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Jeff Sessions Likened El Paso to a War Zone

The U.S. Attorney General’s comments last week infuriated community leaders in El Paso.

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US Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks about organized gang violence at the Department of Justice, April 18, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Mark Wilson/Getty

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions visited El Paso last week as part of his tour of cities along the U.S.-Mexico border. Upon arrival, the former senator from Alabama promptly put his foot in his mouth. According to the El Paso Times, when Sessions addressed the media in El Paso he essentially likened the city to a war zone, using terms like “ground zero,” “beachhead,” and “the front lines.”

“As I learned first-hand last week in Nogales, it is here, on this sliver of land where we establish a beachhead against the cartels, against the transnational street gangs like MS-13, and the human traffickers,” Sessions told reporters after he and Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly met with federal agents and prosecutors in El Paso, according to the Times. “This is the ground. This is ground zero—this is the front lines, and this is where we are making our stand.”

In reality, El Paso is literally one of the safest cities in the country.

It topped Congressional Quarterly‘s list of the safest cities in America for four straight years from 2010 to 2014. Although those rankings are based on FBI statistics that shouldn’t necessarily be used to compare relative safety, they do show that crime is generally very low in El Paso. Oddly enough, Sessions also acknowledged El Paso’s low crime rates, saying that “El Paso has done a really good job of maintaining a lower violent crime rate than a lot of cities in the country and certainly a lot better than across the border.”

Sessions’s rhetoric seems to stem from President Donald Trump, who during his campaign infamously falsely said that most Mexican immigrants who come across the border are “rapists” and criminals. Multiple studies have shown that immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than people born in the United States. Sessions’s mischaracterization of El Paso feeds into the Trump administration’s priorities to deport millions of immigrants, bolster immigration enforcement agencies along the border, and build a costly wall.

The recent comments infuriated community leaders in El Paso, who didn’t take kindly to Sessions dubbing their city “ground zero” for Trump’s border war. “This language and rhetoric makes us less safe and makes it harder for a city like El Paso to attract talent and investments to continue to be successful,” El Paso Congressman Beto O’Rourke said, according to the Times. “The attorney general did not do us any favors today.” Hundreds of protesters gathered outside the federal building where Sessions spoke on Thursday, chanting, “Get out, Sessions!” and holding signs, according to the Times.

County Judge Veronica Escobar didn’t mince words, calling Session’s statements “offensive,” and adding that “it’s absolutely clear that the truth and the facts about the richness and significance of border communities, and the beauty of our immigrant families, makes absolutely no difference to them,” according to the Times. “By using language that connotes a war almost, by calling it a beachhead, by saying this is ground zero, this language causes incredible harm to our community. That language and that attitude and that rhetoric is un-American.”

Jon Barela, the head of the Borderplex Alliance, a regional economic development group for El Paso, Juárez, and New Mexico, shared those sentiments. “I am also disappointed by their coming to our region for a photo op and a press conference which carries false information,” Barela told the Times. “I would hope that next time they are visiting our region they have an opportunity to meet with business people and visit with companies that create hundreds of thousands of jobs in a vibrant and integrated economy on both sides of the border. If they were serious about understanding the region, they would know border trade and our economic relationship with Mexico is integral to job creation in the United States.”

Likewise, Richard Dayoub, president and CEO of the Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce, wasn’t too thrilled with Sessions’s visit. “We feel that his statements are regrettable and uninformed, and only does further damage to the entire southern border region,” Dayoub told the Times. “We are not ground zero.”

Sessions met privately with El Paso Mayor Oscar Leeser during the visit, and, from Leeser’s perspective at least, that meeting seemed to have gone pretty well. Leeser told El Paso ABC affiliate KVIA that he talked to Sessions about the importance for border cities like El Paso of maintaining a strong relationship with sister cities in Mexico. “I want people to understand how we live and I want them to understand the people of El Paso,” Leeser told KVIA. “That’s one of the things I wanted them to understand: we consider Juarez to be our neighbor and our friend. Washington makes decisions that impact El Paso and border cities and I wanted to make sure they understand El Paso. (Sessions) was willing to listen. He said the trip was very important to him and eye-opening.”

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  • AliceRice

    Hilarious. Has this man ever been to El Paso??? He needs to get out of his Alabama country bumpkin mode and visit the real world he is talking about.

    • FelliB

      Did you read the article? He DID visit. That was his reaction :/

      • AliceRice

        Bonkers. I’ve been to El Paso on my own many times. He is a country bumpkin from Alabama. They all don’t realize that Alabama is scarier by far than El Paso.

        • feedtherichtothepoor

          And how do you think Alabamans feel about you calling them Bumpkins, and they actually LIVE there !!!

        • Jayne Err

          Try living here in El Paso without ICE, a large Border Patrol, and Ft. Bliss. You would not like it.

          • AliceRice

            I would never suggest that. The only problem I have is that the Prez of the US is trying to FORCE local–yes locally paid police–should get involved in the federal issue of managing borders. WronGGG! The fed does not pay the local police to do this. Instead, the local taxpayers pay for their cops. Their cops should deal only with public safety, not with federally mandated border control. Again. We have to understand separation of powers in this country. If we don’t recognize the difference between federal border control and local police, we are screwed.

          • fed up tax payer

            They used to. Even helped ICE do raids on bussiness hiring illegals

          • AliceRice

            Yes, but that is a terrible idea for law enforcement. Cops focus on true criminals, not people who overstayed their visa or anything else. Crime is crime whether the person is Mexican, Caucasian, or anything else. Treat crime as crime, yes, but just spend all of their time running down people for the government without government payments? No. That is a total waste of a cop’s time and of taxpayer’s money. Besides, profiling someone only because of their race does not divide Mexicans from Americans. Many Mexicans were here generations before whites. They are a high percentage of U.S. citizens in border states since well before 1776. Why do we have to do this along racial or ethnic lines? That is simply against the U.S. Constitution. ICE and the Feds are by law responsible for borders.

          • fed up tax payer

            Well we don’t have to worry about it any longer since SB4 was voted on.

          • AliceRice

            That law, as I understand it, is just another way for the Republican mafia in this state to create an unbreakable chain of anti-government, anti-taxpayer actions that amount to little more than unconstitutional fascism at the expense of Texas taxpayers.

          • fed up tax payer

            First off a number of Homeless Veterans were laid to rest in Dallas but all the Democrat City Council and Mayor could do is co tinue on about illegals. Why cause that’s the biggest bsse of their illegal votes. Never mind the homeless vets are American Citizens. If Democrat want to pay for illegals fine but don’t use my tax money to do it. So if Democrat do t wish to follow laws then I guess I can stop paying any kind of taxes. Property. School since my kids all graduated.

          • AliceRice

            Most illegals are not actually breaking law, and most of them do pay taxes, including into the Social Security and Medicare funds they can never draw from. Second, the only people going on and on about illegals are the Republicans, who think somehow that it is a bigger deal than anything else. But it isn’t half as big as the veterans. Yes, we would very much like to help veterans and many of us do. Being in this country as a citizen is not illegal, and being here as a noncitizen amounts to a misdemeanor under the law. That is, it is not a crime. Crimes are rape, murder, theft, selling illegal substances, assault, terrorism, for example. Very few of these people fall under those headings because they want to stay in the country, and they KNOW they won’t be able to if they commit those crimes. That said, any criminal–true criminal–should go to jail regardless of their race, nationality, ethnicity, or anything else. I have frankly never met a single Democrat who thinks otherwise, and I know a lot of them. All of this silliness pointing fingers at people about things that simply are not factual is part of the problem–not the solution.

          • fed up tax payer

            Yeah and how much welfare do their anchor babiescollect they don’t pay in as much as they get in welfare.or pay for medical in hospital. So its time to end the fraud stolen ids. And the be of ripping families apart then don’t bring your family here or you can take your family back with you.

          • AliceRice

            Wrong. This whole thing about stolen IDs and blaming it on immigrants is insane. Russians and people in third-world countries steal those from our computers. In addition, our wonderful corporations sell our IDs to people who then use and abuse them. Those are the largest sources of ID theft. I know. Mine has been stolen multiple times from places like Target, Yahoo, and other sites. As for welfare, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp Program), nonemergency Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and its precursor, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), have been inaccessible to undocumented immigrants and people in the United States on temporary visas. Other countries have these same issues, people who immigrate who need some assistance, and they resolve it by requiring every resident in the country for more than 90 days to purchase medical insurance from that country, but since we don’t have public insurance issues resolved, we don’t even offer this. Yes, immigrants do get sick like everybody else. When we or they go to our hospitals without it, it is our fault as a citizen not to recognize the need for public insurance. Right now, it needs to be improved and turned into Medicare for All rather than given to expensive insurance companies to resolve. We know Medicare works, and it is reasonably priced because it is not corporately run. As for why some people of any stripe are poor and on welfare in this country?? They work two or three jobs, and companies don’t pay them enough to live. In fact, we found out that welfare really goes to the rich. Rich corporations like Wal-Mart, McDonald’s, and others actually have been caught telling their employees to sign up for food stamps and public assistance. Why? Because they don’t want to pay them a living wage. What do they do with the money they should be paying their employees to live? They pay themselves millions more and put it somewhere in a bank where it does not contribute to the economy. Paying poor people a living wage is the best stimulus program in the world for the economy because those people actually have to buy things. Rich people already have everything they need, and they do less for it.

          • fed up tax payer

            Well I will not hire a Spanish nor train one. Racist no I pay my guys well and provide them with trucks and tools. I have trained three African Americans. Who went on to start their own bussiness. One has been with our company 13 years. So you have your opinion I have mine.

          • AliceRice

            That’s fine. It would be nice to at least pretend to care about the U.S. Constitution, which says we will not discriminate against somebody on the basis of their race, creed, or ethnicity, but these days the Constitution is too much for some people. They really aren’t that American anymore, closer to Apartheid or something like it was in South Africa. As for who you hire, more Mexicans are staying in Mexico than ever before. They are declining in the U.S. by about 500,000 a year. Some industries are finding out it’s pretty hard to get a white male to build a house, install a roof, grow cops, cut up chickens, or slaughter animals. They also don’t want to flip burgers as much as black and Latinos either. When I was a child in another state decades ago, we paid white males $8.00 to $10.00 an hour to build something, which was much higher than minimum wage at the time. That is, the minimum wage was about $1.25 an hour. By that measure or a lesser one really, a white male builder these days would need at least $30 an hour to please him and meet his needs today. Many Mexican nationals, i.e., noncitizens, also clean toilets, homes, and offices for well less than the minimum wage, and you can’t find many white people interested in those jobs either.

          • Home

            You have got to be joking. They are filthy slobs. Maybe 3 generations ago a Mexican may have had work ethics. You need to open your eyes today! They leave poop paper on the floor in bathrooms for God sake. They leave there houses and yards trashed. Have you seen the trucks they bring over here??? Let’s not forget boys town and our children they abduct daily to take them there. That’s only the tip of the iceberg. 3rd world countries don’t mix well with modern society EVER

          • AliceRice

            You clearly do not know immigrants of any stripe. Do not judge others just because you know yourself to be less than many of them are.

          • Home

            I have Mexican friends who agree with me

          • Jed

            you are disgusting

          • Home

            Exactly my point

          • Home

            I grew up in Detroit. European immigrants were obviously here first. There are different types of cultures, if you can’t comprehend what culture is the Stfu. When you come from a poor country you are obviously used to being dirty and uneducated.

          • AliceRice

            Very sad for you that you do not know much of the world. I have traveled to poor countries and wealthy countries. You clearly think that somehow a poor person has to be dirty and uneducated. Many people from third-world countries are well-educated and clean. They just have oppressive governments. We, in the mean time, are supposed to be the educated, “clean” west, but we have many examples of people who have access to education but who have not taken advantage of it. We also have examples of many people who are culturally closed and ignorant by choice.

          • Home

            I honestly don’t care about the world. I care about MY country and my people. Perhaps you should try that yourself. If other countries also cared about there people then the United States wouldn’t have to hold there hand. I have been to every state but Oregon and Washington so I’m pretty well rounded as to what goes on in this country. I don’t care weather you are offended by me saying poor people are dirty or unkept because they choose too live that way period. I’m not going too judge them if that’s the way they choose too live But I most certainly will not choose too live that way and this is MY country I worked hard to make it nice, not to make it into a third world country

          • AliceRice

            The problem is that we can only improve our country by engaging in the world. Isolationism is why we do not understand ourselves. We are human beings, but we have let go of much of our humanity because we have been harsh and not allowed ourselves to have the things we have actually worked for. We don’t allow weakness, which is where we find strength and the ability to bond with one another. The U.S. has become unbonded, which is the recipe for falling apart. But the primary way we bond is through showing and sharing our weaknesses with each other and then trying to understand those who are different. Personal relationships with our communities can be the most bonding and strength-building elements of our society. It happens one person and one community at a time. As for cleanliness. Of course. Cleanliness is the best policy for anyone. But I find clean, intelligent people among all of the nations of the world. I am not offended by anything you have said. I just feel sorry for us as a nation that we are giving up our freedom, our way of life, our sense of justice and the human worth of all people all because we have lost our ability to share with each other in respect and to share with others who are different than us. People want to make immigration the key problem, but it isn’t. The problem is us.

          • Home

            Oh and also, I don’t clearly think a poor person has to be dirty and uneducated I KNOW THEY DO. you don’t really need statistics too realize if you can’t feed yourself or family it’s very likely you will not be as educated or clean. I was actually referring to the border cities bordering Mexico….. The cities are all filthy. Perhaps you should spend more time traveling there unless you live there of course. Likely you do because your reading and comprehending skills are lacking

          • AliceRice

            Insults will not improve anything. Yes, I have visited border towns repeatedly and seen the problems of poverty and lack of even basic human requirements. I admire anyone who seeks to improve their status because they have desire and ambition to do so. Just because the border towns are like that doesn’t mean that all of Mexico is like that or that the people desire that. Their are artists towns in the mountains that are clean and beautiful. Do I want to live in Mexico? No. I do not like the cartel situation, the criminal situation there anymore than I like it in Chicago or among the 800-plus domestic hate groups in this country. Judge people based on criminal activity, but don’t judge any person for the crimes of another person. I believe that people are innocent until proven guilty. Crime is unacceptable everywhere.

          • Jayne Err

            See right there, AliceRice. Under your rationale we should exploit the illegal aliens who will do labor jobs for super cheap – jobs that Americans absolutely would do if the companies/farms in question paid a fair wage or even minimum wage to begin with instead of paying illegals under the table and acting as a magnet to draw more illegals in. That makes no sense to me.

            As to the Constitution and what rights illegals have here, wow are you off base (as most liberals are on this issue). Anyone who is on our soil, legal or not, must have their CIVIL rights observed and protected, but no where in the Constitution or our subsequent laws does an illegal alien living here automatically have the rights of U.S. CITIZENSHIP – stop confusing which rights illegals are entitled to here.

            Under the Constitution we absolutely have the right to determine laws and benchmarks for legal naturalization. You should read the Constitution fully and stop putting out this hogwash that the Framers meant for every foreign born national who charges the border is our responsibility to feed, educate, house, clothe and their kids too.

            Whenever a question arises concerning an important issue such as immigration, the best and most reliable source for finding what this Nation should do in solving any problem that we face is to look to the Constitution.

            From The Constitution you and I love so much:

            Amendment 14, Section 1 – “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.”

            While there are only two specific references in the Constitution to immigration, stated in this most important of documents as , “naturalization, ” there is clear evidence by the Framers as to what they intended concerning the rights of the people who live in this country and how those rights affect immigrants both legal and illegal.

            The two references in the Constitution that specifically mention , “naturalization, ” are found in Article I, Section 8 in creating the authority of the Congress, “To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization.” Thus from a Constitutional stand point it is the responsibility of Congress to establish all laws and rules of naturalization or immigration. Well, they did establish immigration laws, AliceRice, and just because you want to ignore them and insist we all ignore them with you, that’s not gonna happen. Deal with it.

            The second reference is located in the 14th Amendment shown above stating that , “All persons born or naturalized in the United States,” are, “citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.”

            The key thought in the 14th Amendment which along with several other provisions established in the Constitution shows that the intent of the Framers was that only citizens of the United States are granted the rights and privileges of citizenship that are available in America.

            While Congress has the Constitutional authority to establish laws of naturalization or immigration they do not have a true Constitutional authority to create blanket legislation that allows non – citizens the rights of born or naturalized Americans. In other words amnesty is technically unconstitutional because it bypasses the laws which are established for immigrants to become American citizens.

            The beginning of the Preamble of the Constitution states clearly who gives authority to the government and in whom the rights established in the Constitution belong to and they are,” We the People of the United States.”

            The Framers clearly show that the laws governing this country as established in the Constitution and the rights that are available are for citizens of this land. Even the very Representation in our government from the President to the Congress are established that eligibility to hold public office is reserved for citizens only with the President required to be a natural born citizen of The United States and not a naturalized citizen.

            The Framers realized that once the freedoms and liberties that we have in this country became known to the world that The United States would become a melting pot of cultures and nationalities from all over the world. But they also understood the necessity of keeping our identity as Americans and in establishing a uniform rule of law for gaining citizenship in America and having as born and naturalized citizens the rights and privileges as an American.

          • SpiritofPearl

            A recent study indicated that 80-85% of new construction in Texas is done by immigrants of which about half are illegal. That means that roughly a third of all new construction in Texas is done by illegals.

            The hotel and restaurant industry is heavily staffed by illegals, as is meat packing, farming – Americans are oblivious to the economics of the underground economy, but you can be sure employers are.
            Many of those workers are exploited horribly – another dirty little secret we don’t hear about on Faux News.

            I would like to see a guest worker program that allows these workers to come out of the shadows. Allow them to negotiate a wage, stay for a period of time, then go back home, no citizenship path unless they choose it.

            And I’d never swim a river in Texas – water moccasins!

          • AliceRice

            We know many of those workers are exploited horribly. In fact, some of them are actually unpaid slaves, which is a problem. I agree totally with the guest worker idea, as long as they pay them equally with citizens. Corporations and companies are responsible for the work shortage for Americans, not the immigrants. We need to level the playing field for everyone so we can compete on the basis of work knowledge–not against the slave wages companies want. There are some jobs you can’t get the average citizen to do anyway though, paid or unpaid.

          • SpiritofPearl

            I would argue for paying illegals less, but allowing them to come out of the shadows. They would have a special status. Currently employers an stiff an illegal and the worker
            has no recourse. They are abused in many ways.

            Having lived in the midwest all my life, the past six years I’ve lived in Texas have been illuminating. The woman who cleans my house is a third-generation Latina. I’ve met her family, attended her wedding in McAllen, and learned their stories. The men who remodeled my house were also remarkable – working hard in the heat without complaints. They tell stories of “migranting,” moving all summer to different labor camps to pick produce and to keep food on the table. Few Anglos have ever done that!

          • Jayne Err

            Why should we allow lower than minimum wage for illegals? It’s exploitation and gaming the system against American workers. Why should companies be allowed to side-step legal minimum wage standards at all? And why should we make them “special” and reward that behavior?

            And yes, please check your 17th, 18th,and early 19th century history (or even read The Grapes of Wrath) there have been generations of Anglos who have done the same backbreaking work to build this country and put food on their family’s table. They built the skyscrapers of New York, the Hoover Dam, The Golden Gate Bridge. They migrated during the Dust Bowl years to find any work they could get. The volunteered to fight for our country during wartime. They were our grandparents and great-grandparents who did the back-breaking work under legal status and built a better future for their children and their children’s children here.

            There is a pathway for legal immigration for everyone who wants it, but most illegal Mexicans I’ve talked to over the years love their country and just want the money to send back to Mexico. Citizenship is entirely beside the point to them and they’d happily go back to their beautiful land (Mexico is actually very rich in natural resources and lovely) if it weren’t so badly mismanaged by the corrupt government there for generations.

            For the illegals that really do love America and want to be a part of the American Dream, all they have to do is apply or just have a naturalized family member here sponsor them over. And you know most of them do have family over here, they are all connected. Done deal. Family sponsorship is how waves of Armenians are doing it in L.A. right now. There really is no excuse for over 11 million illegals here, except they get a free pass from the left.

          • Jayne Err

            Why should we allow lower than minimum wage for illegals? It’s exploitation and gaming the system against American workers. Why should companies be allowed to side-step legal minimum wage standards at all? And why should we make them “special” and reward that behavior? Your arguments and suggestions for “remedies” are backward.
            And yes, please check your 17th, 18th,and early 19th century history (or even read The Grapes of Wrath) there have been generations of Anglos who have done the same backbreaking work to build this country and put food on their family’s table. They built the skyscrapers of New York, the Hoover Dam, The Golden Gate Bridge. They migrated during the Dust Bowl years to find any work they could get. The volunteered to fight for our country during wartime. They were our grandparents and great-grandparents who did the back-breaking work under legal status and built a better future for their children and their children’s children here. They are today’s homeless Vets with “Will work for FOOD” on their off-ramp signs.

            There is a pathway for legal immigration for everyone who wants it, but most illegal Mexicans I’ve talked to over the years love their country and just want the money to send back to Mexico. Citizenship is entirely beside the point to them and they’d happily go back to their beautiful land (Mexico is actually very rich in natural resources and lovely) if it weren’t so badly mismanaged by the corrupt government there for generations.

            For the illegals that really do love America and want to be a part of the American Dream, all they have to do is apply or just have a naturalized family member here sponsor them over. And you know most of them do have family over here, they are all typically connected somehow. Done deal. Family sponsorship is how waves of Armenians are doing it in L.A. right now. There really is no excuse for over 11 million illegals here, except they get a senseless free pass from the left.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Study economics. Free markets.

          • Jed

            “a Spanish”?

            christ.

          • Jayne Err

            The Russians (lol) and other criminals, et al, don’t force the illegal immigrants to seek out and procure fraudulent documents and IDs. You’d have us believe that illegal immigrants aren’t responsible for any of their own bad decisions. And no, it is not our job to pay for their healthcare when we can’t even pay for our own citizens and our veterans better care. And ask my parents about Medicare working well… Medicare is squeezing out benefits like crazy and not paying near what they used to. We have rocket science medicine thanks to the expensive R&D Americans are forced to pay pharmaceutical companies for our RXs yet we can’t afford more than 3rd world healthcare for ourselves in most cases because in part the illegals have been dragging the system down for decades. And Obamacare is imploding – it doesn’t work. And the bad economics you mention were exacerbated rather then solved for 8 years under the previous liberal socialist administration.

          • AliceRice

            First, most IDs are sold to unscrupulous people by corporations in this country–elite money launderers who make money illegally. Second I have seen few immigrants make bad decisions–only American haters who blame all their problems on somebody else. Thirdly, if we had a property functioning healthcare system, we would require all visitors to buy public insurance within 60 to 90 days of arrival. Fourth I have Medicare Parts A and B and a Part G supplement, and it pays 100 percent of my costs except the small annual deductible of less than $200.

            We have let drug companies do whatever they want. It is corporations screw us, not immigrants. We all know that we need to stop companies from raping the world like they did in the 1920s. The previous administration screwed up only from the perspective that they let corporations continue to suck excessive amounts of money through insurance and drug companies. Now we have the Russian mob and billionaires who made their money illegally running the country.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Are you aware that Rick Perry’s BFF, Lonnie Pilgrim of Pilgrim’s Pride Poultry, instructed his HR department to show undocumented workers how to use false SS numbers and other documents so he could pay them less than a citizen? And are you aware that he got a trivial fine for that?

            Stop blaming “leftists” for everything and open your eyes to what’s occurring in your own community and driven by your co-believers.

          • Jayne Err

            You can’t point at another wrong to prove you’re right. You love to say what you think and expect us to take it as fact. But you have zero evidence that Americans who need to make a wage wouldn’t do the jobs illegals are doing if they were paid the same fair, legal wage you want guest workers to get. I’m fine with a guest worker program, by the way, at least they are documents with real IDs and paying a real income tax. However, my codicil would be that they only get the work IF zero American’s apply for it.

          • SpiritofPearl

            So you deny the Pilgrim’s Pride case? It was widely reported in the press at the time it happened.

            Gotta give up the “youyouyou” approach.

          • Jayne Err

            Either you aren’t too quick on the uptake, Spirit, or you don’t bother to read replies fully. I didn’t bother to deny it. I said you can’t point at one wrong in order to justify the wrong you support. It’s pretty poor deflection on your part.

            I call out anyone on the left or right that takes advantage of the very bad, exploitive system that you wrongly advocate is so necessary and great.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Not as much as white citizens who comprise the largest percentage of welfare recipients.

            Are you willing to pay $10 for a tomato?

          • Jayne Err

            See right there, Spirit of Pearl. Under your rationale we should exploit the illegal aliens who will do labor jobs for super cheap that Americans absolutely would do if the companies/farms in question paid a fair wage or even minimum wage to begin with instead of paying illegals under the table and acting as a magnet to draw more in. That makes no sense to me.

          • Jed

            i agree with the first half of this and the second half of what pearl said.

            we should pay everyone a living wage, yes. and that means we should pay $10 for a tomato, yes.

            i don’t believe, however, that raising crop picking wages to $8/hour is going to change who does the job. do you seriously believe there are a bunch of american citizens sitting there offering to work on farms and are being turned away because the farmer won’t pay them minimum wage? that’s silly. where are they? show me one.

            like you, i oppose exploiting laborers while withholding citizenship from them. so in the end, we clearly agree, we should raise wages for all farm workers, grant them all citizenship, and pay a sustainable price for domestically produced goods.

            wow, whoda thunk we would agree?

          • Jayne Err

            We agree there’s been terrible exploitation of illegal aliens by the left and some greedy businesses. We disagree wildly on the remedy, of course.

            I have no idea how you can pretend to be so certain no Americans would do labor jobs if the pay was at least minimum wage. We’ve never cracked down on companies hiring illegals to give the idea of extending those jobs at minimum pay to our own citizens an honest shot. Mostly because the left pooh-poohs that the notion would never work like you are doing. If it doesn’t then, then, hey, just let the illegals swarm back in and we’ll keep looking the other way just the way the left wants us all to.

            In reality, our youngest legal age youths in the workforce are hungry for their first summer and part time jobs, and not just at McDonalds drive thrus and Walmart baggers. Also at carwashes and in rural area farms. Try cracking down on the businesses who pay illegals minor ducats under the table and make them pay at least minimum wage plus maybe some incentive bonuses for good performance and a path to promotion and watch younger Americans looking for entry level entre into the job market line up.

            A bit off topic but, while we’re at it, let’s crack down on all these bogus UNPAID job “internships” for young people that should never be allowed by the Labor Board – that’s even worse exploitation of our own youth who rarely get a job after interning for the “experience” because too many businesses are relying on an unpaid workforce of wave after wave of college interns. It’s a farce.

          • SpiritofPearl

            “Exploitation by the left”? It isn’t liberals running big factory farms.

            If you would resist the tendency to use “agitprop” verbiage, you might be credible. Unfortunately you descend into “Infowars” territory with each post. It’s a farce.

          • Jayne Err

            The left enables the exploitation by insisting there is no other way than to look the other way when illegals are allowed to fraudulently game the entire system for their own profit and at our expense. The left has fits about wanting to keep illegals working here at dumbed down wages. They actively block all efforts to change this exploitive dysfunction. I call out anyone left or right, who colludes with that.

            Ironically, if illegals actually got amnesty and became legal to work here, they’d lose better paying jobs to the illegals coming in behind them and be on drain on unemployment, like the workers they replaced. Behold the never-ending irony there.

            I’m very sorry you don’t like how I baldly tell the left how wrong they are, but I’m downright mild compared to how the left savages anyone who speaks or thinks or votes differently than they do. And after watching how the left has stomped all over the 1st Amendment at Berkeley over and over this year, including criminal violence, all I can say to the left is, “Hello pot, this is the kettle. You’re black!”

          • SpiritofPearl

            The primary beneficiary of illegal employment is Big Bidness including Herr Trump who employs temporary immigrant employees at Whiskey-A-Go-Go.

            I challenge you to find evidence that American citizens will work for the same low rate that undocumented workers will accept.

          • Jayne Err

            You should learn to read more closely. Of course Americans will not work for the same illegally dumbed down wage the illegals will accept. Why should they? There we’ve already agreed.

            My contention is that by cracking down on companies (whether or not they are BFFs with politicians on the left or the right) who are cheating by using illegal, cheap help and making those companies adhere to legal minimum wage or above to attract legal workers, we kill three birds with one stone:

            1. The corrupt exploitation of illegals stops – it’s become a way of life and the left helps perpetuate it with their stubborn denials it’s a bad system.
            2. The $ magnet that attracts illegals to stream over our border is nullified and they will stop coming over here with their kids (or to have their kids), leaving us only having to deal with illegals here who are motivated by drug profit.
            3. The unemployment rate dips and younger American emerging into the workforce, who would and can work for legal minimum wage because they are still being subsidized by their parents, have more opportunity for their first summer or part-time jobs.

            I challenge you to agree to try this plan and you’ll see evidence that it works far better than the current illegal immigrant scheme.

          • Jed

            americans who want to work for minimum wage on a farm can do so today. it’s not a hypothetical. do you seriously think the farming industry is turning them away?

          • SpiritofPearl

            If you believe Anglo Americans will do the back-breaking work that undocumented workers do here, you have been deceived. Even at a “fair” wage, Anglos simply won’t do the work. In order to attract citizens, the wage would have to be much higher and companies simply won’t pay that wage.

            Economics is your friend. $10 for a tomato, $100 for a pizza . . . think about that.

          • Jayne Err

            As long as you and people like you insist upon fictitious assertions about what jobs Americans (especially those students just entering the work force) would or wouldn’t do were it not for the illegal population and complicit businesses dumbing down wages, we’ll never get the chance to test your theory. I think it’s about time we see exactly what would happen if companies were made to pay a real wage and stop exploiting illegals while hurting the livelihoods of some Americans who would compete for those jobs. Or are you too frightened your rhetoric won’t hold water if it’s challenged in the real world.

            And supply side economics is my friend – A $100 pizza would never happen because of supply and demand and the ability to make my own way better pizza from scratch.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Economics is your friend.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Butbutbut the GOP resists a minimum wage law.

          • Jayne Err

            No, the GOP is fine with having a minimum wage law. There IS already a federal minimum wage law. Or hadn’t you heard?

          • SpiritofPearl

            Oh honey, you’re wasting my time. Adios!

          • Jayne Err

            Please explain how illegal aliens who come in illegally and stay for years illegally while often obtaining fraudulent IDs and SS# and often won’t get car insurance before they rear end my car on 1-10 are not “actually breaking the law”? A misdemeanor is not crime? Huh. Tell that to the judicial system. But very glad at least we both believe the illegal felons have to go, ha.

          • WestTexan70

            I’d wager a lot of $$ that you pay half of what I do in taxes.

          • fed up tax payer

            I would take that wager but unfortunately you would lose big time.

          • WestTexan70

            Ha!!

            You spend all your time posting on magazine comment boards. The Kochs don’t pay that well.

          • SpiritofPearl

            We pay property taxes for schools because we believe in free public education for all children, not just our own.

          • Jayne Err

            You should speak for yourself. You do not get to unilaterally allocate our tax dollars to illegals for the rest of us. That’s not what our tax dollars are for. Use your own wallet to plug that hole if you wish, and stop advocating that the government pick our pockets so you can feel good without actually doing any good.

          • Jed

            i think all this will eventually be found unconstitutional, although it may take a lifetime to get a reasonable court back in place to do it.

            you can’t tie federal funds for one thing to a required policy on another thing AND you can’t require that local law enforcement enforce federal law. each has been found unconstitutional on its own, and this is both together.

          • AliceRice

            Thanks Jed.

          • Jayne Err

            Yes, you’re right. It’s really tough to find a reasonable liberal judge on the 9th circuit court…not. Plenty of activist judges there who will agree with you, however, but you are confusing the word “reasonable” with “activist” court.

            In Gregg Jarrett’s words:
            Giving Sanctuary Is Against The Law.

            President Obama refused to take action against cities like San Francisco that shield illegal immigrants even after arrests or criminal convictions. He deliberately ignored existing federal law. The Illegal Immigration Reform Act of 1996 requires states and municipalities to cooperate with federal authorities on immigration requests:
            “A state or local government entity or official may not prohibit, or in any way restrict… sending to, or receiving from, the Immigration and Naturalization Service information regarding the citizenship or immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of any individual.” (8 U.S. Code, section 1373)

            That same law allowed President Obama to withhold federal financial support from those cities that continue to thwart the law. Yet, he took no action. If he had, perhaps Kate Steinle would be alive today.

            Even Obama’s own Justice Department seemed aghast at the then-president’s refusal to enforce the law. The DOJ’s Inspector General issued a report concluding that the policies and practices of sanctuary jurisdictions violate federal law and they are, therefore, ineligible for federal funds. The Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution gives primacy to federal law over contrary state or local laws. Did any of that matter to President Obama? Obviously not.

            If the carrot and stick approach fails to force city officials to abide by the law, perhaps President Trump should begin charging people with crimes. He can do so under another federal statute which makes it a felony to shield someone who is here illegally:
            “Any person who, knowing that an alien has come to the U.S. in violation of law, conceals, harbors, or shields from detection such alien in any place, including any building… shall be imprisoned not more than 5 years.” (8 U.S. Code, section 1324)
            Five years behind bars might give city officials pause to rethink their sanctuary philosophy. But there’s an added punishment written in the law: if someone dies because a city official decided not to comply with federal law, as in the Steinle case, the maximum penalty is life behind bars. I’m pretty sure that’ll get the attention of some sheriffs, police chiefs and mayors.

          • Jed

            ah, so you DO know what sophistry is.

          • Jayne Err

            You do tend to glom on to one word out of any given post and go on and on about it, Jed. It’s so much easier than coming up with actual intelligent, rational counterpoints, isn’t it? Troll on, good troll… Dismissed.

  • Dennis Williams

    While we are taking down old Confederate relics can we include Jeff Sessions as part of the project?

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  • bbetzen

    A scrolling fact check is coming to be a mandated necessity whenever a politician is speaking on any media. The known power of repeating lies is used too often in this political climate. That power can be controlled by the media.

    Lies claiming current lawlessness like this one about El Paso are simply repeated too often.

  • Cin5456

    Okay, last line of the article: [Sessions] said the trip was very important to him and eye-opening.”
    Response,: it doesn’t seem as if he had his eyes open while he was there. Or maybe he is just deaf and dumb. He is certainly handicapped by his association with #45.

  • Jayne Err

    No one even dares to visit or live Juarez anymore as we did in the 70s and 80s precisely because Juarez has become a very bloody, lawless horrific war zone. Juarez, a few yards away from us, our “sister city”, IS a war zone that HAS slipped over here from time to time with some murders and stray bullets across the Rio Grande (can’t even intertube in it like we used to). Were it not for the big presence of ICE, Border Control, and Ft. Bliss here that MESS would completely spill over the border and turn El Paso into the unsafest city and a war zone, too. Sessions isn’t a racist, ill-informed idiot for pointing this out, albeit somewhat clumsily. I’m tired of the obstructionist, blind, deaf and screamy left pretending there is no problem to defend against and insisting we joined them in that fantasyland or we’re all racists. Keep it up, please, because reasonable American need you keep right on losing election after election.

    • Karen De Anda

      First of all, a million people live in Juarez, so yes, people do “dare” to live there. Second of all, just because you don’t go to Juarez, doesn’t mean that nobody else does. There are thousands of border crossings regularly. Listen, no one is denying that Juarez is a violent city, but we are talking about El Paso.

      The reason that Mexico and all these other countries who are on the supply-side of the drug trade have become so violent is because of the DEMAND that the Global North has placed on drugs and the lack of policies that treat drug abuse as a public health issue here, and the money that goes toward further militarization rather than anti-poverty programs over there (money that comes from the United States, btw). That’s the point. If there are to be actual solutions to this issue, the real root of the problem has to be addressed, which is failed war on drugs policy. Policy that Mr. Sessions supports. Ask yourself, do you really feel so unsafe in El Paso? When is the last time you stepped foot in Juarez? I was there just yesterday, and not a single bullet hit me, can you believe that?

      • Jayne Err

        You’re victim blaming – it’s our fault Juarez is a violent city that continually tries to ship drugs in, hahahaha.

        So many bailed Juarez and fled since the early 2000s when the violence was uncontrollable over there, and many there with some money got sanctuary here and were allowed to bring their businesses (mostly food restaurants). A lot of poor over there got trapped and had nowhere to go, either in the U.S. or elsewhere in Mexico. But everyone agrees (well except for you who visited once apparently and thought it was all hunky dory so we don’t need to defend the border) that Juarez is still a dangerous place and that danger would not be contained over there unless we contain it rigorously. The government over there is pretty useless and often a corrupt part of the problem, so we get no substantial help there.

        No one wants to live in Juarez unless they don’t have a choice or are the among the numerous feuding criminals making a living there. Glad you didn’t get a bullet but trying staying staying in the street past dusk. No one does that, here or there, unless they are into foolish risks. And the daily border crossings are not tourists or workers from the U.S. trying to get in there, I can assure you, quite overwhelmingly the reverse.

        My point is that without a heavy ICE, Border Control, Ft. Bliss and EPPD presence on this side of the border, all that mayhem would absolutely spill over here far worse than it already has. The border should not be left unguarded on the U.S. side and thankfully the government is going to reinforce the border. And it’s already working, illegal crossings are dramatically down just by saying out loud we are going to rigorously defend the border and upload existing immigration laws. Sanity at last.

        • Bill Lewis

          I’m sure you like to read your posts, they sound so right on and all. However, the article is about El Paso, introducing the red herring makes you sound…oh well maybe you’ll get it.

          • Jayne Err

            I can boil it down so you don’t have to read so much. But it sounds like you need the practice.

          • Not So Spicy Russian Linda

            Well, your username is apt, anyway.

        • vjmassey

          Live there at your own risk.

      • Home

        Exactly quit victim blaming

    • Walter Marroquin Jr.

      I agree that border patrol has an important role in the safety of the community of El Paso, and I would add that the local police has also quite the job. Yet, calling Juarez a lawless and bloody horrific warzone is an incredibly and horribly misinformed comment. The city’s worst moments (in recent history) were between 2008 and 2012 approximately. The population in the city went down and people couldn’t go out of their homes at night. Many small businesses had to close shop and people that could afford it went to live across the border to El Paso, to prevent bad things from happening to their families or to themselves. Today many different businesses are thriving, there is no fear of going out to eat or have fun even downtown, there many cultural events happening all around like the picnic cinema at the Chamizal. Juarez may not be the safest city and there is definitely violence, but just as you would expect from a large city. Mexico City, New York, Los Angeles, and Washington D.C. are probably, if we look into it, less safe than Juarez (A lot larger too though). Yes it is a border crossing and therefore a point of entry into the US that needs safeguarding, but we need to safeguard ourselves from judgments out of fear, or feeding false ideas and misconceptions in our minds from the past today.

      • Dan Mitchell

        Well, read her comment history. She’s an enraged, blithering idiot.

        https://disqus.com/by/jayneerr/

        • Jayne Err

          Dan, lol, some day you will probably be a good troll. For now you’re just a predictable and boring liberal who, besides name-calling a stranger on the ‘net, can’t think how else to articulate whatever pointless point he’s trying to make.

          • Asher B. Garber

            I’ll go one better, Jayne. I imagine you as some unemployed white guy beating off his 3 inches of frustration on Disqus all day long.

            Have fun.

          • vjmassey

            Spot on.

      • Jayne Err

        Walter, I agree the police are also on the job when it comes to quelling the border problem, which is unfortunate since we need them to focus on crime issues on this side of the border and their focus is being pulled. I also agree the violence in Juarez fluctuates – but it has never righted itself to a degree where El Pasoans felt safe going over there as we did when it was a beautiful, welcoming place to eat, dance, see the races, go to the Pronoff, engage in commerce and so on. You may not be aware that for awhile the murders over there were coming over here, so it’s not unfounded to worry about that want to stop it. I’m not the first to call what’s happened over there a bloody war zone. I doubt I’ll be the last, sadly. However I’m not afraid or driven by fear. I’m merely very relieved that there are government officials willing finally to say aloud that borders need defending and we’re going to do it more rigorously. All I heard from the left the last several years is that anyone who claims there’s a big problem coming from our southern border is a “enraged, blithering idiot” (see Dan) and a racist, too. It’s about time people starting acknowledging the truth about this problem than keep naysaying it or saying it’s not so bad.

        • Walter Marroquin Jr.

          I guess I can understand the feeling of relief that comes from actions or words that acknowledge threats to our security, and provide answers or solutions to them as well. So we can say we agree on the importance of safety and safety measures that are needed to protect our families, and our cities and countries. Still, some of the solutions proposed (like the wall) and the way they are proposed feel more like a “we need to do it this way cause we said so”, and in order to justify it things do get called worse than they are. Also, I believe the wall is more a symbol than an effective measure, and could also have ecological drawbacks, and hurt the ecosystems of the Chihuahuan desert and other areas through out the border. I lived in El Paso while I was studying, since High School and until I finished college, and a little while after, working. I felt safe. Right now I live in Juarez with my parents and family and I feel as safe as I did across the border. I have seen the change and the growth in the city. Bad news are usually what make news, so its usually what people get to hear or read, but I would like to invite you to come visit Juarez again and see for yourself that the “bloody” war is over. We can’t deny the problems and we can’t deny we need to find solutions, but words can have a powerful impact on both El Paso and Juarez, and instead of helping them grow and develop, the kind of words that give a bad image to the border and to Mexico, can cause harm. This can lead in the end to the same problems growing, arising anew, or even the birth of new problems. So I just hope you get to visit and feel safe soon in Juarez too, and hope we can support things that lead to better and safer living conditions in this border. And I hope there are more good discussions and sharing of thoughts all over comment sections in the web haha.

          • Jayne Err

            Walter, I’m very glad you and your family are having better times in Juarez. I, too, went to high school and earned two degrees at UTEP, that lovely campus of higher learning on the hill that overlooked at that time some of the poorest shacks in Juarez. Sadly ironic.

            Reports I still get from friends over indicate it’s not “just as safe” as it is over here. I hope one day it may be. I may not agree with a solid wall across the southern border, either, but I do believe there are large sections that need to be reinforced. And I believe in taking the “welcome mat” for illegals away by not looking the other way and I’m not going to be shut up or ridiculed and heckled by the left who are not doing either population any good by condescending and shouting down opposing views on the matter.

            There is a legal path to citizenship for everyone, and our neighbors to the south can take that, if they wish. But I keep hearing “well that’s just not their culture” by the leftist illegal immigrant advocate/apologists, which seems mighty racist to me to paint a whole culture as being lawless. Peace.

          • vjmassey

            Excellent post.

          • Jayne Err

            Hey Walter, I put a thoughtful reply to you a couple days ago, for you brought up some good points. But Texas Monthly is dragging its heels at approving it for whatever reason. Peace to you and glad you are safe with your family.

          • Walter Marroquin Jr.

            Thank you Jayne! and I think I got it in my email so I read it, peace to you too.

        • vjmassey

          Who can disagree with this?

    • Jed

      “can’t even intertube in it like we used to”

      and a wall in the river would help your intertubing?

      • Jayne Err

        Good one, Jed! LOL, facetious sophistry much? Wall or no wall, we’ll never get to intertube in there again, unfortunately, thanks to the random drug runner gunfire from the Mexican bank where they are protecting their drug “territory.” So what’s a wall going to hurt really? However, there’s already a fence and a cleared no man’s land with spotlights as deterrent along the El Paso Rio Grande. Whether nor not a continuous, unbroken wall is needed along every square in of the border where there are already geographic “walls”of some kind in place, there are many, many unprotected gaps along there that need a monitored barrier. As a deterrent it will save lives on both sides. Just talking about stronger measures since the election has cut illegal crossings by 70% so if we actually do anything to bolster the border, it won’t be worth it to the damn Coyotes to try to bring illegals across and fewer illegals will die of thirst in the desert trying to gain unlawful entry here, too. To claim doing nothing to enhance border security or that there’s already “enough” border security, claiming no enhancement border security will do any good is patently false. A lie.

        • Jed

          i’m pretty sure you don’t know what sophistry is, other than a word used by conservative media to insult liberal arguments.

          sorry about your international intertubing. maybe just the one tube would work better?

          • Jayne Err

            Hmm, insults upon my intellect from a poster whose jeers and argument are as poor as his punctuation. Your house is so glass. buh-bye!

          • vjmassey

            Man with glass house should not throw stones. People just might throw back bricks.

        • vjmassey

          Does the military end up at the border?

    • vjmassey

      So true Jayne.

  • Mike Grunsten

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/28d2f441f5d3840c3b8c1cfdb3ecd5d40b80139556e7ba08d4493679dc1318a4.jpg

    Jeff Sessions may look like Granny Clampett, but that’s where the resemblance ends; Granny was smart.

    • AliceRice

      Haha! You are right on. Perfect.

  • Wilson James

    What you see is what you get with Sessions….a tiny, little man with all the hang ups and jealousies little men get from be passed over in the dodge ball line of life. He has found his power and uses it to pay back….sorta like the Cheeto. this is modern conservatism.

    • Bill Lewis

      Thank you. Well said!

    • Jayne Err

      Ah. The ineffective insult politics of the socialist left. Keep it up, by all means. The rest of us look forward to watching you all continue to lose election after election on that unintelligent, marshmallow platform.

      • vjmassey

        Good one Jayne.

      • Not So Spicy Russian Linda

        Hey, you enjoy your recession, hear? And remember, you can’t blame Obama for it.

  • fed up tax payer

    I like how Mexico law makers want to charge Americans to cross border. Just shows how dumb they are we can do the same.

    • WestTexan70

      Have you heard of punctuation?

      • Home

        Nope please explain….

        • Home

          Oh OK nvm. He missed a comma. Love you lonely grammar nazis

    • Home

      Who would want to cross that border???? Not me!

      • vjmassey

        Same here.

  • Home

    Never insult Hispanic people. They are always nasty about it. I have visited El paso Laredo, mission and every city in between. He is correct, I grew up in Detroit and Detroit looks like Disneyland compared to almost every city in Texas. You want to bring in people from 3rd world countries then it is going to look like one. It’s common sense period

    • SpiritofPearl

      Most people are “nasty” when they are insulted.

      • Home

        I mean insult as in, go against them. If you are not on there side it’s dirty looks and smart ass comments

    • vjmassey

      Interesting.

    • Not So Spicy Russian Linda

      I very much doubt that you’ve been anywhere in Texas, or Detroit.

      • Home

        I was born in Detroit and raised there. I’m a truck driver so I guess I haven’t been anywhere huh?

  • Home

    Yet again my comment was deleted. I’ll say it again. El paso, Laredo, mission are all holes in the ground. Unsafe drug cartel towns where little girls dissappear from into the human trafficking boys town across the border. I’ve been too every city in Texas and yes they are like Mexico. Dirty, filthy, non English speaking. The best part is the toilet paper with feces on it on the bathroom floor.

  • SpiritofPearl

    Here’s a chart showing the 50 most dangerous cities in the world. The most dangerous city in America is my home town, St. Louis, yet I visit there every year. I never swim in the Mississippi. El Paso is way down at 37:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_by_murder_rate

    • Jayne Err

      Again you missed the point – the only way El Paso can be one of the “safer” cities in America is because we have a very large amount of law enforcement (ICE, FBI, Border Control, EPPD, Ft. Bliss) task forces that are disproportionate to other cities not on a border and that markedly help to vigorously contain rank and file murderers, rapes, and drug feuds that happen daily across the Rio Grande. With THAT much firepower needed to keep us “safe” in El Paso, Sessions is not wrong in saying we are, in essence, a war zone on the front lines here. There is a real problem on the border, you’re just plain wrong to claim there’s not, and those here who denigrate people who are pointing out a self-evident fact that border cities have to be incredibly diligent to keep Mexico’s messes from spilling into their community are even more wrong-headed.

      • SpiritofPearl

        You have an aptly chosen screen name – “Err.”

        • Jayne Err

          Is that all you/ve got? I’m disappointed. But at least I have humility on my side. To err is human… You on the other hand, “Spirit,” are hardly being divine. At any rate, I’m not here to change the minds of brick walls who only have two arguments, “There’s NO problem on the borders or with illegals!” and “You’re inferior if you don’t believe what I believe!”

          • SpiritofPearl

            Ad hominem argument . . .

            I prefer those who have “just the facts, m’am” rather than personal insults.

            Read much, read widely, and liberate yourself from your prison of belief.

          • Jayne Err

            “You have an aptly chosen screen name – “Err.”” … You are projecting since you began the ad hominem insults. And then are surprised if anyone says something back.

            Try to free yourself from your own hypocrisy before you attempt preach false doctrine at others. Dismissed.

          • Jayne Err

            “You have an aptly chosen screen name – “Err.”” … You are projecting since you began the ad hominem insults. And then are surprised if anyone says something back.

            Try to free yourself from your own hypocrisy before you condescendingly attempt to preach false doctrine at others, “@NastyWoman2016” (<– you really chose a more apropos and telling handle for yourself with that one). Dismissed.

          • SpiritofPearl

            Snooping around on Disqus, eh?

            Blocking you . . . creepy stuff.

          • Jayne Err

            LOL, didn’t have to snoop far to find your Twitter handle, it’s at the top of our Disqus profiles, bubba.

            Have fun in your little bubble where no one disagrees with you, @NastyWoman2016!

          • vjmassey

            lol.

          • vjmassey

            Nice come back.

          • vjmassey

            You are divine.
            🙂

      • vjmassey

        What happens if they left?

  • John Young

    Well at least it’s a war zone when people like him pay us a visit. Folks down here are more concerned about Trump’s plans to expand, strengthen, and fund the Border Wall. So far, his plans look like they’ll decimate our border area financially, flood local communities come the next heavy rainfall (we’re due a hurricane or two), extinct some of our endangered species down here, and separate some land owners from parts of their land via eminent domain. See, for example, https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/noborderwall?source=feed_text&story_id=10154449301042124 and/or visit the Lower Rio Grande Valley Sierra Club on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/Lower-Rio-Grande-Valley-Sierra-Club-135992229800248/).

  • SpiritofPearl

    Why Americans won’t do the jobs undocumented workers will do:

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/05/08/exploitation-and-abuse-at-the-chicken-plant

  • vjmassey

    And did Obama ever visit the border?