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Latinos Won’t Turn Texas Blue Anytime Soon

Growing Latino vote may be years away from deciding statewide elections.

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Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images

For the past twenty years, Texas Democrats have entered every election saying demographics are on their side. They’ve been hoping that the state’s burgeoning Hispanic population will carry the party back into power. If the 2016 election loss of Democrat Hillary Clinton in Texas proves anything, it is that the state’s Latino vote is less the Sleeping Giant than a growing adolescent who has not yet come of age. And probably won’t anytime soon.

Last fall I reported that there was a surge in Texas of about 530,000 Latinos who had registered to vote amid the anti-Mexican, build-a-wall rhetoric of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. That registration increase apparently played a major role in the spike in Latino voters who showed up to vote in Texas last November. About 395,000 more Latino voters went to the polls than did in the 2012 presidential election. But it was still far too little to make a difference for Democratic candidates statewide. That trend—increasing numbers of Latino voters, but not enough to help Democrats win consistently in Texas—seems likely to continue for the next few elections cycles.

The caveat to that is whether President Trump’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants might motivate a group of voters who usually don’t vote, no matter the ethnicity: young voters. A Pew Research Center report estimated that 32 percent of the 2016 eligible Hispanic voters in Texas were between the ages of 18 and 29. Because the great migration of undocumented immigrants from Mexico to Texas occurred before the year 2000, that means many of these young voters were born here and are citizens even if their parents or older siblings are undocumented immigrants fearful of deportation. Trump’s hard-line immigration policies could prompt these youthful voters to flock to the polls next year.

Short of that kind of sea change, Texas Republicans can feel confident of holding the advantage in statewide elections for years to come. Non-Hispanic whites may constitute just 43 percent of the state’s population, but in 2016 they represented more than 65 percent of all the votes cast, according to state voting results provided to me by the Legislative Council. And Anglos gave about 69 percent of their votes to Trump.

To get an idea of how much Hispanic voting will have to grow to offset the white vote, consider this: If the Spanish surname votes of Bexar County, Corpus Christi and all the counties of South Texas and along the Rio Grande to El Paso were added together, they would account for almost half of all the Spanish surname ballots cast in 2016. However, all those ballots together are still outnumbered by the votes cast by whites just in three heavily Republican counties combined: Collin, Denton, and Montgomery.

While Hispanic voting was at its highest level ever in 2016, it was an incremental increase to 19 percent of the total turnout, up from 17 percent in 2012. The long-term demographic trends favor Hispanic voting strength over white voters, but at last year’s level of increase, it would take about two more presidential election cycles to close the gap between Republican and Democratic votes. But elections for governor and most other statewide offices occur in off years, and the gap is even wider. The number of Hispanic votes cast in the past two off-year elections was almost stagnant, increasing only by 14,500 from 2010 to 2014. The Republican advantage in the 2014 off-year elections was close to a million votes.

One thing that might make a difference is a major voter registration drive. The state’s Hispanic population is estimated at 10.4 million, but there were only 4.8 million Hispanics eligible to vote last year, according to Pew estimates. After children too young too vote and non-citizens are winnowed out of the population, Hispanics only make only up 28 percent of the eligible voters. The Texas Secretary of State’s office reported that there were about 3.5 million Spanish surname registered voters in 2016, so the 1.7 million turnout accounted for close to half of all the registered Hispanic voters. But that means more than a million eligible Hispanic voters are still not registered to vote.

Matt Barreto, a University of California Los Angeles political scientist and pollster with Latino Decisions, told me that if Texas Democrats want to increase voter turnout, they first need to increase voter registration. “You’re never going to get a humongous increase unless you get a humongous increase in registration,” he said. “That’s the first thing that needs work in Texas: voter registration drives in the big cities and the Valley.”

Barreto, who has been an expert witness for the Texas Democratic Party in redistricting cases, said the state party also needs to encourage more minority candidates to run for statewide office—even if the prospects of winning are not good. “They won’t all win. A lot of them will run and lose. That’s how you turn a state. You run and lose. That will bring more people into the system. … If you don’t think the system cares about you, there’s almost nothing we can do to get you to vote.

“They need to be encouraging candidates who look like the future of their party to be running for every single office. That will eventually lead to a belief among the voters that the party actually cares about them. If you look up and every year you just have more white candidates running, it creates an idea that the party doesn’t care much about you.”

In fact, the last two Democratic Party nominees for governor were white—former Houston Mayor Bill White in 2010 and former state Senator Wendy Davis of Fort Worth. Barreto said Davis never fully connected with Latino voters and in some San Antonio precincts that are heavily Hispanic, Davis was out voted by Democratic Lieutenant Governor candidate Leticia Van de Putte, a Latina.

A test that may be brewing involves Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, who will stand for re-election next year. Cruz appears vulnerable after his failed 2016 presidential campaign and reluctance to endorse Trump for president. He’s mostly vulnerable to a Republican primary challenge. However, he likely will also face a challenge in the general election from either Joaquin Castro of San Antonio or Beto O’Rourke, with a base in heavily Hispanic El Paso. Both are current members of the U.S. House. Cruz is of Cuban heritage, while Castro is Mexican-American.

The greater likelihood is that the growing Hispanic vote will affect local elections first, as they did in Houston last year.

Harris County had the biggest spike in Hispanic voter turnout in 2016. The county saw 73,000 more Hispanic voters than in 2012, and the percentage of the vote grew from 16 percent to almost 20 percent. (For comparison, the number of Spanish surname voters in Bexar County increased by 45,500 over 2012; Dallas County, 33,000 votes; and Travis, about 17,000; even very Republican Tarrant county had an increase of 20,000 Spanish surname voters.)

University of Houston political scientist Richard Murray said the impact of Hispanic voting in Harris County could be seen in how poorly Trump performed there. He received 40,000 fewer votes than 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, while Clinton gathered 120,000 more votes in the county than Obama. “Trump’s weakness with urban Hispanics hurt the Republican ticket badly as one can see from precinct level data from Harris County,” Murray said. “That wiped out all down ballot Republicans, despite the fact that the most reliable Democratic voters in Harris County, African Americans, turned out at only about 90 percent of their 2012 vote.”

OK, now, every time journalists write about the growing Hispanic vote and the Democratic Party, the instant response is that not all Latinos vote Democratic. And that’s very true. Latinos who live in predominantly Anglo neighborhoods tend to vote like their neighbors. Wealthier Hispanics are more likely to vote Republican. But Latinos predominantly vote Democratic. How much so is often a point of dispute, and one reason is that exit polls get it wrong.

The first time I really encountered the exit poll problem was 1998, when George W. Bush won re-election as governor, claiming an exit poll showed him receiving half the Hispanic vote. The television networks’ Voter News Service said Bush had won 49 percent of the Texas Hispanic vote. However, exit polls by the William Velasquez Institute set Bush’s margin at 39 percent. In effort to settle the question, I used the Texas Legislative Council’s redistricting computer to look at 180,000 votes cast in 426 urban precincts that had a Hispanic voting age population of more than 70 percent. The result was that Bush received 39 percent of the vote. The big difference, my study was based on tens of thousands of actual votes while the television network’s exit poll was based on interviews with a mere 201 Hispanic voters.

Barreto told me the big problem with using exit polls to tell you much of anything about Hispanic voting in Texas is that the exit surveys usually are set up in swing precincts because the networks are more interested in calling a race than giving an accurate demographic picture of an election. Barreto said in 2014 there were no exit polls south of San Antonio and the surveys were only done in English.

That prompted me to take another look at the 2014 exit polls that showed Governor Greg Abbott receiving 44 percent of the Latino vote over Davis, and U.S. Senator John Cornyn capturing 48 percent. Looking at mostly Hispanic counties of South Texas, it appears that Abbott’s real Latino vote probably was somewhere between 25 and 35 percent. (If anyone knows of a more accurate precinct level study, please let me know.)

A pair of political scientist, Francisco Pedraza and Bryan Wilcox-Archuleta, in a recent Washington Post article challenged the notion that Trump received 34 percent of the Latino vote in Texas. In a study of 4,372 precincts across Texas covering 75 percent of the state’s Hispanic population, they determined that Clinton had won 77 percent of the Hispanic vote to Trump’s 18 percent—very different from the exit polls that showed the results at 61/34 percent.

(For those who want to challenge my analysis or explore further, click here for the 2012/2016 spreadsheet. SSTO means Spanish Surname Turnout. TO is Total turnout of all voters. The Spanish surnames are compiled by the Secretary of State’s office from a list of common surnames in the United States. And, of course, it is possible for someone to be Hispanic and not have a Spanish surname.)

The bottom line is that Democrats will continue to benefit disproportionately from increases in Hispanic turnout, but barring a major change in current trends, it won’t be enough to turn Texas blue for years into the future.

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  • WUSRPH

    Where Hispanics may make a more immediate impact is in local races and state representative districts. The GOP will make every effort it can to keep them pinned up in guaranteed Democratic districts….just as the Democrats did to the Republicans in the 60s and 70s and into early 80s when they controlled the drawing of district lines…but the sheer numbers of Hispanics will mean that at least a handful of districts now held by Republicans will likely turn Democratic after 2021. There would probably be even a greater effect is the Voting Rights Act were still in force and if the Dept. of Justice were in Democratic hands—which may be the case in 2021 should Trump be only a one-term president. However, you are correct about the statewide effect.

    • anonyfool

      How does Texas compare to California, in that California used to be solidly red and due to demographics among other things, and turned solidly blue except for low population rural areas.

      • r.g. ratcliffe

        Proposition 187 turned California Democratic almost overnight. But California had a large population of native born Hispanic citizens who were not registered to vote. They registered and voted. In Texas, almost half the Latino population is too young to vote. Among adult, Hispanics, something like 25 percent are foreign born, indicating many are probably not citizens. That’s why the Pew estimate I included in the story indicates that only about 4 million of 10 million Hispanics in Texas were eligible to vote in 2016, with voter registration about a million below that and turnout about two million below the eligible voter number.

        • anonyfool

          Thanks for the very complete answer. So what you are saying is, Texas just needs to let the legislature pass something similar to Prop 187 in a couple of years. 🙂

          • José

            That would require an act of stupidity on the part of the state lege. Hee hee!

          • anonyfool

            Insane is more how the current lege is acting in my opinion, so nothing is off the table.

  • John Bernard Books

    What is a hispanic? Is that similar to a South Asian? These are made up demographics.
    Those who speak Spanish are far more likely to vote for a conservative than a socialist. They left their country to get away from that crap…..

    • broz0rs

      … and conservative policies are trying to drive them out of this country

      • John Bernard Books

        How by giving them jobs and opportunity? Not everyone is lazy or entitled.

      • David Ol

        Drive who exactly. I have roots in Latin America and nobody’s trying to drive me out. At least 30% of us know what you are trying to do. Anyone who cares to read about history can identify this from a mile away

      • SpiritofPearl

        Get back when you have to pay $10 for a tomato or $100 for a small cheese pizza.

    • David Ol

      Identity politics are only good for those who want to grab power or those who want to live for free. They fund white nationalists to push poor and ignorant minorities to vote for their degenerate agendas

      • wessexmom

        Congrats—You’ve officially lost ALL credibility with that crap! Who’s your source? Alex Jones?

        • BCinBCS

          Welcome back Mom, good to see you commenting again.

  • KingPurple

    I’d like to know how those additional numbers actually break down, I’d bet that not as many hispanics voted democrat as you would think. I’m in the construction trade in southwest Texas and out here it’s hard pressed to find a Mexican worker in the trades that approves of illegal immigration or even expanded legal immigration. There’s some companies that seem to employ quite a few undocumented people and those companies are despised for it including the local Hispanic population. I’m not for sure how any of them voted but on the topic of immigration, most of them are hard liners with no respect for non legal immigrants

    • tracy Smith

      Liar!!!

      • KingPurple

        No I’m really not, I see it everyday. Been in construction for 20 years which in my area of the state is predominantly Hispanic as in 70-80% and you can ask any of them what they think about illegal immigrants and they will start cussing at you. Now of course that’s just word of mouth and might not be how they actually feel, that’s why I was saying that it’d be nice to see how the voting actually broke down instead of generalized numbers

        • SpiritofPearl

          Here in Austin many, many construction workers were AWOL on the “Day Without an Immigrant.” The Statesman had a survey a few years ago which indicated that 80-85% of construction workers in Texas were immigrants and, of that number, about 50% were undocumented.

          • KingPurple

            I disagree with 80% being immigrants, most that I see everyday are American born, parents might have been immigrants. In my neck of the woods, undocumented workers are estimated to be about 20% in the construction industry and they are very disliked. What has been interesting though is the growing number of Ugandan and Burmese born workers

          • SpiritofPearl

            My point is that opinions are irrelevant. Accurate data are what’s important and a state-funded study several years ago indicate that a high percentage of construction workers in Texas are undocumented.

      • David Ol

        He’s not lying. Most people of Hispanic origin with a stable career oppose immigration of non professionals from Latin America. They affect us enormously. It’s the usual non hispanic suspects who push for this.

    • David Ol

      El Paso is communist.They complain about racism but they refuse to learn proper English. They disparage against Anglos but they voted for Irish populist illegal immigration pusher Orourke. In El Paso, those who call the shots are Republican but those who deal with the people, who are mostly Hispanic, are communist. We have to come together and stop this.

    • r.g. ratcliffe

      I haven’t seen a poll broken down this way since the 1990s, but in the old Texas Poll, you used to see that among native born Hispanic men age 40 and over, about 45-48 percent would say they supported tougher immigration policies. But if the issue, became about Mexicans, their support dropped dramatically. Because these are county-wide numbers, I can’t give a breakdown like I might if I had precinct level data. But in heavily Hispanic counties, the vote remains overwhelmingly Democratic.

      • David Ol

        Because illegal immigration is heavily Hispanic.There’s nothing in our DNA that makes us prone to communism. You’re trying to make a point based on flawed logic.

      • KingPurple

        The age of the typical construction worker has increased dramatically in the last 10-15 years or so which might explain the disapproval of undocument workers and the 45-48% that you mentioned.

  • WUSRPH

    I only rarely make a direct prediction, but I think I will this time……

    I predict that the Trump Administration will use the alleged probe of voting by illegal aliens in the presidential election to spur an effort to get the States to require that all registered voters reregister and provide proof of their US citizenship at that time in order to be allowed to vote. The maneuver will be justified on a claim that registration rolls in every state are inaccurate and that hundreds of thousands of non-citizens are included on those rolls. This effort will be pushed for passage in the legislative sessions closest to the next presidential election in order to shorten the time for people to reregister. Where successful (and Texas is a likely place) these new laws would require reregistration during the presidential election year. This would drastically affect the ability of the Democrats to get millions reregistered in time to vote plus result in numerous elderly and minorities being denied registration. That’s my prediction.

    • SpiritofPearl

      That legislation would be tied up in court for years before it would ever be implemented.

      • WUSRPH

        Of course it would be taken to court—-but with the 5th Circuit and the “new” SCOTUS plus a Jeff Sessions-led DOJ it might well be upheld as constitutional and within the state’s powers.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Purging voter rolls is not the same as a requirement to present proof of citizenship.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Poll taxes are unconstitutional.

          • WUSRPH

            Actually poll (or per head) taxes are perfectly constitutional. The only thing that is unconstitutional is connecting them to the right to vote. It is also constitutional to require that one be a citizens to vote. (It is not necessary, but the states are allowed to require it). You are already required to indicate whether you are a citizen on the application and lying is a crime. The only question I can see standing in the way of requiring proof of citizenship beyond your word is the possibility–as you suggest–that some court might call the cost of getting a copy of your birth certificate a poll tax. However, the state could probably sidestep that by making copies available for no charge and/or providing for some alternative way (say a baptismal certificate) for those who do not have birth certificates. That might still block a few otherwise qualified persons, but such a small number that the “New” SCOTUS might overlook it. The goal of this would not be so much to get non-citizens off the rolls but more to cause utter havoc and stress the Democratic Party’s resources to the ultimate. If we wound up with a million less registered voters in Texas it would just be icing on the cake.

          • John Johnson

            I agree wholeheartedly with your prediction, and you responses to “Maxine Waters'” comments.

          • SpiritofPearl

            The cost of paying for proof-of-citizenship paperwork would be burdensome for many Americans and thus will lose – in a sane Supreme Court – as a poll tax. I’ve been following this since Mitch Daniels swept voter ID into Indiana in 2006. A 93-year-old nun in South Bend lost her right to vote!

          • SpiritofPearl
  • Oscar Cavail

    Texas Republicans are in deep trouble. It’s been well known that relative to Hispanics in Florida, New York, New Jersey and California, Texas Hispanics simply have not registered. If they do its curtains for a Trump re-election. People seem oblivious to the fact that Republicans have only a single plurality of the vote since 1992. And they have only one majority since 1988. Obama had a majority twice…Trump won the electoral college because of a scant 100,000 votes in an election where 130 million voted. In 2012 House Republicans failed to win a plurality yet held onto the House because of Gerrymandering. In 2016 their plurality was barely 1% yet they took away nearly 10% more of the House seats. Republicans have not claimed a majority of all votes cast in either the House, Senate or the Presidency in nearly 13 years. In fact Trump underperformed Bush Jr.’s vote totals in nearly every rust belt state and all but a couple of the swing states. Remember…of the 13 swing states he only won 3 by 1% or less. Until today’s announcement by Comrade Trump to follow through with his 18th century nativist rhetoric in all my life I have never heard such Hispanic despise for any single Republican. If the Democrats run a Hispanic Vice President from South West a majority non-white electorare in Texas will be in your review faster than Trump can say Putin baby I love you.

    • anonyfool

      There needs to be a concerted effort by Democrats to get these guys to register and to vote and a polarizing event to motivate them to show up or nothing changes. I thought Hillary was an idiot to choose Tim Kaine and swing to the right with a running mate – a total misread of the places she narrowly lost.

      • John Johnson

        Wrong. Who would have been a better choice to keep crossover voters in places in the Rust Belt from voting for Trump?

  • BCinBCS

    What’s the story on Beto O’Rourke who, the rumors say, may make a run at Ted Cruz’s Senate seat. Anyone know him…anyone from El Paso?

    Maybe R.G. could do a story on O’Rourke and Castro (and anyone else who might challenge).

    • SpiritofPearl

      Beto has an Irish father and a Latina mother.

    • WUSRPH

      Check the front page of today’s on-line Washington Post.

  • John Bernard Books

    If you’re interested in seeing where the snowflakes will be falling….
    https://www.resistancecalendar.org/

  • David Ol

    I am of Hispanic origin. We must stop illegal immigration from Latin America now and only allow in more educated people from those regions.
    These people the democrats want to import are and will not be able to assimilate in large numbers. Assuming that there is an underclass of people who are fit to do the lowest jobs will end up breaking the country and affecting everyone.
    We must know and unveil those who are pushing for this illegal immigration. We know who they are. They are using us to rise to power just like they’ve done historically. It’s many times themselves who fund the white nationalist parties. Articles like this illustrate how dangerous these media owners are.Seems that to the author Ted Cruz is not even Hispanic. These international elements really think that people of Hispanic heritage are below them.

  • r.g. ratcliffe

    It has come to my attention that the link on the spreadsheet was not public. I will fix it later, but in the meantime: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-yNO-NGWnrbINLsABIRmK7jNgwVAACQy_0wsxzhpTno/edit?usp=sharing

  • WUSRPH

    Here’s a question for you:

    Since Trump now says he will not return non-Mexican illegal aliens to their native countries but, instead, will dump them on Mexico…..what happens if Mexico refuses to accept them, dumps them back or refuses to assist them? We could have a game of push and shove (of people) along the border. As I said yesterday on the prior thread, it sure reminds me of the time the Germans dumped 15,000 to 17000 Polish Jews into a no-man’s zone along the Polish border in 1938. The Administration keeps saying it is going to treat the people it rounds up “humanely”….but it has yet to show us how it interprets that word.

    • John Johnson

      I was once on a European business trip to London and then on to Paris the next day. I got out of DFW, and into and out of the U.K. with an expired passport. The French customs people picked up on it. They did not send me back to the U.S.; they put me on the next flight back to London, where they allowed me to go to the US embassy and get a new passport. It was a costly mistake. A day lost and a big chunk of $ for a round trip back to the U.K.

      Mexico allowed the illegals to transit their country, and allowed them to enter our country from theirs. Mexico knows how it works, and won’t like it, but that’s how it works.

      • WUSRPH

        It ain’t going to happen…..and, if it does, it will be both a humanitarian and public relations disaster for Trump.

        • John Johnson

          Says you. You have no idea whether he is talking about hairy legged individuals or mothers with kids from Central America. If he tries to dump the later across the border, I will raise hell with you.

          • WUSRPH

            HE IS TALKING ABOUT HUMAN BEINGS……

    • SpiritofPearl

      Mexico on Wednesday told the Trump entourage “no” to that plan. Their naivete and failure to understand the limits of their power is embarrassing.

      • WUSRPH

        “Poor Mexico, so far from God, so close to the United States” Porfirio Diaz
        Other people have pride in their country too. Mexico will not become America’s dumping yard.

  • Kozmo

    Meanwhile, on the Dawna Dukes Empty Chair Watch, what’s her absenteeism score this week?

    No kidding, I keep seeing her empty chair on local newscasts (KXAN and Spectrum in particular) about the lege. Someone from the press ought to be keeping a running tally of how much work this idler is missing.

    • WUSRPH

      Her absence from the daily House session at this point in the session is not that serious since the House is yet to do virtually anything of note…HOWEVER, what would be important is whether she is attending the meetings of the House Appropriations Subcommittees of which she is a member. That is where the work is now being done. It will be especially important that she not miss the Appropriations Committee meetings later in the session where it “marks up” the budget by deciding what to include in the bill.

    • SpiritofPearl

      My absentee rep . . .

  • John Bernard Books

    Naaaawwwww she didn’t….
    “And it could be that while unemployment and the economy worsens, he could have undermined the messaging so much that he can actually control exactly what people think,” Brzezinski said. “And that, that is our job.””
    https://news.grabien.com/story-brzezinski-our-job-control-exactly-what-people-think

    Dems are stupid…..you don’t get to control what I think.

  • John Bernard Books

    I love stupid dems…
    “Maxine Waters: I just think the American people need to know what is going on. This is a bunch of scumbags. That’s what they are. They’re all organized around making money.”
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/02/democrat-maxine-waters-calls-trump-cabinet-picks-bunch-scumbags-video/

    Waters used to post here using the pseudo name Indiana Pearl, I banned her for being stupid…..

    • John Johnson

      Hahaha! Good one.

      I watch and read about the protesters at these offweek congressional hometown meetings and cringe. It seems that these people have really learned to like a working single mom, like the nurse I recently read about, or the family of four with two working adults, subsidizing their healthcare.

      Forget the fact that these groups are having to drop out of the healthcare market altogether because (1) it is too expensive, and (2) with the high deductibles, they get nothing in return unless of a catastrophic occurrence.

      Want to see an uproar? Keep putting coverage for the poor on the backs of the middle class and the young. This group is waiting silently to see what Trump and congressional leaders come up with. They are showing patience…something these whiners who just suffered a terrible political defeat know nothing about.

      • WUSRPH

        The middle class has been carrying the cost of health care for the poor for years. in the form of higher property taxes to support charity care in the public hospitals and clinics. The ACA actually reduced…and did not increase that burden…….Ryan’s plan would put it right back on them. But your hate of Obama and anything he was involved with blinds you to reality.

        • John Johnson

          Geeez…if you were a 40 year old working guy with a working wife and two kids, and are paying for your own insurance, you might see things differently…but you aren’t, and never have paid for your own…so I would not expect you to understand.

          • wessexmom

            If you were one of the millions of 50+ somethings with a pre-existing condition (which included taking statins, suffering through one episode of gastritis in your life, having a baby—anything and everything that had EVER ailed you ) who were unfortunate enough to get laid off when W The Worst drove the economy off the cliff and forced to buy an expensive “individual” health insurance policy, which got cancelled the minute you tried to use it, YOU would definitely see things differently!

          • John Johnson

            My wife has Parkinson’s. We paid almost $1500 each month for a policy that covered the two of us, but the deductible was not way out of line. I once had a $20K emergency room bill during a period of time when I was not covered. Please don’t preach to me about your woes. Everyone has them. My gripe is a family of four paying more of a policy than they can afford… a policy with a mega deductible they will probably never meet… so that someone else can receive a subsidized plan. It’s not right. It is not working as promised or advertised, and it is rapidly dying because it was structured poorly. Obamacare will die on its own if Congress does not kill it first.

          • WUSRPH

            You seem to think that doing away with the government’s role in health insurance will bring some great transformation in the costs of insurance. It can only do that if we go back to not providing coverage for millions of people and limit coverage for the rest…..which Cruz and Ryan call “freedom” and which you apparently approve. As long as we use the insurance market, with its higher costs and profit demands, as the payer for insurance the costs will be high. That family of four will only benefit from a “public option” plan…..but we will not get that from the GOP.

          • John Johnson

            I don’t “seem to think” anything regarding health insurance; I know that the current system is terribly flawed and not working. I know that non-profit hospitals are anything but, that drug companies are colluding, and that allowing dermatologists to call a squirt of liquid nitrogen on a dry skin patch “surgery”, and to charge as if an actual type surgery had been performed, is criminal.

          • WUSRPH

            But you are willing (eager in fact) to junk the only system (ACA) that, at the present time, offers any hope of an improvement and allow Ryan and company to deny coverage in any but the greatest catastrophic condition to millions of Americans.

          • John Johnson

            That is exactly the way it is now. The high deductibles for the working family after making extraordinary high premium payments afford them nothing but a catastrophic policy.

          • BCinBCS

            All of the examples that you list, JJ, have nothing to do with Obamacare. There is the health care system (on which you commented) and there is the health insurance system. Please don’t conflate the problems of one as being caused by the other.

          • John Johnson

            Another goofy post from you. The two are indelibly joined.

          • BCinBCS

            Another misunderstandin of Obamacare, insurance and health care by you. Sure they are joined but each is not designed to dictate most of the policies of the other.

        • SpiritofPearl

          One of the long-term goals of Obamacare is to reduce the cost of healthcare in the U.S. Although the cost is still rising, the RATE of increase has been slowed which is a positive outcome.

          The medical professions and other healthcare providers got on board to make change. Now the primitives in the GOP want to go back to the Dark Ages. They prey on the weak-minded bubbas in their party who refuse to educate themselves about the economics of healthcare. In the final analysis, they are the ones most likely to suffer from their own stupidity.

  • John Bernard Books

    Are dems naz*s….
    “Yet at hundreds of campuses across the country, administrators encourage students to report one another, or their professors, for speech protected by the First Amendment, or even mere political disagreements. The so-called “Bias Response Teams” reviewing these (often anonymous) reports typically include police officers, student conduct administrators and public relations staff who scrutinize the speech of activists and academics.”
    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/students-rat-each-other-out-over-speech/article/2615405

    I’m gonna turn you in……

  • John Bernard Books

    Why don’t dems follow our laws…
    “State Rep. Ron Reynolds marks an unusual anniversary Wednesday: one full year without filing a single campaign finance report.

    On Tuesday, the state attorney general’s office sued the Democrat from Missouri City for failing to file reports on his personal finances or his contributions and expenditures.

    Reynolds, who won re-election to his Fort Bend County seat in 2016 despite multiple criminal convictions for illegally soliciting clients, owes $41,500 in fines to the Texas Ethics Commission for failing to file the required reports.

    That’s the highest fine on the commission’s delinquent filer list. The total includes fines for ongoing failures to file and could go higher if he doesn’t submit a report when the next deadline rolls around this summer.”
    https://www.texastribune.org/2017/02/22/state-rep-filed-zero-ethics-report-over-past-year/?utm_campaign=trib-social&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=1487769078

    Dukes and Reynolds making you dems proud….

  • John Johnson

    I agree with your take, as backed up by your research.

    I do see more and more Hispanics moving away from the Dem party as they establish themselves here in Texas, and as Texas Repub’s move more toward moderate conservatism.
    I see this happening now.

    When Cruz’s presidential run fell apart, due in part, to prominent evangelical leaders abandoning him, and the embarrassment TP elected like Patrick, Paxton and Miller have imparted on Texans, I see a big move back towards the middle.

    In fact, I think Joe Straus, could be the next governor. I cannot think of a better candidate.

    • John Bernard Books

      You and every dem in Texas

      • John Johnson

        Oh, come on…there is a reason Straus has not been unseated as Speaker. The TP does not have the votes, and they didn’t even try this round. The TP and Dunn shot their wad last session. We watched TP overreach and their obsession with red meat issues. Meanwhile, Rome burned.

        Texas is still red; just not as much TP red.

        • John Bernard Books

          He has a few repubs who kept getting defeated and a solid block of every dem. He is more dem than conservative.

          • John Johnson

            Not sure how you can say that.

            I think by now, after all these years, that you know me. I know you. We agree on most, disagree on some.

            Patrick is never going to advance above where he is. He has hit his high point; red meat issues will only carry one so far. He has reached his “peter principle”.

            No one in Texas is ever going to win statewide office again by being “crazy” conservative as was the case this last time around. That movement is dead.

          • WUSRPH

            Come on, JJ, be serious. Joe Straus may be a good speaker. He may even be a good public servant but he has as much of a chance of being the next governor as you do.
            He was elected Speaker under special circumstances and he can probably stay speaker for awhile or, perhaps, go to the Congress, but that is it. But a statewide office is totally out of sight. In theory, he might be able to win the General Election for governor but the sad reality is that he will never get there.
            Several reasons:
            First, his religion. The far right religious groups that play a prominent role in the Texas GOP Primary are not going to vote for a non-Christian for governor and especially one whose family is involved in gambling. It is a regretful reality, but it is just that—a reality.
            Second, his moderate politics (for a Texas Republican) are totally unacceptable to the many folks who listen to the MQ Sullivan’s, etc. They would spend multi-millions blaming him for every possible political sin known to man……and they have a strong voice in the Primary. Dan Patrick would join in that effort. Remember that Straus’s name is booed at the State GOP Conventions.
            Third, Straus is too smart of a man to submit himself to the embarrassment of making a race he cannot hope to win, especially if he has any hope of holding some office other than speaker.

            There would have to be a major revolution and change in the Texas GOP for someone like him to have a chance and, so far, you are the only person who even dreams about that happening. Maybe some day…..but not in 2018 or any year close to it. Sorry, but try to face reality.
            P.S. No Speaker has successfully moved up to a statewide office since Ben Barnes and that was in 1968 when he had the full and complete backing of John Connally.

          • John Johnson

            Mark this date, Professor…another absolute from you that I think I might be preparing you another crow to eat.

            Jewish? Christians love Jews these days. Remember how many said the Catholic Kennedy could never be elected?

            Dunn and his lackey are losing stroke. Big Business is taking note. They have been sitting back in a discombobulated fog for years with fractured and individualized viewpoints. No more.

            This bathroom bill is case in point.

            In Tarrant County, I promise you, a PAC of major corporations who Konni Burton has been railing about because of the civic/corporate “partnerships” it took to get them here, has not gone unnoticed.

            A study conducted by Smart Asset, some financial institution, picked Fort Worth and Arlington two of the top places to live. See link below.

            Elected officials who rode Cruz and his TP rhetoric to office days are numbered, and those who will vote against them hold no animas toward Jews.

            http://fb.me/3dzEh7Iko

          • WUSRPH

            But other studies picked the People’s Republic of Austin as the best place to live.]

            http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/news/2017/02/06/austin-is-no-1-on-prestigious-u-s-news-best-places.html

            You forget that Cruz won the Texas presidential primary by a fair margin……and that nationwide Cruz was out-Cruzed by Trump.

          • John Johnson

            I no longer have faith in any of your absolute positions. Your record of predicting sucks.

          • WUSRPH

            $1,000 says Straus never runs for governor. P.S. Have you given up on winning the $3,000 promised if you could prove you last misstatement of my position?

          • John Johnson

            I’m not a gambler except on occasion where business is concerned.

            $3,000 to rummage through your past posts? Forget it. I know what I would find…First a definitive statement; second, a moderated position; and third, something close to a total reversal. You did it when predicting about the Texas economy tanking, and you did it again when crowning Hillary before the first vote was cast…and that was after you spouted off about Trump having no change of winning the nomination.

            You are on a roll in the loss column, Professor. Why don’t you just sit back and watch for awhile?

          • WUSRPH

            The wager is specifically that you will not find any time that I in any way say that I disapproved of Truman’s use of atom bombs in 1945. Your claim that I did was a lie.

          • John Bernard Books

            Dan has repeatedly said two terms and he’s done. Straus is the worst kind of republican he thrives on power and believes you cannot cut spending but must raise taxes. He’s is mucho loco like McCain.
            I will not support that kind of illogical thinking. Cuts must be deep and immediate.

          • John Johnson

            Where you going to cut taxes? I hear this all the time, but nothing gets done. Blaming that on Straus is a joke, right?

          • WUSRPH

            Of course, the Legislature has cut takes in the last two sessions and will likely do so again this year. But those cuts have been too small for the likes of the Dunn’s and the Troll, to whom I presume that you are talking.. Where Straus goes wrong with them is that he will not slash and cut state services solely to meet some ideological goal. He has this idea that government should provide some basic services. They do not agree with that. He has not also not been willing to go along with Patrick’s plans to place a garrote around the fiscal necks of state and local governments. That makes him a bad Republican in their view.

        • WUSRPH

          You forget that Dunn and company picked up a couple of seats in the House AND the Senate during the GOP Primary….they are still on the march…..

    • donuthin2

      Joe Straus for next governor sounds like a great plan.

      • SpiritofPearl

        Better than many Texas Republicans . . .

    • BCinBCS

      …as Texas Repub’s move more toward moderate conservatism.”

      JJ, I know you are old enough to remember the moderate Republicans of the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s. Today’s Republicans of Abbott, Cruz, et.al. are not moderate.

      • John Johnson

        I thought that was what I was expressing.

        • BCinBCS

          I see no evidence of Texas Republicans becoming more moderate, not in the action of the state’s legislature or in the votes of the state’s conservatives.

          • John Johnson

            Then you aren’t paying attention.

          • BCinBCS

            Aren’t you sweet.

  • John Bernard Books

    This is why we don’t elect dems and need to downsize government…
    “The Social Security Administration paid $1 billion in benefits to individuals who did not have a Social Security Number (SSN), according to a new audit.”
    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/02/22/feds-paid-1-billion-in-social-security-benefits-to-individuals-without-ssn.html

    cut cut cut….

    • John Johnson

      We have no clue where money is going…in any department of government. Bring Tom Coburn back as the overseer.

  • lawrenceperson

    “In some San Antonio precincts that are heavily Hispanic, Davis was out
    voted by Democratic Lieutenant Governor candidate Leticia Van de Putte, a
    Latina.”

    Maybe so, but overall, Davis outpolled Van de Putte by about 22,000 votes. And both lost to Greg Abbott and Dan Patrick by some 900,000 votes.

    The Hispanicness or non-Hispanicness of Democratic candidates is not why they lose statewide, it’s the relentless drive toward extreme leftwing politics that has left them out of step with the Texas electorate. Faced with this fact, Texas Democrats have apparently not spent any time in self-reflection on what they’ve done wrong, but immediately leaped to the conclusion “Obviously we have to change the electorate!”

  • John Bernard Books

    Here’s how it works snowflake….
    ““They had their shot in the election, certainly had their shot in Kentucky, but in this country when you win the election you get to make the policy. I always remind people, winners make policy and losers go home.””
    http://hotair.com/archives/2017/02/22/mitch-mcconnell-winners-make-policy-and-losers-go-home/

    enough of the whining already…..

  • John Bernard Books

    MLK had it right….
    “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. Martin Luther King, Jr.”
    https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/m/martinluth115056.html

    Identity politics and a terrible candidate costs dems this election. The question isn’t will they learn….but can they learn?

  • John Bernard Books

    Perhaps you’re like WASSUP and ex-Speaker Pelosi suffering from dementia…or just plain stupid here’s a reminder:
    “1. Costs are exploding.
    President Barack Obama promised that his reform proposal would cut typical family costs by $2,500 annually. That, of course, never materialized.
    2. Competition and choice are declining.
    Obama told America his proposal would increase competition in the health insurance markets but that hasn’t happened either.
    3. Forget about keeping your plan.
    Perhaps the most famous health care promise of all, Obama’s promise: “If you like your health care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health care plan.”
    4. No, you can’t necessarily keep your doctor.
    Obama promised patients that they would be able to keep their doctors. For many patients, that also turned out to be untrue.”
    http://www.heritage.org/health-care-reform/commentary/4-broken-obamacare-promises-town-hall-protesters-should-remember

    I didn’t forget…..I voted for PRESIDENT Trump.

  • SpiritofPearl

    Moving to the middle – Breitbart’s alt-right philosophy is bad for business:

    https://www.axios.com/companies-nix-ads-on-breitbart-2278205212.html

    • Dunnyveg

      Pearl, even worse is Richard Spencer’s white nationalism. Spencer’s America would include open borders for any and all white people. All white nationalism has done is to replace the traditional liberal pipe dream of a brotherhood of man with a brotherhood of whites, which is still liberalism.

      The fact is that the second Klan organized specifically to stop the Ellis Island wave of immigration, which was almost exclusively white. Do we really want to repeat history’s mistakes?

      Humans are ethno-tribal animals. And no amount of liberalism is going to change that. As De Maistre said, he’s met Frenchmen, Englishmen, and Chinamen, but never mankind.

      • WUSRPH

        A “brotherhood” based on a single group (such as a nationality) or even an entire race (in this case Whites) is not liberalism. It is fascism. A liberal society would be open to all peoples no matter what nationality, religion or race. You need to study your “isms” more.

        • Dunnyveg

          Gosh, do I have your word of honor as a liberal that liberte, egalite, fraternite isn’t liberalism? Really?

          Fascism was the state at war with foreigners and minorities. Liberalism is the state at war with its own citizens and the worship of foreigners and minorities.

          So, as bad as fascism was, liberalism is even worse. Only rabid dogs and liberals turn on their own kind and destroy their own nests.

          • WUSRPH

            Please read a little political philosophy and theory. It might help you understand what you are incorrectly trying to say.. Liberte, egalite and fraternite are the basis for THREE DIFFERENT kinds of political systems…..Liberty is what this County was based upon where all persons no matter what race, etc. have equal legal protections for their rights but economic and social equality is not guaranteed. Fraternity or ‘brotherhood” is what a fascist movement is based on which limits its membership (and rights) to those of a select group, race or nationality. And equality is the basis of what today some call liberalism and its extremes of socialism and communism. It’s socialist and communist variations are a “internationalist” movement open to all humans in which, in theory, at least all people are equal in rights and wealth. Fascism is a “nationalistic” movement that proclaims the superiority of the selected group over all other humans.

          • Dunnyveg

            Really? What “three different kinds of political systems” are represented by liberte, egalite, and fraternite?

            If this country was based on liberty for all races, how do you explain slavery and the immigration act of 1790, more particularly described:

            “Alternately known as the Nationality Act, the Naturalization Act of 1790 restricted citizenship to “any alien, being a free white person” who had been in the U.S. for two years. In effect, it left out indentured servants, slaves, and most women.”

            As for fascism, anybody who believes their group is more important than other groups is a fascist?

            I hope I’m never as smart as you are.

          • WUSRPH

            If you read what I posted you would have the answer to your question but to repeat:

            Liberty is what this County was based upon where all persons no matter what race, etc. have equal legal protections for their rights but economic and social equality is not guaranteed. (Saying that we were a Liberty Society does not mean that we were perfect at it nor that we have always lived up to our declaration that “all men are created equal”. As you point out, we were not exempt from racist/sexist thoughts at the time…..and have on occasion had a Fraternity tint in our politics. What made us different in 1789 was that we came closer to the pure definition of a Liberty Society than anyone else and, in many ways, still are.)

            Fraternity or ‘brotherhood” is what a fascist movement is based on which limits its membership (and rights) to those of a select group, religion, race or nationality). Fascism is a “nationalistic” (or “nativism”) movement that proclaims the superiority of that selected group over all other humans.

            And equality is the basis of what today some call modern liberalism and its extremes of socialism and communism. It’s socialist and communist variations are “internationalist” movements open to all humans in which, in theory, at least all people are equal in rights and wealth.

            The US is perhaps unusual in that it started out as primarily a Liberty Society but has gradually over the years tried to incorporate some of the aspects of a Equality Society with, as I noted above, an occasional tint of nativism. There was a hint of our future move toward “equality” in the Declaration of Independence, but it was not implemented in the Constitution, which is a Liberty document.
            As to your never being as smart as I am. I cannot speak to your native intelligence but as long as you are so unwilling to study, learn, think and consider other thoughts you are probably correct.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Who is “Dunnyveg”? I seem to have blocked him/her.

          • WUSRPH

            Don’t know…..but she/he deleted two of his/her comments extending the claim that white supremacy was a form of liberalism.

          • José

            There are a couple of kids posting white identity / white homeland stuff on a thread in the Daily Post section. Can’t let that go unchallenged.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Perhaps sobriety was eventually achieved . . .

          • John Johnson

            In your household?

          • BCinBCS

            😉

          • WUSRPH

            Getting more and more like the Troll everyday….lay off the personal attacks, please.

  • John Bernard Books

    Dems win the sharp stick in the eye award….again.
    “Kellogg’s announced this week that it would pull advertisements from Breitbart News. The company fired back on Wednesday:

    Kellogg Co. announced on Tuesday its decision to pull ads from conservative media giant Breitbart.com because its 45,000,000 monthly conservative readers are not “aligned with our values as a company.” In response, Breitbart News, one of the world’s top news publishers, has launched a #DumpKelloggs petition and called for a boycott of the ubiquitous food manufacturer.
    Kellogg’s stock fell $1.04 to close at $70.96 per share. The combined two-day drop has been $2.66 per share, down 3.6% from $73.62 at the start of Wednesday trading.”
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-journalism/2016/12/01/kelloggs-stock-drops-another-1-44-end-thursday-trading/

    That answered the question…
    “The question isn’t will they learn….but can they learn?”
    as ex-Democrat Congressman Zell Miller said, “you can’t fix stupid.”

  • WUSRPH

    As you’ve seen, Trump had to postpone his “new, improved” ban on immigrants from those seven countries once again. It appears that they just cannot find a way to legalized discrimination against Muslims that even his lawyers think will fly. They can fix most of the rest of the grievous flaws in the first order—such as banning people who had a legal right to be in the US like green card holders and those with already approved visas–but they do not appear to be able to get by the “reasonableness test” when no person from any of the seven nations has been involved in a terrorist act in the US….while the nation’s that produced the terrorists (including those whose parents came from one of them) are excluded from the EO’s ban. They just keep trying to reach too far.

    • SpiritofPearl

      They also cannot overcome the true purpose – which is to ban Muslims.

      • John Johnson

        Maxine Pearl Waters, is the type of liberal who will prevent the Dem party from ever mounting a comeback anytime soon.

  • John Bernard Books

    The question has been answered…
    “Likely New DNC Chairman: White People NOT Entitled to ‘Equal Protection’
    Their choices prove that Democrats either learned nothing from Trump’s election victory. Or they fear doing anything about the Frankenstein they’ve created.”
    http://theblacksphere.net/2017/02/likely-new-dnc-chairman-white-people-not-entitled-equal-protection/

    When discussing dems these days the word stupid keeps surfacing….

  • WUSRPH

    What was that the Trump Administration said about treating the illegal aliens humanely?

    “ICE Agents Take Undocumented Mom With Brain Tumor From Hospital To Detention Center” (Huffington-Post)

  • SpiritofPearl
    • BCinBCS

      Pearl, I hope what you say is true but I don’t think that the power of the Freedumb Caucus has been taken into consideration. Their opposition to Obamacare amounts to a religious zeal and they will block other Republican initiatives until they get the repeal that is the main reason for their existence.

  • SpiritofPearl
    • WUSRPH

      Christ never liked hypocrites…..Mathew 23:27, Revelation 3:16……Francis’s views are the same.

  • WUSRPH

    Anyone have any thoughts on Trump’s backing off of the protection of transgender children? The result, of course, will be a different treatment and different rights from state to state, city to city and perhaps even school to school. That, of course, is just what the 14th Amendment was designed to remedy. (Assuming you know that most First Amendment Rights did not apply to the States prior to the adoption of the 14th Amendment but only to actions, etc. by the federal government.)

    • SpiritofPearl

      My childhood friend whose son is gay just spent an hour on the phone with me mourning the loss of humanity in the GOP.

  • WUSRPH

    Trying again to start a Texas issue discussion to make Jadedhaven happy:
    What about the fight between rural land owners (probably backed by the airlines) against the proposed high-speed rail between Houston and Dallas and ultimately from there to San Antonio and Austin back to Dallas? According to the Quorum Report rural legislators have filed more than 20 bills to thwart the plan—-primarily attacks on the company’s eminent domain rights. These same issues developed when Rick Perry was pushing his Trans Texas Corridor system which never got off the ground. There was a similar effort back in the early 90s but it never got off the ground (partially because of the opposition of Southwest Airlines). But this time the Super Train idea seems to have some real financial sources plus is likely to be looked upon kindly by the Trump Administration as part of its privately-financed, government encouraged infrastructure and stimulus plan.
    Rural folks objecting to roads and stuff going across their lands is not that new. They all wanted the railroad and roads, but many objected to where they were routed….sort of a old time “Not in my backyard” or NIMBY thing. You can see the result when you travel some older county roads which run straight until suddenly they take a sharp turn to the right (or left), run along a little way and then take another sharp turn to get back on their original course. The turns show where some landowner refused to allow the road to cross his land and forced it to divert around it. Of course, you cannot build a high-speed rail line like that.
    The question here is whether the wishes of a few landowners should be allowed to stand in the way of a possibly highly desirable project. Resolving that problem is why we have eminent domain in the first place.

    • donuthin2

      I am a rural land owner and kinda understand why many are opposed to their land being split by a rail without relatively easy access to both sides with large farm equipment. Most understand the need for eminent domain, but at the same time believe that they should be compensated not only for the land that is taken but for the long term effects and inconvenience. Most, while they may not like it, understand the necessity for roads, utilities, water supplies, some pipelines but they absolutely hate a city taking their land for a shopping mall, casinos, parks, industrial park, etc. Trump will be all about the latter.

      • donuthin2

        Also, Gov Perry’s arrogance absolutely screwed up any chance for the Trans Texas Corridor. Also, the fact that it was to be built and operated, maybe owned by a group that would have financed it but with the state guaranteeing the loan. That just made no sense at all.

        • SpiritofPearl

          How do you think landowners will respond when eminent domain takes their land for The Wall?

          • WUSRPH

            They already have had some land taken for the current fencing…..they did not like it….In some places it has separated their ranches, etc. into two parts. Because of flooding potential, etc. in some places the fence had to be some distance inland from the Rio Grande in the Valley. The result is a golf course outside the fence in one location, plus a threat to split a wildlife preserve…..Stupid but that is what happens when you artificially attempt to divide a naturally connected area with a wall.

          • SpiritofPearl

            “The land of the free and home of the brave” is no more.

          • José

            It’s a lot of land and people don’t appreciate just how much. The existing fence, where it exists, in some places is set back a pretty fair distance, up to the better part of a mile. There are fields between the river and the fence so there must be a procedure for access but that’s a hassle for the farmers and an extra expense for us, the taxpayers. It would be much, much worse with a wall. I can think of four ways. The bigger construction would have a larger footprint and thereby use up more land permanently. It would be set back further from the river, isolating more usable land. The current fence doesn’t stretch the entire border so a complete wall would again take up more land. And if it’s going to be more secure than the fence then the property on the outside of the wall would be even more difficult to use, both for humans and natural wildlife. Lose, lose, lose, lose. And that’s not taking into account the innate ugliness of this monstrosity.

          • SpiritofPearl

            I have hiked around Big Bend a couple of times and have seen what rough country it is. Putting a wall at Santa Elena Canyon would be a sin and serve no purpose other than as performance art for the bubbas.

            Would Texans be willing to accept reduced payment from the administration in exchange for so-called security? They haven’t shown willingness to do that in the past.

          • WUSRPH

            But think of how pretty it would look from space.

          • José

            While composing my comments this morning I was looking at the fence line on the online map to check my recollection on how it deviates from the river shore. The thing just turns my stomach. Like a scar. And it’s even worse from the ground. You could literally see it from my parents’ yard, a constant reminder of the foolish arrogance of people who don’t live there.

  • John Bernard Books

    If all you’ve got is calling someone a racist….
    “But the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who is vying for the chairmanship of the Democratic National Committee, says one lesson of 2016 is that identity politics can take the party only so far and that Democrats would be better off finding a values-based and economic message that cuts across demographics.”
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/feb/22/pete-buttigieg-dnc-chairman-candidate-says-party-n/

    Dems have no values and only know taxNspend.

  • WUSRPH

    You may have seeen

  • John Bernard Books

    Draining the swamp….
    “In addition to Scialabba, DHS sources cited seven additional career bureaucrats at the Department of Homeland Security whom President Trump can fire or remove now in order to remove potential obstacles to his agenda:
    2. David Grannis, Principal Deputy Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis in the Office of Intelligence and Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security.
    3. Tracy Renaud, Acting Deputy Director, Management Directorate, USCIS, DHS
    4. Daniel Renaud, Associate Director, Field Operations Directorate, USCIS, DHS
    5. Joanna Ruppel, Acting Associate Director, Refugee, Asylum and International Operations, USCIS, DHS
    6. Mark Borkowski, Assistant Commissioner for Technology Innovation and Acquisition, Customs and Border Patrol, DHS
    7. Seth M. Stodder, Assistant Secretary for Border, Immigration and Trade Policy, Office of Policy, Department of Homeland Security
    8. Mary E. Giovagnoli, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Border, Immigration and Trade Policy, Department of Homeland Security
    Here is the case for firing or removing the seven other Obama loyalist holdovers on the top eight list of bureaucrats President Trump can fire or remove at the Department of Homeland Security:
    2. David Grannis, Principal Deputy Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis in the Office of Intelligence and Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security.
    As a civil servant, Grannis cannot be fired from his job.
    A lifelong Democrat, “[p]rior to joining DHS, Mr. Grannis served as the Staff Director of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) from 2009 through 2014 and as the Minority Staff Director for 2015. During this time, he served as the principal intelligence advisor to SSCI Chairman Dianne Feinstein and SSCI Members and led the Committee’s efforts to produce and enact annual Intelligence Authorization Act from 2010 through 2016 and the Cybersecurity Act of 2015, according to the DHS website.

    He has spent his career working for partisan Democratic members of Congress:
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/02/22/eight-more-obama-bureaucrats-donald-trump-can-remove-homeland-security/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social

    Do you know who I am…….

  • John Bernard Books

    Draining the swamp…
    ““The way the progressive left runs is that if they can’t get it passed, they’re just going to put it in some sort of regulation in an agency,” he said. “That’s all going to be deconstructed.””
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/02/23/steve-bannon-details-trump-agenda-deconstruction-administrative-state/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social

    Should low level bureaucrats like WASSUP be allowed to have their own agenda?…..

  • John Bernard Books
  • SpiritofPearl
    • John Johnson

      Another opinion with a solid base, but no compromise solution. With secure borders, we can interview and let in who we want to, and provide proper documentation to those most qualified to enter the country for specific jobs…be they menial or professional.

  • donuthin2

    It looks like the democratic leadership, what is left of it, is going to squander and opportunity by moving further to the left. They will have an opportunity to gain some traction if Trump proves to be as bad as anticipated, but they do no appear to be very pragmatic about choosing a strategy.

    • John Johnson

      Bingo. Their plan is to simply obfuscate, whine and cry.

      • BCinBCS

        Just like the Tea Party did.

  • John Bernard Books

    Adulting schools for dems…
    “In the last several years, there’s been growing alarm over the fact that many democrats can no longer perform basic skills. In fact, one survey goes so far as to say that there are 20 basic skills – ranging from reading a map to baking bread – that are in danger of extinction in some of the developed parts of the world.”
    http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/adulting-school-founded-teach-millennials-how-be-adults

    Life is hard, why make it harder by being a democrat…..

  • John Bernard Books

    No no and no…
    “CNN’s Chris Cuomo thinks that a 12 year old little girl is the problem if she doesn’t want to be in a locker room with a male where he can expose his genitals to her. He also said that if her father had a problem with it, he is either overprotective or intolerant.”
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/02/cnns-chris-cuomo-suggests-12-year-old-girls-problem-dont-want-see-males-genitals-locker-rooms/

    Cumo is the Anthony Weinnie at CNN….

  • SpiritofPearl

    Neither Cornyn or McCaul are supportive of The Wall – reality bites.

  • WUSRPH

    ON THIS DAY

    On Feb. 24, 1868, the United States House of Representatives impeached President Andrew Johnson following his attempted dismissal of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton; Johnson was later acquitted by the Senate.

    • BCinBCS

      I knew that Johnson had been impeached but I didn’t know why. Weren’t cabinet posts appointed by the President in the 1860’s? If so what rational reason was there for impeachment? Didn’t cabinet members serve at the discretion of the President?

      • WUSRPH

        Yes, presidents appointed cabinet members then. But the Johnson situation grew out of the that fact He was engaged in a major battle with the “Radical Republicans” who controlled the Congress over Reconstruction policies. He was taking a much milder approach to the South than the Congress desired. Stanton agreed with the Congress and Johnson wanted to remove him. The Congress tried to block that (and set up grounds to get rid of Johnson) by passing a law saying that no appointee who had been subject to confirmation by the Senate could be removed without the approval of the Senate. I was intended to be a direct challenge to Johnson…He took up the challenge and fired Stanton (replacing him with Gen. Grant)…..The radicals used this as the grounds for impeachment.

  • WUSRPH

    Texas Democrats now have their targets for State House and Senate seats:

    “Newly released data from the Texas Legislative Council shows 10 state House districts and one Senate district where Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton received more votes, despite those districts being represented by Republicans.” (Texas Tribune)

    Trump DID NOT carry a single Democratic district.

  • WUSRPH

    One of the reasons why repealing the ACA is not so easy:

    ” Wisconsin governor Scott Walker yesterday, …. leading a small working group of governors trying to help Congressional Republicans figure out how to handle the Medicaid expansion aspect of Obamacare. In the 31 states that chose to expand the eligibility for the health program that is jointly run by the federal and state governments, about 10.7 million people are now covered by Medicaid that otherwise wouldn’t be covered. If you just repeal that, then those 10 million need something new.” (The National Review)

    • José

      Let’s be sure not to let GOPers wriggle out of this. They repeatedly said “repeal”, knowing that they were flat out lying to their base. The 2016 Presidential election has really put Congressional Republicans in an awkward bind.

      • SpiritofPearl

        The ACA was designed with that in mind.

  • John Bernard Books

    Dems are sad…
    “Consecutive gains in the Dow Jones Industrial Average have left it at the doorstep of history, including a 20 percent surge in futures from the early hours of Nov. 9 that could be loosely framed as the president’s own bull market. The 120-year-old measure has set a record on 10 straight days — the longest streak since the Ronald Reagan administration. Two more would tie it for the longest ever.”
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-02-24/trump-at-brink-of-his-own-bull-market-as-dow-flirts-with-history

    I’m not my portfolio is growing….

  • WUSRPH

    You see that the WH is denying–but not very well—reports that it leaned on the FBI to try to get it not to deny talk about Trump contacts with the Russians. The FBI is said to have refused. I guess Comey remembered what happened to L. Patrick Gray who cooperated with the Nixon WH only to be left hanging in the wind.

    • WUSRPH

      The Washington Post has updated its tracking of the 60 things Trump said he would do in the first 100 days. He’s running behind, but he has time to catch up.

      http://tinyurl.com/z94cuxe

      • WUSRPH

        You see where Trump has asked a group of business leaders to draft an economic plan for him. He is, in effect, telling us that he doesn’t have one, despite all his big talk during the campaign. But the fact that he’s looking for help from people who just might know something about the subject is at least partially good news.

        • John Johnson

          That is what a good executive does…he delegates to those with the largest storehouse of knowledge.

          • WUSRPH

            Censor is holding up my reply…..which was basically that if Trump had known what he was talking about he would not have to call on others to build him a program. I noted that a good corporate executive could not have made the kinds of promises and claims did because the SEC, FTC and other regulatory agencies make that kind of spreading falsehoods a crime for businessmen. Politicians, however, are exempt from those controls.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Just like “repeal and replace.”

    • John Johnson

      You must have missed the part about Comey OK’ing the release of the info as confirmed by the FBI.

      • WUSRPH

        Nope….I specifically said that the FBI refused the request to lie. My comment about the difference between Comey and L. Patrick Gray also made it clear that this WH failed in its attempt to get the FBI to deny what it knew.

        • SpiritofPearl

          The “dossier” is looking more likely to be true with each passing day.

          Can’t figure out why Priebus does these things. He should know better.

          • WUSRPH

            When you live in a world like he did for so long where Perception is More Important than Reality you can lose your sense of where the line should be drawn. It must be particularly hard when you are in a situation where lying is not just approved of but is made an art form.

          • SpiritofPearl

            He never had the kind of close scrutiny ne’s receiving now and he doesn’t like it, but the press is not going away.

  • WUSRPH

    Well, that’s my attempts to stir things up today…I guess folks are waiting for RG’s weekly wrap up of stories.

  • WUSRPH

    Well, we can start with Medicare and Medicaid that are run for an average cost of 11 cents per dollar while private health insurance costs an average of at least 22 cents per $100. Something about not paying such high salaries and not having to make a profit makes the difference.

  • BCinBCS

    Medicare.

  • WUSRPH

    Well, it has started: Today the WH banned a number of major news organizations AND cameras from the daily briefing……They can’t take the heat so they try to make it harder for the reporters to do their jobs…..I wonder when the Red Hats will start attacking cameramen, reporters and maybe even the stations and printing plants? They have certainly been told who to go after. More and more this Administration (sic) looks like post 1932 Germany.

  • WUSRPH

    We already have a number of victims of the hate stirred up by Trumptarianism—-two Indian-born engineers being the latest—-but my question is when do we get a Horst Wessel Red Hat?

  • Jack R.

    I love how Democrats constantly re-write history. Once such instance is that “all Hispanics are automatically Democrats…”. Nothing could be further from the truth.

    Dems like to pander to EVERYONE to get on welfare and get back on the plantation, regardless of your skin color. White, black, brown……if you’re lazy and want a free ride, Liberals will pander to you.