Katy Vine

Katy Vine joined the editorial staff of Texas Monthly in 1997 and became a staff writer in 2002. She has written on a range of topics including the West fertilizer explosion, barbecue pit masters, Warren Jeffs, the moon landing, the Kilgore Rangerettes, bass fishing, a three-person family circus, chess prodigies, and a reclusive musician named Jandek. Her stories have appeared in the Best American Sports Writing 2005, the Best American Sports Writing 2006, and Best Food Writing 2011. Her 2005 feature story about an Odessa prostitution parlor was the inspiration for the Lifetime television series “The Client List.” She has contributed to the Oxford American, the Texas Observer, and the radio program, “This American Life.”

 

Stories

The Class of 2017

The future according to third-graders.

The Glorie of Defeet

What Samir Patel learned in five years of not winning the national spelling bee (other than the root words of “eremacausis”).

The Glorie of Defeet

What Samir Patel learned in five years of not winning the national spelling bee (other than the root words of “eremacausis”).

Making Ice Cream

The CEO of Blue Bell gives us the scoop.

The Music Man

How Dirk Fowler became the state’s latest, greatest poster artist.

Catherine Rohr

A pro at helping cons.

Sixth Street and Lamar Boulevard, Austin

Sixth Street and Lamar Boulevard, Austin.

“Oh, My God! It’s Our Children!”

On March 18, 1937, the residents of New London, southeast of Tyler, endured the worst small-town tragedy in U.S. history: an explosion at the combined junior-senior high school that killed some three hundred students and teachers.

Barrel Racing

Martha Josey on the basics of barrel racing.

Check Mates

Fernando Spada and Fernando Mendez are the Karpov and Kasparov of Brownsville: chess champions whose lifelong competition has produced a rivalry every bit as fierce as those of Ali and Frazier, McEnroe and Borg, or Nicklaus and Palmer. Did I mention that they’re in the fourth grade?

Acting Up

At the Giddings State School, violent teenagers come to terms with their horrific crimes—and learn how to avoid committing them again—through role-playing exercises in a jailhouse version of group therapy. This is what your tax dollars are paying for? Well, it works. For a while, at least.

Shabby Chic

Will the upscale shoppers of Plano really buy what Wal-Mart is selling?

Gone in 15 Minutes

How the fire to end all fires obliterated Ringgold—and how residents of the tiny North Texas town are putting their lives back together.

Whose Life Is It Anyway?

Katie Wernecke is many things: a precocious, freckle-faced Bible-drill champ; the valedictorian of her seventh-grade class in Banquete; and—since she was diagnosed with cancer last year—a pawn in the custody battle that pits her parents against the State of Texas.

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