Texas History 101

Most of Mason's history is as quiet and agreeable as the modern-day town, but the late nineteenth—century Hoodoo War was the exception to the rule.

Texas History 101

Most of Mason’s history is as quiet and agreeable as the modern-day town, but the late nineteenth—century Hoodoo War was the exception to the rule.

by Jordan Breal

TODAY MASON IS A QUIET town in the Hill Country. With a humble population of a little more than two thousand, most everybody knows most everybody else. When Texas Monthly writer-at-large Suzy Banks passed through recently, she dubbed several local establishments (the Beeswax Company, the Mason Country Opry, and the Santos Taqueria) worthy enough to be on her list of 25 things she loves about the Hill Country, which is in this month’s issue ( see “Head for the Hills”). To those of us who have never been to Mason—and perhaps to those who live there too—it seems an idyllic place, as calm as a monastery and untainted by the whir of chain restaurants and Super Wal-Marts.

But the neighborhoods weren’t always so unruffled, the neighbors not always, well, so neighborly. In fact, Mason, the county seat of Mason County, was a full-out battleground in the 1870’s. We’ve all heard of the Battle of San Jacinto and of the doomed heroism at the Alamo, but the

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