Anne Dingus

Anne Dingus, a former senior editor for Texas Monthly was born in Pampa in 1953 and is a freelance writer living in Austin.

Stories

War Games

In the suddenly trendy world of World War II wannabes, these Texans are big guns.

Dove Shoot

Ten years after the filming of the miniseries Lonesome Dove, screenwriter Bill Wittliff shares his photographic memories of life on the set.

Searching for Santa

This time of year, Yule find him hanging around East Texas: On lawns and roofs, he’s a Claus célèbre.

El Circo

As in Hanoi and Moscow, the circus in Mexico is no three-ring extravaganza. It’s one of the grittiest shows on earth.

Performing Arts • Jo Long

Culturally centered.

Literature • Angela Shelf Medearis

Doing the write thing.

The Way We Wore

From buckskin to polyester, a look at 166 years of Texas fashion that doesn’t skirt the issues.

Range Rover

After fifty years of traveling the Southwest, ranch photographer Frank Reeves left behind a vast body of work and unforgettable portraits of the cowboy’s way of life.

Brentfield Elementary

With a private-school atmosphere, involved parents, and a veteran principal and faculty, this Richardson school makes the most of its many blessings.

¡Bravo!

A new exhibit in San Marcos pays homage to Manuel Alvarez Bravo, the grandfather of Mexican photography, and the generations of fotógrafos who followed his lead.

Her Three Sons

For the Wilsons of Dallas, taking pictures was a family affair. Today the mother is a successful photographer and her boys are hot Hollywood commodities. Here’s a look at Laura Wilson’s personal album.

Buckle Up

The rodeo belt buckle is prized by cowboys and collectors alike. By the look of these handcrafted samples, it’s easy to see why.

Where the Wild Things Are

One of the country’s top photographers traveled around his home state to capture these stunning portraits of exotic animals on display.

The Last Picture Shows

A loving look back at nine grand old movie houses from the golden age of small-town Texas.

Hi-Ho Daddy-O!

From dancing frogs to towering cowboy boots, a look at how Bob Wade’s outlandish sculptures became Texas landmarks.

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