked.

          • BCinBCS

            Pearl: “I myself quit college after three years because I realized my chosen major was not what I enjoyed. I was also paying my own private school tuition. The difference is that I learned in my late twenties what I truly loved, so went back to college and achieved a better outcome.

            Pearl, I did exactly the same thing. I left college for five years and then returned starting a new major.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Interesting. Why do some of us return and others do not?

          • BCinBCS

            Personal circumstances, probably.

          • SpiritofPearl

            I worked as an academic advisor for four years. Students drop out for numerous reasons: homesickness, bad romances, financial problems, academic failure, mental and physical health problems, sexual assaults, family illness or deaths. One student wanted to quit because of a fire in her apartment.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Poor high school biology education is the problem. It starts much earlier than college. My son managed to escape college biology.

          • BCinBCS

            I don’t think that it takes a biology class to know that plants and trees existed long before industrial pollution. A state senator, at least, should know that.

          • SpiritofPearl

            My point is that most students learn about photosynthesis in h.s. biology class, not college.

        • St. Anger

          I will say that when someone scoffs at higher education and then demands that our society bend over backwards to save their unskilled job … I am not terribly sympathetic.

        • WUSRPH

          Some of the smartest people I know have not had any college education…..just like some of the most illogical people I know have PhDs……But when you add an incomplete education, a refusal to accept anything but what you believe, rejection of the scientific method and a simple and simplistic approach to all questions—as a certain poster does—it makes for some very, confused comments.

        • WUSRPH

          You forgot when Ronald Reagan said trees were the enemy in causing too much pollution.

          ..
          https://www.bing.com/search?

          q=ronald+reagan+trees+cause+pollution&form=IENTHT&mkt=en-us&httpsmsn=1&refig=09b54298f86a4a6ddc3d40411944aa6a&sp=2&ghc=1&qs=AS&pq=ronald+reagan+trees+&sk=AS1&sc=7-20&cvid=09b54298f86a4a6ddc3d40411944aa6a

          • BCinBCS

            Yea, I had forgotten about that.

            That makes me wonder…
            Of those that have degrees, what degrees do Republicans have and what degrees do Democrats have? I realize that with advanced degrees both mainly have J.D.’s (lawyers) but what about undergraduate degrees?

          • St. Anger

            You are forgetting mba’s.

          • SpiritofPearl

            And ketchup is a vegetable . . .

        • etg

          Oh please – liberal left wing post-grad holders constantly talk about how Republicans are lower IQ and stupid. Meanwhile, the DNC can not win an election without the support of the large plurality of high school dropouts, welfare queens, and convicted felons who support the DNC. That’s the truth. The DNC is an amalgamation of the super-elite smug post-grad and the super-dumb uneducated high school dropout. That’s the truth.

          • St. Anger

            So when liberals insult you, it is smug, but when you insult us, it is the truth?

  • WUSRPH

    Another group of candidates NOT to support:

    ENDORSEMENT WATCH

    Young Conservatives of Texas this morning released its third round of
    endorsements in Republican primaries for the Texas Legislature, backing seven
    lawmakers for re-election as well as 14 challengers and open-seat candidates:

    HD-83: Rep. Dustin
    Burrows of Lubbock

    HD-132: Rep. Mike
    Schofield of Katy

    HD-70: Rep. Scott
    Sanford of McKinney

    HD-129: Rep. Dennis
    Paul of Houston

    SD-25: Sen. Donna
    Campbell of New Braunfels

    SD-5: Sen. Charles
    Schwertner of Georgetown

    SD-7: Sen. Paul
    Bettencourt of Houston

    HD-4: Stuart Spitzer, who’s running for the
    seat being vacated by Rep. Lance Gooden, R-Terrell

    HD-9: Garrett Boersma, who’s challenging
    state Rep. Chris Paddie, R-Marshall

    HD-18: Emily Cook, who’s challenging Rep.
    Ernest Bailes, R-Shepherd

    HD-23: Mayes Middleton, who’s challenging Rep.
    Wayne Faircloth, R-Galveston

    HD-25: Damon Rambo, who’s challenging Rep.
    Dennis Bonnen, R-Angleton

    HD-47: Jay Wiley, who’s challenging Rep.
    Paul Workman, R-Austin

    HD-64: Mark Roy, who’s
    challenging Rep. Lynn Stucky, R-Denton

    HD-98: Armin Mizani, who’s
    challenging Rep. Giovanni Capriglione, R-Southlake

    HD-106: Jared Patterson, who’s running for the
    seat being vacated by Rep. Pat Fallon, R-Frisco

    HD-107: Deanna Metzger, who’s challenging Rep.
    Victoria Neave, D-Dallas

    HD-113: Jonathan Boos, who’s running for the
    seat being vacated by Rep. Cindy Burkett, R-Sunnyvale

    HD-122: Chris Fails, who’s challenging Rep.
    Lyle Larson, R-San Antonio

    HD-127: Reginald Grant, who’s challenging Rep.
    Dan Huberty, R-Houston

    SD-31: Mike Canon, who’s challenging Sen.
    Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo

    • Donald Baker

      All excellent candidates that I support

  • BCinBCS

    Our stable, genius president demonstrated his genius by sending out a tweet of alarm against renewal of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). During one of his many “Executive Time” breaks, he was watching Fox News when he saw an opinion piece urging him not to reauthorize the act. Being the last opinion that he had heard that day on the matter, Comrade Trump immediately came on board. Unfortunately, it is his administration’s policy to renew FISA. It wasn’t too long before his handlers explained to him that it was their policy to renew the bill so the stable genius had to pushed out another tweet, this time supporting it.

    True story.

    • BCinBCS

      The humor writer Andy Borowitz remarked about the FISA mess:
      Based on the FISA fiasco there’s a decent chance that a confused Trump will eventually call for his impeachment.

  • WUSRPH

    He also added to his continuing list of racists insults in referring to foreign countries….It is just too bad we didn’t have strict immigration rules back when Trump’s grandfather on one side and his mother on the other came over. I am certain that we would never have left in a draft dodger like his grandfather and we already had enough maids so that she offered no skills we needed.

    • Donald Baker

      His description of some foreign countries is accurate.

      • St. Anger

        Scum

    • SpiritofPearl

      Grandpa Trump carried the Bone Spur mutation.

  • WUSRPH

    When Trump sends all those new fancy F-52 fighters to attack Korea….I hope he can remember which one he means.

    • St. Anger

      It doesn’t matter since the planes are fictional anyway!

      • BCinBCS

        Wadda ya mean? F-52’s are the escorts for B-52’s. They’re so advance, stealthy and secret that no one has ever seen one. The fact that no one has ever seen one proves their existence. ;-/

        • BCinBCS

          As Slipstream commented on another blog that I read:
          It was a rogue pilot in an F-52 who was responsible for the Bowling Green massacre.

  • Donald Baker

    Women who are left wing deluded loons will not be elected to any statewide office in Texas. On the other hand there are intelligent conservative women I would vote for, ones who rely on facts and logic rather than feelings and emotions at the expense of facts and reality

    • St. Anger

      Who cares?

  • SpiritofPearl

    Sad to say, the feelings aren’t reciprocal.

    • SeeItMyWay

      Crushed.

      • SpiritofPearl

        Have a beer.

      • BCinBCS

        Crushed.

        You have to admit, you walked right into that one. :-/

        • SeeItMyWay

          Jeeeezzzz

  • SpiritofPearl
    • etg

      Claims of the GOP’s death have been ongoing for 20 years from the left. Yet we are now in another GOP controlled government. Mother Jones is reliable news to you, while Breitbart is fake news right? Leftists are so smug.

      • SpiritofPearl

        I didn’t say I believe Mother Jones is reliable, but David Corn from MJ was the guy who reported Mitt Romney’s unfortunate “47%” tape that helped him lose the election. Breitbart isn’t just wrong. It’s propaganda. Drink your fill of it. We are coming.

  • WUSRPH

    Of course, back in the 19th Century the original “America First” folks, then known as “Know Nothings” (as they should be again today) considered all the following areas of the world “s…hole countries”:

    Ireland, Italy, all of Eastern Europe, Asian, Spain, Mexico, all of the Middle East, South American, Africa, India, China, Japan, etc.,, etc. and all Jews and Catholics……but today Trump seems to have narrowed the list down so that it only covers people who are Muslims and/or have a different skin coloration than his.

    • BCinBCS

      …BREAKING NEWS…BREAKING NEWS…
      Comrade Trump is a racist leading a largely racist political party.
      (Just thought that you would want to know.)

  • WUSRPH

    Another noteworthy “Texas Brag”:

    Houston Chronicle – January 11, 2018

    Texas has the most contaminated water in the country, according to new report

    Texas has the most contaminated water in the country, according to a new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG). This finding was included in a report claiming more than 170 million Americans in all 50 states have been exposed to radioactive elements in their water. The report includes analysis EWG claims it conducted of public water systems in the U.S. from 2010 to 2015. EWG’s report claims that Texas has the most widespread contamination affecting more than 3,500 utilities serving 22 million people. The contamination included detectable levels of radium-226 and radium-228.

    • BCinBCS

      Is that from naturally occurring radium or from contamination? I suspect it is from natural rock sources.

      • WUSRPH

        Probably natural sources….especially in the old uranium mining areas in South Texas.