Big 12

UT and A&M Resume Hostilities This Weekend

Jan 21, 2013 By Jason Cohen

If you thought the rivalry between the University of Texas and Texas A&M was currently on ice, you are correct. Tonight in College Station, the two schools face off in, you guessed it, hockey. 

The Little 10

Jan 20, 2013 By Paul Burka

I’ll give the new conference a fifty-fifty chance of lasting four years.

Farmers Flight!

Oct 31, 2011 By Paul Burka

Texas A&M’s announcement that it was bolting the Big 12 for the SEC signaled the end of a passionate rivalry with the University of Texas that has defined the two schools for more than a century. But what does the end of Aggies versus Longhorns mean for the rest of us?

Ch-Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes

Oct 31, 2011 By Jake Silverstein

Later this month, one of the great long-standing traditions in college athletics—the annual Thanksgiving game between the University of Texas and Texas A&M—will come to an end. The rivalry between these two schools has lasted so long, and fostered such ferocious passion on both sides, that most people…

Mark his words: Cuban on the Big XII

Sep 8, 2011 By Paul Burka

Mavericks' owner Mark Cuban has a very smart blog on what the Big Twelve should do if A&M leaves. It was published several days ago and has been picked up by other sports blogs. * * * * Here is some unsolicited advice to the Big 12. As you might expect coming from me, it’s going to be contrary to what everyone else thinks they should do. With Texas A&M trying to leave the Big 12 (It doesn’t happen until the SEC accepts them) every remaining school is trying to decide in the immortal lyrics of The Clash “Should I Stay or Should I Go”.  The quick answer ? They should stay. Why ? The first reason is that the Super Conferences that are forming or being considered will turn into a huge mistake. No if ands or buts about it. While the concept of a Super Conference sounds incredibly cool , the reality is that the larger than 12 school conferences will only invoke the law of intended consequences and will create the following problems: 1. More schools will NOT mean more TV money. The big college TV networks, Fox, ESPN, CBS pay for quality, not quantity.  They need marquee matchups that are “Must Tweet TV”.  The number of schools in a conference actually reduce the parity and quality of match-ups in a conference. The networks will not pay up for that.  Adding Texas A&M to the SEC is not going to add a single dollar’s worth of value to the owner of the SEC TV contract , regardless of sport.  Maybe the SEC has an escalator in their contract that increases the total value of the TV contract, but I’m guessing that it still will result in a reduction in the dollars paid to each school when compared to the amount paid had an additional school not joined the conference. 2. Fans will hate the scheduling impact You know how there is midnight madness in college basketball ? And late night and games scheduled at weird times for basketball ? Get ready for morning madness in college football as well.  I’m guessing that the only way to get all those games through a single TV network partner is to start very, very early or to go very very late. OR to move games to online broadcasts.  Which is exactly why the big networks are very supportive of the Super Conferences. They know they will be able to force matchups OFF of tv and on to internet based broadcasts. You can pass your own judgement if that’s good or bad. 3. Say Goodbye to Cupcake Football Games As a big college football fan I see this as a positive. But if you talk to any coach with BCS aspirations, they will tell you that this is a huge negative. Sure Utah State can take Auburn to the wire every now and then, but the reality is most BCS title aspiration (not all) schools have 3 or 4 cupcake games on their schedule. With every school added to a conference they are going to have to remove a cupcake to make room on their schedule. Coaches are going to HATE this. Of course the smaller schools are going to lose their pay day as well.

Baylor: “will assert legal remedies if necessary”

Sep 7, 2011 By Paul Burka

(This post is a revision that includes corrections from a previous draft.) Regarding the situation with Texas A&M and the future of the Big Twelve Conference, I have spoken with persons familiar with the situation at Baylor, who prefer to remain anonymous. This is what I have learned. 1. The university started four weeks ago to determine its legal remedies if A&M decided to leave the Big Twelve for the SEC. Astonishingly, the Big XII had waived all of its rights in a letter to the SEC, although Baylor's position, which seems correct to me, is that the Big Twelve cannot bind its member institutions. 2. If it is necessary to resort to litigation, one theory would be tortious interference with contract. 3.  The Baylor board has taken the position, "We're not going to waive our remedies." 4. Baylor is talking to all member institutions of the Big Twelve. UT and Oklahoma say they want to continue in the conference. At least two other conference schools have said they will not waive their rights. 5. Not surprisingly, politicians have gotten involved, including (reportedly) a number of legislators and a few statewide officials, including David Dewhurst,  who would like to leverage the controversy to get the University of Houston in the Big Twelve.

SECession?

Aug 31, 2011 By Jason Cohen

Texas A&M is fixin' to get out of the Big 12. Good news for Texas?

A&M’s plans — and UT’s

Aug 31, 2011 By Paul Burka

I spoke with a friend yesterday who is knowledgeable about the situation at Texas A&M, and here is what he had to say. 1. Perry was not involved in the A&M regents’ decision to leave the Big Twelve for the SEC. He was described to me as “not supportive” but…