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Touts

Jul 31, 1973 By Texas Monthly

The Real Thing While billows of smoke encircle the Holmes Road dump, the City of Houston atones somewhat for its ecological sins by its production of Hou-Actinite, a remarkable 100 per cent organic fertilizer which is recycled at the Northside Waste Water Control Facility from city waste water and raw…

Briar Patch

Jul 31, 1973 By Texas Monthly

THE SPACEMAN’S LAST GASP CRAIG RASPBERRY IS NINE YEARS OLD and strikingly reminiscent of Mr. Peabody’s pet boy Sherman on the old Bullwinkle show, down to an air of scientific detachment which seems to be a trait he shares with his fellow citizens of Aurora, Texas, of whom there are…

Behind the Lines

Jul 31, 1973 By Gregory Curtis

MANY OF THE ARTICLES IN this issue are, in one way or another, about crime. It seems we have opened Pandora’s box. Returning from lunch one day we found that the offices next to ours had been burglarized. The next afternoon we got a call from Al Reinert, who has…

The Big Thicket Tangle

Jun 30, 1973 By Al Reinert

Take 3 million acres, add politicians, lumber companies and Time, Inc., and what have you got? A very small park, or no park at all.

Briar Patch

Jun 30, 1973 By Dave McNeely, Jamie Frucht and joanfilvaroff

TUBAL LIBATIONS FORMALS WORN BRALESS. SMILES GOING the full count. ‘Hair done’ and flown in for the occasion. Rosalind Russell doing an inspired Bert Parks. What more could a mother of four or a young career girl or a grandma want? All of us females were glued to the…

Touts

Jun 30, 1973 By Texas Monthly

Fiddle-Faddle Fiddler’s festival? A hillside field and a lake would be the perfect setting. But now they’ve covered it over with a shopping center and a parking lot. Seminary South isn’t country heaven, but it’s all right for a shopping center—it has lots of grass and flowers and trees…

Behind the Lines

Jun 30, 1973 By William Broyles

TWO MONTHS AGO IN OUR story “Sex and Politics” we took an affectionate, if irreverent, look at a side of our political traditions that is as old as politics itself, but which has rarely been discussed in public. This month we wrap up the latest session of the Texas Legislature…

The Big Thicket Tangle

Jun 30, 1973 By Al Reinert

Take 3 million acres, add politicians, lumber companies and Time, Inc., and what have you got? A very small park, or no park at all.

Inside The Lobby

Jun 30, 1973 By Richard West

These veterans of endless smoke-filled rooms and committee sessions do more to shape state government than most elected officials. They're not all bad, but they're not all good, either.

Touts

May 31, 1973 By Griffin Smith Jr.

Cute Toot-Toot Amtrak notwithstanding, countless unfulfilled railroad buffs still reside in Texas. For these unsatiated appetites, a genuine “little railroad that could” still makes daily runs in East Texas. The Moscow, Camden & San Augustine Railroad was begun in 1927 as passenger service between the sawmill town of Camden and…

Behind The Lines

May 31, 1973 By William Broyles

THIS ISSUE TELLS OUR READERS how to enjoy Texas in the summer. That we could so easily be urging Texans to enjoy summer is a testimony to how summers have changed. It wasn’t so long ago that a Texas summer was as inhospitable to normal human existence as a 40-inch…

Briar Patch

May 31, 1973 By Gregory Curtis, Wendy Meyer and Allan Turner

THE SIN OF AUSTIN IN AUSTIN RECENTLY, DURING A public hearing on skinnydipping in Lake Travis, local resident Louis Steinbach testified to attentive city councilmen: “God has the power to destroy this city for its sin…and officials had better realize it.” We do not want to appear soft on sin,…

Briar Patch

Apr 30, 1973 By Jan Reid and Jamie Frucht

THE GETAWAY THAT DIDN’T LAST ON A COOL EVENING IN late spring, Mark Jones and Francisco Perez entered Joseph’s Foodliner, a small market in northwest San Antonio specializing in homemade egg rolls (4 for a dollar) and fresh Chinese snow peas. Young, longhaired, bearded, they had apparently charted an ambitious…

Touts

Apr 30, 1973 By Griffin Smith Jr.

Comic Relief The 1970’s have Peanuts, the 1860’s had Dickens’ latest novel, but in the 1920’s and ’30’s nothing could quite match the goings-on in Krazy Kat, George Herriman’s celebrated comic strip. Millions of inveterate fans (including President Woodrow Wilson) followed the daily adventures of the noble-minded, simple-minded Kat,…

Sex and Politics

Apr 30, 1973 By Bill Brammer

Right here in Austin and right up there in Washington, our men who stand for office have been messin' around.