Being Texan

Texas History|
February 1, 1987

The Empress of Fort Worth

Anne Bass married one of the richest men in America. With his money and her ambition she became an important cultural force in Fort Worth and New York. Life was perfect. Then her husband left her.

Being Texan|
January 1, 1987

No Promises

For eight years, I had a love affair with Houston. When the good times ended, we drifted apart. But while it lasted, we had the time of our lives.

Style & Design|
January 1, 1986

Lone Star Shtick

Part of it was my fault. But I insist on sharing the blame with Tommy Tune, Judi Buie, Dan Jenkins, Mort Cooperman, Dandy Don Meredith, New York Daily News gossip columnist Liz Smith, a terrible—and now mercifully defunct—restaurant called the Dallas Cowboy, numerous Texas-based kicker-pickers like Willie Nelson, Jerry

Being Texan|
December 1, 1985

The Week of the Virgin

A doll-like statue of sugar-cane fiber and clay came to San Antonio from a village in Mexico. Twenty-four hours a day, residents of the West Side visited Our Lady of San Juan de los Lagos.

Being Texan|
November 1, 1985

Preacher’s Kids

My father had to have an answer for everything—adultery, spiritual crises, the pigeons defecating in the church gutter. No wonder I didn’t become a preacher. The miracle is that my sister did.

Being Texan|
April 1, 1985

Mikey

He left his parents’ house in search of a world where things were black and white, where there were heroes and villains. What he found in the slums of Port Arthur was a world that would tolerate people like him-and take advantage of them.

Business|
February 1, 1985

The Last Roundup

“When the cowboys on the 06 ranch talked about losing a way of life, they often pointed to their neighbor, Clayton Williams, as an example of what they meant. He was a millionaire and an oilman, and he represented everything they hated.”

Art|
September 30, 1984

Coppini the Great

Pompeo Coppini’s heroic sculptures and European air were just what Texas’ fledgling gentry was hungry for in 1901. Since then his name has faded from memory, but his works endure.

Being Texan|
May 31, 1984

Last Respects

The death of Uncle Henry saddened my whole far-flung family, but the gathering at his funeral was an occasion for telling stories and recalling the joys of a small-town upbringing.

Being Texan|
April 1, 1984

The Hub Cafe

It wasn’t the classiest place in Pharr to grow up, but it had tough truckers, sassy waitresses, and some of the best fry cooks in the Valley.

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