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The Republican Tax Bill Likely Will Add to the Coming Explosion in the National Debt

Guest column: Dissembling political parties are guilty of adding to the eventual debt crisis.

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United States President Donald J. Trump displays his signature after signing the $1.5 trillion tax cut bill, stacked on his desk, in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington, DC, prior to his departure to Mar-a-Lago, Florida for the holidays.
Rex Features via AP Images

Contrary to the partisan narratives of our two dissembling political parties, federal deficits and the national debt have been growing steadily since WWII through every administration, with the sole exception of the Clinton administration.  The growing deficits have been the result of the federal government spending more and collecting less of our gross national output.

Democrats and Republicans like to do a lot of finger pointing about tax cuts and spending increases, but the historical record shows that since 1960 both parties have been gradually increasing spending and decreasing taxes thereby fueling our ever-growing national debt.

But what is even more troubling is that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) says things are going to get much worse.  According its estimates, federal deficits will steadily accelerate over the next decade, reaching nearly $1.5 trillion annually by 2027.  The increases will be primarily driven by an explosion in the costs of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and interest on the national debt.

The cost of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid has already risen from about $1 trillion in 2007 to $2 trillion today and now account for nearly half of all federal spending.  The CBO expects their cost will rise to $3.6 trillion over the next ten years.  Of the three, Medicare rises most, more than doubling.  These increases are driven primarily by the fact that our population will grow significantly older in the next decade.

As much as conservatives like to rail about the cost of welfare programs, they only account for about seven percent of all federal government spending.  And the CBO projects that welfare spending will be relatively flat over the next decade, rising only about fifteen percent.  If we ended all welfare programs, it would barely dent the deficits the CBO foresees.  And since about a third of welfare spending is on food stamps and school lunch programs, which are strongly supported by Republicans in agricultural states, large cuts are unlikely.

One of the CBO’s most chilling projections is the federal government’s future interest cost.  Because of falling interest rates, there has been almost no increase in the government’s interest cost in the last ten years.  But the CBO projects that the interest expense will more than triple by 2027 to over $800 billion because of the exploding deficits they expect in the next decade.

So, against this alarming forecast, what do the Republicans do?  Well, cut taxes, of course. President Trump signed the latest tax reduction bill into law just before Christmas.

The Republican theory is that the cuts will spur economic growth thus increasing federal tax receipts.  This so-called supply side theory was popularized by economist Arthur Laffer during the Reagan administration.  The theory holds that there is a level of taxation that becomes so oppressive it begins to discourage the incentive to produce and thus retards economic growth.

The argument has a certain intuitive appeal, but exactly where the tipping point is and how other economic factors may affect its operation cannot be objectively proved.  There is scant evidence in the historical record that the theory actually works.  Republican mythology is that the Reagan tax cuts set off a halcyon economic revival. Those tax cuts actually resulted to the largest percentage increase in the national debt in our history (that’s right, Reagan increased the debt by a larger percentage than President Obama). The theory is also belied by the Clinton administration during which the deficits dramatically fell even though tax rates increased. Amid the George W. Bush administration, the country fell into a deep recession despite his tax cuts.

More globally, both as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product and in marginal rates, taxes have steadily declined since WWII.  But, so has GDP.  So, clearly, lowering taxes does not guarantee growth. (The GDP is the value of everything produced by the people and companies in a country, and is a standard measure of growth.)

Federal receipts and expenditures as a percentage of the Gross Domestic Product.

Everyone agrees that if the recently passed Republican tax bill does not increase growth, it will add $1.5 trillion to $2 trillion to the national debt over the next ten years on top of the $10 trillion that CBO is already projecting.  So, the Republican Party, like a desperate spendthrift in a casino, is making one last bet that supply-side economics will save the day.  If the dice come up craps, they and the country are screwed.

They are making their bet against the consensus of independent economists who believe new tax provisions will come nowhere near paying for themselves.  Economists polled by Bloomberg and the Chicago School of Economics overwhelming panned the bill.  The Wharton School of Business, the president’s alma mater, has issued a study predicting it will add to the deficit as have the CBO, the Joint Committee on Taxation, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, the Tax Policy Center and a host of other policy and watchdog groups.  Some of these analyses foresee a short-term sugar high from the tax cuts, but none believe they will have a lasting effect on GDP growth in the long term.

We may get better economic growth whether the tax bill has any affect or not.  The world economy is doing to better than many expected.  Personally, I suspect that Trump’s campaign to roll back some of the regulatory burden may have more of an impact than cutting taxes.

But the long-term problem will persist regardless.  Both political parties promote narratives to explain the structural deficit that resonate with their respective bases and each narrative contains a grain of truth.  But while welfare queens and greedy corporations may contribute nominally to our federal deficits, they are principally driven by an aging population and the enormous medical expenses that demographic change will drive (think about the cost of Alzheimer’s care a decade from now).  That is the real inconvenient truth that neither party wants to address because the solutions are hard, complicated and fraught with political peril.  Much easier to just cut taxes for the donor class and promise voters ever increasing benefits. That may be expedient politics, but it will eventually bankrupt the country.

Bill King is a Houston businessman, attorney and former mayoral candidate. Opinions expressed by Texas Monthly guest columnists are their own.

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  • WUSRPH

    When the Laffer Curve AGAIN proves not to work the GOP will pick up their old mantra of: “Cut the waste, fraud, corruption and unnecessary spending” as the miracle solution to all our problems…..Of course, their definition of waste, fraud, corruption and unnecessary spending tends to mean anything that benefits people below the top five percent of the wealth level.

  • St. Anger

    That is one really long false equivalency. Leave it to a “moderate” to be so “thoughtful” as to miss the truth.

    • anonyfool

      That first sentence of whataboutism in the article sets the tone for me not to buy anything.

    • SpiritofPearl

      Whose truth?

  • SpiritofPearl

    Choosing to add $1.7 trillion to the debt when the Boomers are retiring was the height of stupidity.

    • April

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      • SpiritofPearl

        Margaret got a brand new Range Rover. Karl Rove had one of those, too.

  • John Bernard Books

    I’ve never met a dem who didn’t believe, “if we could just spend a little more we could solve the world’s problems.” That is why they are known as TaxNspend dems….

    • Mike G.

      As the article points out, the “TaxNspend dems” are the other side of the coin where the TaxCutNspend Republicans reside.

      • John Bernard Books

        so you’re enjoying your tax cut?

  • Kozmo

    No one will talk seriously about cutting military spending, of course. The bottomless pit of pits when it comes to federal waste.

    • SpiritofPearl

      “Beware the military/industrial complex.”

    • BCinBCS

      When I was in school, I marveled at the craziness of the 30-year war. I thought, “How can a war continue without a winner for thirty years?” After sixteen years, the Afghanistan war, now America’s longest war, is more than half way there.

  • SeeItMyWay

    I have grown weary of all the economists’ wacko plans for decreasing national debt. What were you taught as a kid with regards to managing money? If you spend more than you make, eventually you will be upside down and bankrupt.

    When Americans were saving big money on fuel costs, markets were dropping, and the oil companies were once again going through an “only the strong survive” period, many “gurus” were bemoaning the fact that people were using the savings to service debt instead of going out and spending it on a new car, or whatever. They broadcast that only through spending like a drunk sailor could we right the economic ship.

    How much longer can we allow this type of crazy economic thinking to guide us?

    It’s synonymous with can kicking; there is a day of reckoning coming; the dog is running full speed to the end of its chain. It is going to hurt. There is no way around it. This is the bottomline.

    No politician is going to say, “We are going to have to drastically shave benefits” and survive, so no one has the balls to say it. We would rather push the results of our mistakes and selfishness onto future generations, and they are going to hate us.

    We are an immoral lot and I am ashamed to be part of it.

    • BCinBCS

      Yea, JJ, you are absolutely right. There is absolutely no way to solve our deficit problem other than to starve granny.

      Too bad there are no examples of other countries who have robust social welfare programs that benefit all yet don’t bankrupt the country that we could use as examples for how to solve our deficit problem. And, it’s also too bad that those countries, like the nonexistent Scandinavian nations, also don’t have the happiest, most content people in the world.

      • SpiritofPearl

        JJ is happy to starve grannies, just not HIS granny . . .

  • BCinBCS

    Who put you in charge of comments? Just because you did not specifically mention starving granny does not mean that your solution will not do that. It’s the height of hubris to state that I shouldn’t mention it.

    You are the quintessential conservative, you have a melt-down when things do not go exactly as you want them. You cannot adapt. Your kind will be the loser in the evolutionary battle.

    Obtuse? Perhaps you should increase your reading comprehension or broaden your reading list since you apparently have failed to understand what your political heroes have in store for granny (e.g. Paul Ryan). They are specifically targeting her and they certainly are not including themselves (cf. the recently passed tax redistribution bill).

    • SeeItMyWay

      I am in the Granny and Grandpa category, Bozo. The Boomers who caused the problems should pay for them. Do I need to explain this statement to you, too. Obtuse. It fits.

    • SpiritofPearl

      Whose family member will quit her job (and it’s always a female) to stay home to take care of Granny? Whose education will be aborted to stay home to take of Granny? How will the long term financial goals of a family be aborted so that someone takes care of Granny?

      • SeeItMyWay

        Someone is going to have to pay for our fiscal mistakes. Either we do it or the wheels totally fall off after we are gone and the generations that follow pay. I wonder if anyone is teaching this in college macroeconomics courses. What a stupid question.

  • John Bernard Books
  • WUSRPH

    I saw the new movie about Winston Churchill, The Greatest Challenge, tonight and can recommend it to all if only because it once more reminds us of how one individual can shape history…..Of course, that can be good—as it was in Churchill’s case in 1940—or bad—as it was in the case of Hitler……or perhaps a Trump..

    Based on my readings and study of the period the movie is fairly accurate EXCEPT for one hookie scene in which they have him descending into the London Underground (subway) to ask common folks what they thought he should do, That, of course, never happened nor would a man like Churchill even consider such a thing…(As he notes earlier in the movie he had never ridden a bus in his life and had been in a Underground Station only once, during the Great Strike of 1926, And, you can be certain that he stayed that way.)

    • John Bernard Books

      Actually it is true, my sources verify it….

    • SpiritofPearl

      Have you seen Churchill’s war rooms?

      http://www.iwm.org.uk/exhibitions/churchill-war-rooms/cabinet-war-rooms

      There were sleeping accommodations for Winston and Clemmie, but they slept there only a few times, preferring the comforts of 10 Downing St. to the Spartan quarters under Whitehall.

      • WUSRPH

        Yes, we visited them when we were in England in September of 2016. We also went to Dover and saw Adm. Ramsey’s HQ dug into the hill from which the Dunkirk operation was run.

        • SpiritofPearl

          It supports your comment about Churchill and subways. He was a thorough Torey.

          • WUSRPH

            While it is true that in many ways Churchill was a man of the 19th (or even the 18th Century) he was not totally opposed to improving the life of the “lower classes” as he supported improvements both during his sojourn to the Liberal Party and after his return to the Tories. But, dispute what we today view as faults in his beliefs and policies, the world owes him a great and unpayable debt for the stand he took against Hitler and tyranny. I shudder to think about what the world would be like today had he had been there when his time in history arrived.

          • SpiritofPearl

            He did his duty to England and the west. Not such a good friend to India . . .

  • BCinBCS

    Comrade Trump gave an exclusive interview to the New York Times. I’m sure that you are as weary as am I about the sheer incompetence of the man nonetheless here is a short quote from that interview:

    I know more about the big bills. … Than any president that’s ever been in office. Whether it’s health care and taxes. Especially taxes. And if I didn’t, I couldn’t have persuaded a hundred. … You ask Mark Meadows [inaudible]. … I couldn’t have persuaded a hundred congressmen to go along with the bill. The first bill, you know, that was ultimately, shockingly rejected … I know the details of taxes better than anybody. Better than the greatest C.P.A. I know the details of health care better than most, better than most. And if I didn’t, I couldn’t have talked all these people into doing ultimately only to be rejected…
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/28/us/politics/trump-interview-excerpts.html?_r=0

    This is the leader of the free world. The person with his finger on the nuclear button. Despite this craziness, there are those who blindly follow him.

    Here is what Ezra Klein thinks:

    This is the president of the United States speaking to the New York Times. His comments are, by turns, incoherent, incorrect, conspiratorial, delusional, self-aggrandizing, and underinformed. This is not a partisan judgment — indeed, the interview is rarely coherent or specific enough to classify the points Trump makes on a recognizable left-right spectrum. As has been true since he entered American politics, Trump is interested in Trump — over the course of the interview, he mentions his Electoral College strategy seven times, in each case using it to underscore his political savvy and to suggest that he could easily have won the popular vote if he had tried.

    I am not a medical professional, and I will not pretend to know what is truly happening here. It’s become a common conversation topic in Washington to muse on whether the president is suffering from some form of cognitive decline or psychological malady. I don’t think those hypotheses are necessary or meaningful. Whatever the cause, it is plainly obvious from Trump’s words that this is not a man fit to be president, that he is not well or capable in some fundamental way. That is an uncomfortable thing to say, and so many prefer not to say it, but Trump does not occupy a job where such deficiencies can be safely ignored.
    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/12/29/16829806/trump-interview-new-york-times

    2020 cannot get here quickly enough.

    • SpiritofPearl
      • SeeItMyWay

        What should we take away from this piece? That Trump is a delusional narcissist who has Alzheimer’s? Should we view it in the same light as the reports on Hillary’s mental and physical decline after her fall and concussion? Trump is a boring chest beater who talks in chopped sentences. This is nothing new.

        Only you Dem’s are locking onto stuff like this. The rest are taking notice of the fact we are now off high center and making positive moves, even with all the distractions.

        • Too Sweet

          I have hesitated to write this response, JJ, because you have become so shrill lately that I am not certain you are worth engaging, but I will give it one shot.

          I am not sure what you think Trump has accomplished that serves the people who voted for him. He was supposed to be a populist, but is proving to be the antithesis. The working people in this country have been getting the short end of the stick for 40 years and I have not seen anything he has done that will change that. Quite the opposite.

          About 30 years ago, when I was a young newspaperman, I was set up by a contact with an interview with Bunker Hunt. You might remember him. He used to be, like his brother Lamar (owner of the Kansas City Chiefs), one of the richest men in the world. He and his third brother (not Lamar) decided in the late 1970s they were going to corner the world silver market. It did not work and he lost almost everything. He was still rich, but not Hunt-rich. I asked him why he did it. Why he would gamble pretty much everything when he already had more money than most small towns would spend in a century. He told me that at a certain point it stops being about the money. It’s all about keeping score.

          That’s what’s been happening for 40 years. Local industry gutted and shipped overseas, destroying the economy of small cities and towns across the country, all for the sake of a financial shark’s quick buck and bragging rights at cocktail parties.

          I used to work blue collar, about forty years ago. I had two plants I worked at in the industrial northern city of my youth closed and the operations shipped away to undercut union labor. Those places moved first to Oklahoma and Texas, but now both those U.S. shops have closed and the manufacturing is done in China. So I lived through what they are living. There were lots of other plants then, though, so I didn’t think anything of it. Instead I got a college degree and a professional job. That option would not be available to me today.

          The tax bill the man you voted for brags about will make this even worse. It issues a $1.5 trillion credit card that only corporations and extremely rich people can use, but leaves us all with the bill. It makes it easier to offshore profits and move even more jobs away.

          If all you wanted was a half-wit cowboy on the Supreme Court and nonstop racism, you got your guy. If you were looking for a populist who would address the financial needs of the rest of us, you got conned.

          But I expect you know that. I think that is why you have gotten so shrill.

          • BCinBCS

            Great response.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Now the comment is shown as “awaiting moderation.” Why?

          • BCinBCS

            I don’t know. Maybe someone flagged it as inappropriate.

          • WUSRPH

            Why don’t you repeat it for those of us who missed it.

          • BCinBCS

            Here is what Too Sweet wrote (for those who cannot access it):

            I have hesitated to write this response, JJ, because you have become so shrill
            lately that I am not certain you are worth engaging, but I will give it one shot.

            I am not sure what you think Trump has accomplished that serves the people who voted for him. He was supposed to be a populist, but is proving to be the antithesis. The working people in this country have been getting the short end of the stick for 40 years and I have not seen anything he has done that will change that. Quite the opposite.

            About 30 years ago, when I was a young newspaperman, I was set up by a contact with an interview with Bunker Hunt. You might remember him. He used to be, like his brother Lamar (owner of the Kansas City Chiefs), one of the richest men in the world. He and his
            third brother (not Lamar) decided in the late 1970s they were going to corner the world silver market. It did not work and he lost almost everything. He was still rich, but not Hunt-rich. I asked him why he did it. Why he would gamble pretty much everything when he already had more money than most small towns would spend in a century. He told me that at a certain point it stops being about the money. It’s all about keeping score.

            That’s what’s been happening for 40 years. Local industry gutted and shipped overseas, destroying the economy of small cities and towns across the country, all for the sake of a financial shark’s quick buck and bragging rights at cocktail parties.

            I used to work blue collar, about forty years ago. I had two plants I worked at in the industrial northern city of my youth closed and the operations shipped away to undercut union labor. Those places moved first to Oklahoma and Texas, but now both those U.S. shops have closed and the manufacturing is done in China. So I lived through what they are living There were lots of other plants then, though, so I didn’t think anything of it. Instead I got a college degree and a professional job. That option would not be available to me today.

            The tax bill the man you voted for brags about will make this even worse. It issues a $1.5 trillion credit card that only corporations and extremely rich people can use, but leaves us all with the bill. It makes it easier to offshore profits and move even more jobs away.

            If all you wanted was a half-wit cowboy on the Supreme Court and nonstop racism, you got your guy. If you were looking for a populist who would address the financial needs of the rest of us, you got conned.

            But I expect you know that. I think that is why you have gotten so shrill.

          • St. Anger

            JJ deserves credit for noticing that corporations and the wealthy have coopted our political system, even if it did take him 70-odd years to piece it together.

            But unlike the other 60 million who have noticed this, JJ concluded that the best solution to disproportionate power going to the wealthy and the corporations is to give them the presidency, too.

            From which I conclude that JJ is the classic broken clock.

            At some point i expect he will be right a second time …

          • WUSRPH

            That is like giving someone credit for noticing that the sky appears to be blue when he is totally uwilling to even begin figuring out why that may be.

          • SeeItMyWay

            I went to Disqus and read it. Showing up on my BB page now but w/o ability to reply.

          • WUSRPH

            You can read it by clicking on it….And, as you say, a great comment. I do not know whether JJ has responded….and don’t really care….but I suspect that, if he does, it will be self-defensive and include attacks on the rest of us…..he has to continue to believe…..he has nowhere else to go…and will never admit that his hopes have not been met…..

          • WUSRPH

            Since both Too Sweet and I have said that the Trump Tax Bill further encourages American investments in foreign countries, I thought I should explain how that works. I will keep it as simple and simplistic as possible since I know JJ thinks in those terms.

            Under the taw law prior to the new TRUMP TAX American corporations with plants and operations and sales abroad had to pay US taxes on ALL their operations, whether based in the US or say Ireland. They also had to pay the appropriate taxes in the foreign country, again say Ireland. We were one of the few major nations with this kind of a dual tax system.

            The TRUMP TAX BILL changes this to make ONLY the income from their US operations and sales subject to US taxes…..ALL income from their foreign operations will now be exempted from US taxes although they will still have to pay the tax due to say Ireland. This is called a “territorial tax system”.

            The result will be to encourage further investment, etc. in foreign countries since whatever is earned from that operation will be TAX FREE as far as the US is concerned. Why invest in a plant in Texas when you will have to pay taxes on any income it produces when you can get tax free profits by investing abroad?

            This is something that the globalists have been seeking for years. It is also directly opposite to what Trump proposed during his campaign in order to force those companies to “bring our jobs back”…..Another Trump Promise that was conveniently forgotten after the election.

          • SeeItMyWay

            What are the odds of my asking a specific question in response to a Too Sweet post and WUSRPH’s answering that specific question without continuing to read every word I post here? He has not blocked me; he can’t help himself.

            How can anyone say foreign investment income is “tax free” if that income is taxed in the country where garnered?

            In the past, we have taxed money transferred back into the U.S. by U.S. corporations. This is why they chose not to move any of it back here for reinvestment. There was talk of giving them a pass on paying taxes on this foreign held money if they declared it and put it to use here in the U.S. I believe this is what the new tax code does.

            This link should explain it better:
            https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-03-04/u-s-companies-are-stashing-2-1-trillion-overseas-to-avoid-taxes

          • WUSRPH

            One has to wonder if there is any real rational purpose behind the Trump Tax Bill other than rewarding the wealthy……and at least one conservative economist, George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen, who co-hosts the blog Marginal Revolution, think he has found it.

            According to The National Review, “Cowen, in fact, sees a pattern where others see only mayhem. “The real significance of the Trump economic revolution,” he wrote in a Bloomberg column earlier this month, “is a focus on investment.” The goal of Trump and the Republicans who fashioned the tax cut package, he argues, is to “make the U.S.
            a new and dominant center for investment, including at the expense of other nations.”

            Read more at:
            http://www.nationalreview.com/article/454985/taking-trump-seriously-foreign-policy-economy&hl=en&geo=US?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=NR%20Daily%20Saturday%202017-12-30&utm_term=NR5PM%20Actives

            The theory apparently is that, if you give business a large enough pot of cash by cutting taxes and lowering such things as regulatory costs, it will freely do such things as increase its worker’s wages, hire new ones, and invest in new plants and products producing growth in the economy (and in Laffer’s theory, enough new revenues to offset
            the tax cuts )

            A nice thought, but based on prior experience—including with both the Reagan and George W., tax cuts—one has to have some doubts……

            Increasing wages is probably the least likely as absent a severe shortage of qualified workers business is not known for its largesse toward its employees other than its top executives. Similarly, in recent years much of business appears to be less interested in expanding into new plants and products than it has been with suffocating potential competition thru mergers. This has been particularly true in the high-tech sector where larger firms have been gobbling up new start-ups to stifle competition and, in some cases perhaps even innovation, being more inclined to gradually “improve” existing products such as the various versions of the I-phone rather than invest in new breakthroughs. Instead, it has been increasing executive salaries and stockholder dividends or engaging in stock buybacks.

            Changing these trends will probably require more than just loading business down with tons of new cash…..It might, for example, require a beefed up approach to anti-trust actions which, despite the Trump Administration’s apparent retaliatory attack on a major media merger , is highly unlikely to be favored by the GOP.

            In more directed economies the kind of investment that is required has often been “encouraged” by incentives both “positive” such as additional tax cuts for investment in research and development and for hiring and training workers or government support for new plants and subsidizes for new industries and innovations (such as our existing incentives for alternative energy developments which many in the GOP want to kill)…. or “negative” such as higher taxes on profits that are not reinvested into what the government feels are useful purposes. But, to date, neither the Trump Administration or the GOP in Congress, which has really being making the policy, has shown any indication to enact anything more than tax cuts.

            Whether they might consider such things should the tax cuts and other actions not produce the outcomes which they dream of–as was the case with both the Reagan and Bush cuts– is unknown. In such as case, the GOP might consider adopting some “positive” incentives but anything “negative” might require a change in Administrations and the control of Congress.

            In the meantime, we will all have to sit and watch to see whether this grand experiment by the GOP works this time despite the fact that it failed every other time they tried it.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Read an article which, unfortunately, I neglected to bookmark. The basic thesis is that the GOP is incapable of governing. Moreover, that would have been realized during the first term of GWB. His second term was beset by failures, but his first term was saved by the 9/11 attack when we all rallied around him.

      • BCinBCS

        Having a president* who may not be all there and, as such, is susceptible to flattery because it reassures him that he actually is makes the heist that much easier.

        If what Charles P. Pierce wrote is true, then his statement explains a lot.

        It would be interesting to get a (many) psychiatrist’s opinions. If they concur then, indeed, we are in grave danger.

        (For those who have not read the Esquire article, it is interesting, raises some serious questions and is short. Give it a read and give your opinion.)
        http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/politics/a14516912/donald-trump-new-york-times-michael-schmidt/

        • BCinBCS

          I worry that those in the mainstream may be misinterpreting facts much as people routinely do on the alt- and conservative right. Is extreme narcissism, lack of education and unwillingness to learn being misconstrued as dementia?

          In the previous posts by Pearl and me, two respected journalists raise fears that the president of the United States may have a debilitating disease. Is this a legitimate concern or an overreaction? Was Ronald Reagan a one-off or are we going through another incapacitation? Should the 25th Amendment be invoked? Would Republicans allow it?

          • SpiritofPearl

            See above.

            Reagan, Nixon, Kennedy, FDR were all incapacitated at various times during their presidencies with various outcomes.

          • WUSRPH

            Even if Trump is deranged, unless he starts talking about bombing anyone who crosses us (adopting JJ’s foreign policy) there is little chance that anyone will try to use the 25th Amendment. The best we could hope from the group of sycophants who surround him is that they would lock him in his tv lounge and let him watch cable news all day long and make his tweeter a dummy that does not reach anyone else…..The country functioned for more than a year with Woodrow Wilson secluded in his bedroom seeing only his wife and doctor and it could do the same with Trump if necessary…..

          • SpiritofPearl

            And underlings managed Reagan for years.

          • WUSRPH

            Extreme narcissism is probably a psychotic disorder of some sort but lack of education and unwillingness to learn are not….They are however epidemic among those groups……In fact, some are proud of those failings……they think it makes them more authentic humans…

          • SpiritofPearl

            Observers have commented about his inability to articulate thoughts/ideas coherently, repeating phrases multiple times.

          • BCinBCS

            Is that a sign of mental impairment or simply him having a “senior moment”?

          • SpiritofPearl

            What’s the difference?

          • BCinBCS

            One is temporary while the other is semi-permanent.

          • SpiritofPearl

            I have senior moments wrt remembering names. I am perfectly capable of articulating a thought or concept coherently. Trump seems to have “sundowner’s,” a syndrome observed as Alzheimer’s worsens. The patient becomes more incoherent at the end of the day.

          • SpiritofPearl

            I Googled “Trump’s mental health” and got numerous hits. This one is representative:

            https://www.cnbc.com/2017/12/01/psychiatrists-warn-trump-becoming-more-mentally-unstable.html

        • SpiritofPearl

          Several articles have appeared lately from mental health groups questioning Trump’s stability. Nothing will happen with the GOP in power until . . . SOMETHING happens. Then it will be too late.

          Nixon was so drunk during the last few years that Kissinger quietly took responsibility for the nuclear codes.

    • WUSRPH

      Actually, Trump is improving. The Washington Post could only identify 24 clearly false or misleading statements by Trump in that 30 minute interview……

      • SpiritofPearl

        So that’s about 96/hour. Maybe we can do a time and motion study.

        • BCinBCS

          🙂

          • SpiritofPearl

            We could create a Truth-O-Meter . . .

        • BCinBCS

          Check your math, Pearl.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Oops!

  • John Bernard Books

    Did LBJ lie….
    “Lyndon Johnson & Medicare cost estimates

    There is an interesting interview on National Public Radio [emphasis added] which presents evidence that President Johnson deliberately underestimated the cost of Medicare to get it passed.
    [James Morone, co-author of The Heart of Power: Health and Politics in the Oval Office]: Johnson maneuvered every step of the way getting this bill through Congress, and one of the things he did “” and this is a little dicey in today’s climate “” was suppress the costs. So this young kid gets elected from Massachusetts, Ted Kennedy, in 1962, and Johnson is explaining to him [over the phone] how you get a health bill through. And what he tells him is don’t let them get the costs projected too far out because it will scare other people:

    “A health program yesterday runs $300 million, but the fools had to go to projecting it down the road five or six years, and when you project it the first year, it runs $900 million. Now I don’t know whether I would approve $900 million second year or not. I might approve 450 or 500. But the first thing Dick Russell comes running in saying, ‘My God, you’ve got a billion-dollar program for next year on health, therefore I’m against any of it now.’ Do you follow me?”

    [JM]: We believe, after looking at the evidence, my co-author [David Blumenthal] and I, that if the true cost of Medicare had been known “” if Johnson hadn’t basically hidden them “” the program would never have passed. America’s second-most beloved program would never have happened, if we had had genuine cost estimates”
    http://www1.realclearmarkets.com/2009/10/13/did_lbj_lie_about_medicare039s_costs_94319.html

    I’ve never met a democrat who didn’t lie……yes he lied.

  • John Bernard Books
  • John Bernard Books

    How gullible are dems…..
    “Patagonian Toothfish, the rejected ugly, oily, bottom dwelling toothy fish was rebranded Chilean Sea Bass and became an expensive delicacy for gullible millennials.
    So it is with Socialism, a rejected, ugly, oily, bottom dwelling ideology that enriched the elite and enslaved the masses was rebranded Social Democracy and became a rallying cry for naive 21st century millennials.
    It is often useful to look backward to move forward so let’s review. Karl Marx, author of The Communist Manifesto, stated unequivocally, “Democracy is the road to socialism.”
    Vladimir Lenin, founder of the Russian Communist Party, affirmed, “The goal of socialism is communism.”:
    http://www.independentsentinel.com/leftist-socialism-the-toothfish-of-modern-politics/

    hows zat Sea Bass tasting dems…..

  • John Bernard Books

    Congressman Zell Miller when he resigned from the democrat party said “you can’t fix stupid.” The dem party is a laughable mess consisting of court jesters and clowns….
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/40e7cd6a52220cc97381543811224e58c406f1e06f00343185603fbd7e9c6334.jpg

  • WUSRPH

    Let me close out 2017 with a wish that all of you have a better year in 2018 than you did in 2017 and that you and your loved ones stay healthy.

    We were lucky this year…..Trump, probably because of his incompetence, was not able to do all the damage to America many feared…And the GOP was unable to use its control of Congress to do more than adopt a bad tax bill….when so much more was feared possible.

    Let us hope the same is true in 2018. But let us all remember, as apparently first expressed in the US in an article in the May 2, 1833 edition of The Virginia Free Press and Farmers’ Repository:

    “Some one has justly remarked, that ‘eternal vigilance is the price of liberty.’ Let the sentinels on the watch-tower sleep not, and slumber not.”

    (The quote is often attributed to Thomas Jefferson, but there is no proof that he ever said it…..however, I am certain he would have agreed with it.)

    • WUSRPH

      If there is one thing the Congress did this year it was to POSTPONE things to another time……Now it faces those same questions of the budget, the deficit, entitlements, immigration, health care and so many others in 2018, With that in mind I have a question for you to consider:

      With the current makeup of Congress and the kinds of Any Rand approaches favored by the likes of Speaker Paul Ryan, is it in the best interests of the United States that in 2018:

      (a) The Congress face up to its responsibilities and at least begin to take steps to resolve these many problems; or
      (b) The Congress should continue to be unable (or unwilling) to act in 2018 and again postpone any real actions until after the 2018 elections when (hopefully) the voters will have changed its makeup?

      I don’t know about you….But I favor (b).

    • John Bernard Books

      And you can’t seem to stop mentioning me….how childish you senile old fart

  • John Bernard Books

    Will democrats double down on stupid in 2018…yes as they continue to fade away…..

  • John Bernard Books

    My work here is done…..I’ve exposed dems for what they are

  • WUSRPH

    Happy New Year to all……..It is COLD….but we survived another year in this grand experiment we call America, as Lincoln described it, testing whether “government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” So far we continue to at least muddle through…..as we have for most of our history.

    • St. Anger

      Show me somewhere in this earth that features government of, by, and for …

      It sure ain’t here. Lincoln lost that bet before he made it.

      • WUSRPH

        We are far from perfect. No one or no nation is…..but we have come closer to Lincoln’s description than any other mass democracy.

        • Jed

          i know it is important for you to hold on to that shibboleth.

          but really, think about it. pick any characterization of our system that you prefer: democracy, republic, democratic republic, representative democracy, etc.

          then tell me how we meet the criteria for such a system better than, say, any northern or western european nation today, or an ancient greek city-state, or an italian republic, or any other of the former british colonies, or etc.

          you can’t. the only thing we do better than the others is brag unselfconsciously. new zealand is more democratic than us. any scandinavian country is better governed in the interest of the people. and so on.

          • SpiritofPearl

            NZ has some undemocratic financial policies and females were chattel in the Greek city states. And even now after independence, India’s morass of castes and religions govern life on the local level more so than the “state.”

            Scandanavian countries have much more of a basic compact with their people. They believe they’re all in it together. The Vikings believed that the strongest man should rule, not some insipid herditary monarch.

          • Jed

            “NZ has some undemocratic financial policies”

            and that is worse than us how?

            “and females were chattel in the Greek city states.”

            cf. american founding, american civil war, jim crow, today’s prison-industrial complex, human trafficking (sex and labor).

            “And even now after independence, India’s morass of castes and religions govern life on the local level more so than the “state.””

            huh. that sounds familiar, too, don’t it?

            i think you’ve made my point for me.

          • SpiritofPearl

            You mentioned these countries as more democratic than the U.S. They seem quite undemocratic to my definition of “democracy.”

          • Jed

            my point is that you are calling them undemocratic for featuring characteristics that we share (to put it mildly).

            which makes us what? hardly a beacon of freedom unlike any other.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Look. You and I are both similar in what we hope for in outcomes. My point is that other developed countries (as well as India) are not Paradise. Is that what you believe? Each has shortcomings.

  • WUSRPH

    RG: What about beginning the New Year with an analysis of the Republican primary races for the Texas House outlining the candidates being backed by Empower Texas/Freedom Caucus and those supported by Joe Straus and our the business lobby. It would give us the basis for a scorecard of the outcome and a picture or how well the mythical “moderate Republicans” and “November Republicans” and the radical right do in the election.

  • WUSRPH

    Did you see the interesting story in the Austin A-S on Sunday on how several states have mandated the teaching of what is called “media literacy” in the public schools in an effort to teach children how to distinguish between REAL and FAKE News? Of course, such a bill probably wouldn’t even be referred to a committee in the Texas Senate as Lt. Gov. Patrick could not survive in an environment where the public knew how to distinguish truth from pure political fiction.

    • SeeItMyWay

      Who is going to teach courses such as these, pray tell? Who is going to develop the curriculum? What a joke.

      • St. Anger

        Teachers and the elected sboe, one hopes. You would prefer mark zuckerberg?

        • SeeItMyWay

          Go back to your pipe, Maddog.

          • St. Anger

            Sure, insults and no response

            Remind me why you think I am so poorly behaved?

            When you ask dumb questions …

          • SeeItMyWay

            I’m on your side on this issue, but your personal animas toward anything I post blinds you to it. You are “one of those” on the far extremes of both sides who will never do anything to work out problems. You are the type who truly starts wars.

          • St. Anger

            It’s not personal.

            I think ALL trump voters are selfish racist cowards.

          • SeeItMyWay

            Again….your response makes my point so much better than I ever could. You are “one of those”. I don’t hate you.

          • St. Anger

            Of course not. I’m white.

          • SeeItMyWay

            How would I know that? Have you ever said so? To me, you are just screwed up.

  • SeeItMyWay

    Several posting here think the new tax code’s deletion of taxes on foreign profits of multi-national U.S. based corporations represents an unkept campaign promise…that it makes it more attractive for these businesses to open more foreign based branches.

    This Bloomberg link at the end of my post explains that by dropping taxes on foreign based profits, these corporations can now move the money back into the U.S. for reinvestment. The key to this happening was the lowering of corporate tax rates on U.S. generated profits. The two work hand in hand.

    Naysayers are everywhere, and roadblocks are being erected in front of every major issue. False narratives also slow down Congressional function. In spite of all this, positive gains have been realized. Are U.S. citizens worse off than they were back two years ago on January 1st? Heck no, but the whining and wild prognostications continue. Only time will tell whether Trump’s moves will result in longterm debt reduction and a safer world.

    Here’s the Bloomberg piece:
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-03-04/u-s-companies-are-stashing-2-1-trillion-overseas-to-avoid-taxes

    • BCinBCS

      Without a doubt the new tax laws will make it easier to bring money back into the United States. Where the financial fallacy begins, however, is believing that, by moving this money back, corporations will use it for investments and worker pay raises. It’s not going to happen.

      Why?

      Prior to the tax change, if corporations wanted or needed money for investments, they could have used their foreign funds as collateral for loans at close to zero percent. They didn’t. The Republicans and you claim that they are going to pay taxes, which are greater than the interest rate of a collateralized loan in order to invest now? It just isn’t going to happen.

      And, it is pure fantasy to believe that corporations will use the imported funds to increase wages before they increase the salaries of their executives. Any remaining funds will be used to increase stockholder returns or to buy back stock.

      Now that the firms that have former executives in Comrade Trump’s cabinet or who are actively fluffing him in order to get a particular regulation changed have completed their very public, sycophantic display of giving bonuses, foreign funds will go to where conservatives know they belong, to the rich.

      • SeeItMyWay

        You speculate. After the tax bill was signed several major corps announced pay raises across the board, bonuses and intent to expand. Did you miss this announcement? Did you miss the link I posted on the CBS piece regarding how the new tax code was going to positively affect three diverse U.S. families? How are you worse off than you were 18 mos ago? You just keep on preaching doom and gloom that does not seem to be forthcoming.

        • BCinBCS

          After the tax bill was signed several major corps announced pay raises across the board, bonuses and intent to expand.

          “Now that the firms that have former executives in Comrade Trump’s cabinet or who are actively fluffing him in order to get a particular regulation changed have completed their very public, sycophantic display of giving bonuses, foreign funds will go to where conservatives know they belong, to the rich.”

          “…if corporations wanted or needed money for investments, they could have used their foreign funds as collateral for loans…”

          I’m not worse off than I was eighteen months ago because I am wealthy and the Republican tax plan does nothing but benefit me. The ones that need benefiting, however are my brothers and sisters and their children, my nieces and nephews, as well as all other middle- and lower-class citizens.

          I do not preach “doom and gloom”. What I argue is that the policies of conservatives are selfish and short-sighted. The U.S. will muddle through but you have to acknowledge that the plight of the “working man (and woman)” has severely deteriorated since the Reagan administration. I preach against continuing down this path toward an their goal of an oligarchy.

          • SeeItMyWay

            I ask the question to all Americans…are you better off than you were 18 mos ago? Do you think you are going to be even better off this next year?

          • BCinBCS

            Do you think you are going to be even better off this next year?

            No and neither will be the country.

            I do not know what you think is happening in the U.S. right now but unless you are very rich, you are losing.

            What happened to those Carrier plant employees? $7,000,000.00 to save 1,000 jobs and most of the jobs went to Mexico, anyway.

          • SpiritofPearl

            It was all a publicity stunt by the Game Show Host. In addition to losing the promised jobs, Indiana taxpayers got left holding the financial tax bag to pay for it (Mike Dense at work).

          • SeeItMyWay

            Yeah, only 800 Carrier jobs will stay in the U.S. and they are only going to invest $16M into the Indiana plant.

          • SeeItMyWay

            And you tell me I am reading the wrong stuff and listening to wrong channel? There are all sorts of positives that are being reported, some even by groups you watch and quote, yet you fail to acknowledge them. How long can you be in denial?

          • BCinBCS

            JJ: “How long can you be in denial?

            The economy is slowly but steadily recovering from the Great Recession. Luckily for us, Comrade Trump has been unable to screw up the economy any farther than the damage done by his tax redistribution bill. He has not changed a thing economically or financially beyond re-energizing the stock market. He is no miracle worker and he has produced no economic miracles.

            What Comrade Trump has done is eliminate many of the protective regulations that were in place, the most recent and well known being the elimination of net neutrality and internet privacy rules. If you think that government and your life should be controlled by big business, then you will be ecstatic by the end of Comrade Trump’s term.

            What Comrade Trump hasn’t done is make life better for the working- and middle-class. This is ironic because it was the working-class that got him elected. Unfortunately, his cabinet and economic advisors are mostly Goldman-Sachs executives and they couldn’t care less about the working-class (even if they knew any).

          • Jed

            better response would have been trendline that shows all the indicators JJ is relying on have only continued (or even diminished) trends that were in effect under obama (pick one: unemployment, stock market, gdp, etc). moreover, when the tax hike hits, JJ’s argument will be even less convincing.

            but one thing that hasn’t improved is income for the lower 99%. funny that the “populists” don’t seem concerned about that anymore. i’m not sure why a middle class worker would care much about the rise of stock prices that she doesn’t own, yet not care that what should have been her raise just got handed to the Big’s [sic].

          • BCinBCS

            That’s the situation spot-on, Jed. Exactly.

          • WUSRPH

            This is exactly the point that Too Sweet and I were making….past experience is that the money, if brought home, will be used for mergers, stock buy backs and dividends. That is what happened the last time there was a “tax holiday” for such foreign earnings. I regret that I did not explain that well enough….but, as I said, I was trying to keep it “Simple and Simplistic” for those whose take that approach to all questions.

          • SeeItMyWay

            Has anyone noticed that if WUSRPH posts on a subject describing “what’s going to happen” and you don’t buy into it and take up his position, then you are labeled “simple” and just not capable of keeping up with him?
            I’m not fond of people like him who climb up on pedestals like that. Root of problem.

  • WUSRPH

    I have a number of wishes and hopes for the New Year…..most of which, as usual, will not be achieved….BUT there I one I have for all of you who post on BB—–that being that those couple of posters who apparently cannot enter a discussion without winding up insulting and personally attacking others (you know who they are) could retrain themselves.. I know I will be attacked by both many times during the year…but it will have no effect on me since I have blocked both of them. But others still attempt to exchange comments with them, only to be insulted. It is too bad that the pair cannot control their behavior,..my hope is that they will at least try.

  • BCinBCS

    JJ, W is correct in that you have in the past reverted to ad hominem attacks when trying to make a point. To your credit, you have scaled back on the personal attacks but have exchanged them for generalized character attacks. Attacking the messenger does absolutely nothing to refute their message.

    I enjoy debating you and I, too, sometimes get frustrated and lash out. For that, I apologize.

    I hope that your plan for your extended family is more than a fantasy and that you are able to obtain your get-away. It sounds wonderful. Happy new year to you and to all here at BurkaBlog.

    • SeeItMyWay

      And to you.

    • WUSRPH

      He also makes up from his putrid imagination attacks on me that TOTALLY misstate the kinds of things I did for Bullock…..I was a researcher and spent the last five years running an internal legislative tracking and analysis system….I never engaged in any of the things he claims….but the truth has never been of concern to him.

      • SpiritofPearl

        He resents your expertise. It’s some kind of manhood battle in his mind.

    • SpiritofPearl

      JJ has a lot on his plate with respect to elder care and family care. When I was juggling four old people and a schizophrenic uncle, I was much younger and had more stamina than I do now. If I had to do that at my age, it would be harder.

      • SeeItMyWay

        I can handle it, Pearl. Would much rather be doing other things, but watched my folks tend to theirs for years, along with a divorced depressed aunt. A part of loving; a part of living; a show of respect. I am one lucky man. I’ve really enjoyed my life and still fired up about the part that’s left.

        I appreciate the fact that you have been there, seen it, and done it. You have my utmost respect. I still think I would enjoy sharing a bottle of wine with you and your husband. I do not bite.

  • WUSRPH

    The Texas Tribune has a complete list of the candidates for statewide and legislative, etc. races BUT what we need is an analysis of the legislative races as to who is radical right, etc. I hope RG can provide that.

  • WUSRPH

    Is there no end to the man’s megalomania? Now Trump is taking personal credit for their having been no airline deaths in the US last year…..He Alone is responsible….Of course, there haven’t been any since 2009….I guess tomorrow he will claim the credit for the fact that no one in the US did from a volcano explosion either.

    • BCinBCS

      The bit about Comrade Trump is sad but the part about God is even worse. It’s interesting that Johnathan Edwards believes that without God’s hand all sorts of bad things would happen. It seems more logical that, if God were holding back anything, it would be nothingness. Oh well, gotta keep the sheep scared in order to keep them in line.

      • SpiritofPearl

        Another chapter in the “Trump is mentally ill” book . . .

  • WUSRPH

    If anyone is interested in an insightful view of how the GOP might actually accomplish something next year without doing too much damage to America by actually adopting programs that might HELP common non-rich people, this article from The National Review might be of interest.

    http://www.nationalreview.com/article/455043/populist-republican-agenda-could-work-2018?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=180102_Jolt&utm_term=Jolt

    http://tinyurl.com/ybsvqjkx

    Of course, the author is a hopeless optimist who totally misjudges both the GOP in Congress and Trump, but it is nice to see that at least a few conservatives still are concerned about the general welfare.

    • BCinBCS

      As I read the article, I had a loud laugh, then several chuckles, then I realized that the author was serious. All that is necessary for his idea to work is for Comrade Trump’s words and actions to completely change so that his approval rating increases at least ten percentage points and then for the Republicans to team up with the Democrats to pass healthcare, infrastructure, immigration and financial reforms.

      Seriously?

      You were right, he is “a hopeless optimist who totally misjudges both the GOP in Congress and Trump”.

      That article was a waste of paper (or at least bits and bytes.)

      • WUSRPH

        The fact that such drastic changes would be necessary for these kinds of accomplishments to be achieved is a good indication of the mess the GOP and Trump are in….self-created of course….and how unlikely that things are going to improve. What is more likely is another “Year of Lost Opportunities” like 2007.

        http://www.nationalreview.c

        http://tinyurl.com/y832g9r6

        But, as I suggested in an earlier post, it will probably be in the best interests of the US that the GOP fail AGAIN and AGAIN and AGAIN.

        • BCinBCS

          Now that the Republicans have picked the low hanging fruit that is available through the fifty-one vote reconciliation process, they must begin to deal with the Democrats to pass legislation with a sixty-one vote majority. Beyond funding the government, reauthorizing CHIP and maybe doing something about DACA, I don’t see much that will be accomplished. But, as JJ says, we shall “wait and see”.

          • WUSRPH

            I suspect that funding the government will wind up being done thru a continuing series of temporary extensions, as it was this year. To get the 61 votes in the Senate for anything more than that will loose them too many votes in the House (and probably Cruz and a few others in the Senate.) DACA are probably doomed and CHIP may just be part of the extensions…..

          • BCinBCS

            “Happy times are here again…”
            /s

          • WUSRPH

            And America will probably be better off in the long run if that is what happens.

  • WUSRPH

    First he cannot help himself from threatening North Korea…..now it is Pakistan……What is that compels Trump to try to start fights with unstable NUCLEAR powers?

  • WUSRPH

    I wish people would stop complaining about all the time Trump spends playing golf. Just because he repeatedly attacked President Obama for playing a game or two and promised he would not does not mean he should be criticized for lying AGAIN. Think of it this way—-he can’t be doing the country that much harm while he’s on the course….

  • BCinBCS

    Yes, I did miss the CBS link. I assume that it was in one of the previous posts.

    You said to “wait and watch” when Trump was running for election; that he would pivot and become sane once elected. How’s that working out for you? Do you expect him to change now? You do know about the Einstein definition of insanity?

    • SeeItMyWay

      Au contraire, bon amie. I never said anything about Trump’s spots changing to strips; I said to hide and watch, and see if he kept promises and got anything done. He has, and there are many more positives than negatives in my mind to this point. He also has three more years to go. I know that grates on you and others. Now you know how I felt early on when Obama gave all those Wall Street execs a free walk…with bonuses to boot. Up to that point, I kept my comments to myself. Afterwards, he dropped a turd in my punchbowl on a regular basis, and I got vocal. I understand how you feel…I really do.

      • BCinBCS

        Gorsuch nominated to the Supreme Court.
        GOP tax redistribution to the wealthiest.

        What other major accomplishment has he had?

        • SeeItMyWay

          Turning decision making over to military with regards to the Middle East and the subsequent results.

          The hardline being taken in the U.N.

          Notice being served to trading partners.

          Three more years to go.

          • BCinBCS

            Turning decision making over to military with regards to the Middle East and the subsequent results.

            The main decisions that the military makes now that they didn’t before is whether to bomb and strafe the enemy when they are intermingled among civilians or using them as shields. This was rarely allowed before, it is now. This policy change has resulted in an astonishing increase in the deaths of old people, women and children.

            The hardline being taken in the U.N.

            I question this hard line when all of our allies are alienated by our actions. I was particularly tickled by the party that was given for the nine countries who voted with us on the recent Jerusalem as capital of Israel. I’m sure that Tongo and Palau boogied-down.

            Notice being served to trading partners.

            The greatest negotiator ever gave away preferred trade with all of Asia to China. NAFTA renegotiation is going nowhere. Maybe you were writing about our get tough policy with Puerto Rico.

            Three more years to go.

            I’m not even sure that’s correct. There’s an awful lot of talk about the Twenty-fifth Amendment going around. I find it incredible to comprehend but Comrade Trump’s collusion with the Russians and, especially, his blatant abuse of the Emolument’s Clause may foretell doom for his presidency.

          • SeeItMyWay

            ISIS is being decimated. It might be true that civilian casualties are going up? Got proof? War is hell.

            We should not be playing “go along to get along” at the U.N. For once in a long, long time, we’re not.

            We gave away nothing in Asia? Korea going to sell more cars to the Chinese than they already are? Japan going to get chopsticks from Tiawan? All those TV’s going to get dumped on Australia? You are really gullible, and if you think and indictment of Trump for collusion, not very bright either. They can’t find squat on him, but, if allowed, might spend the next 3 yrs trying.

          • BCinBCS

            O.K. you just keep on living in Trumplandia.
            As you say, just “hide and wait”.

        • SpiritofPearl

          Gorsuch was selected by the Federalist Society and railroaded by the GOP. Trump is clueless.

  • SeeItMyWay

    Just announced that American and Southwest Airlines are giving each employee a $1,000 bonus due to new tax code savings.

    • donuthin2

      wow, $1,000 is yuuuge in this day and time. They would much prefer a bonus than a pay raise.

      • SeeItMyWay

        Most are under union contracts that determine wages. I’m sure it will be coming up during the next negotiations.

        • Jed

          for such a savvy businessman, you are pure sucker.

          • SeeItMyWay

            Hahaha. Why are you even in this discussion? Hold off until we get into unemployment benefits.

      • BCinBCS

        $1000 is the same as an extra $19.23 per week in their paycheck. Now they can buy that car or a house.
        /s

  • WUSRPH

    Trump proclaimed that he was going to surround himself with “the best people”…..Now he is telling us that Manafort is a crook, Flynn is a liar and Bannon is crazy…..I wonder what that says about the rest of the people close to him.

  • BCinBCS

    O.K. just “hide and watch”.

    I’m not Trump lover, I’m a Hillary hater.

    No Dude, you’re a Comrade Trump lover. You may not realize it but you are.

    • SeeItMyWay

      Oh, I know the difference in love and indifference. As long as he keeps things moving in the right direction (as definded by me), I can live with Trump’s lunacy, and narcissism. It drives you crazy, I know. I went through 4 yrs of feeling that way.