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News & Politics|
April 30, 1974

Consumer Aid for Fort Worth

This month’s H. Rap Brown “Power to the People” award is shared by the Fort Worth Junior Bar and the Council of Jewish Women for making it possible, through donations, for Tarrant County to have one of Attorney General John Hill’s regional consumer protection offices.The funds will pay for office

Arts & Entertainment|
April 30, 1974

Houston TV Ratings War

Fade in, interior six p.m. news set, long shot. As the picture comes closer, the familiar anchormen are relaxed and exchanging easy glances, preparing to bring you the latest news, sports, and weather. If you are standing close to the producer, you can hear the purr of his ulcer as

Politics & Policy|
April 30, 1974

Connally Stumps Ohio

From former Dallas Times Herald reporter Tracey Smith comes this report of former governor John Connally on the banquet circuit in Bowling Green, Ohio. Smith is a Kiplinger Journalism Fellow at Ohio State University.Like other converts to a new faith, John B. Connally has become rabidly dogmatic in professing allegiance

Business|
April 30, 1974

Trolleys for Austin

Austin, a city of great natural beauty, with the Colorado River gliding by south of downtown and the pleasing congruence of hills and lakes flanking its west side, has a unique chance to beautify and humanize its central business district.Led by architect David Graeber, the East Sixth Conservation Society is

News & Politics|
April 30, 1974

Folk Medicine for Fort Worth

True to its own particular, relaxed style of life, Fort Worth was a late participant in the city festival field. For years, Tyler has held its Rose Festival; San Antonio, its Fiesta; El Paso, its Charro Days, and Austin, its Aqua Festival. Houston and Dallas have long since become too

Books|
April 30, 1974

Texas Writers Recognized

Recently at a banquet at the Sheraton-Fort Worth, the Texas Institute of Letters announced its 1973 awards for literary excellence. Here are the winners:. . . The Carr P. Collins Award for the best nonfiction book: Lewis L. Gould for Progressives and Prohibitionists, Texas Democrats in the Wilson Era.. .

News & Politics|
April 30, 1974

Dallas Radio Goes Public

Beginning at the end of May or early June, Dallasites will have a new and unique radio station. KERA-FM, 90.1 on the dial, will be the city’s first public radio outlet and will provide a welcome relief from the inane, shrill banter of jingles and jive from the top-40 jocks

News & Politics|
April 30, 1974

NBC Moves Uptown

Now that the Skylab space project is finished, NBC has moved from its cubicle at the Nassau Motor Hotel across from NASA to new offices at 4615 Southwest Freeway. They are only ten minutes from their affiliate station, KPRC-TV, where they can use Channel 2’s nine projectors, eight videotape machines,

Meanwhile, in Texas|
April 30, 1974

Low Talk

Ben Barnes’ decision to reenter politics is not a question of whether to, but of which party. Fort Worth attorney and Barnes’ closest friend Dee J. Kelly, says of the top vote-getter in Texas: “it is not a question of running again, but of which party to run in. He’s

Business|
April 30, 1974

The Avalon Drug Store

On a Saturday morning in January, 1971, three days before the inauguration of Governor Preston Smith and Lieutenant Governor Ben Barnes, the then-Assistant US Attorney Theo Pinson strolled into Houston’s Avalon Drug Store after a toot on the town, a bit disheveled but still resplendent in his midnight blue tuxedo,

Health|
April 30, 1974

Spinal Strategists

Vibrating vertebrae is not a disease; it is either a cure or not a cure. Our reporter turned her back to the whole subject.

The Stand Up Desk|
April 30, 1974

Behind the Lines

On a warm March morning we went looking for the grave of my great-great-grandmother Nancy Daugherty. My mother had visited the grave more than 40 years before, and remembered only that it was near the capitol and that a small iron fence encircled the plot. We found the grave amid

Politics & Policy|
March 31, 1974

Behind the Lines

We Texans have always seemed to drive more, and farther, and for perhaps stranger reasons, than just about anyone else. Young people in the bleak and monotonous landscapes of West and North Texas grew up accustomed to endless, aimless rides around the countryside and to regular trips into the cities

Critters|
March 31, 1974

Semi-Tuft

Forget your Dallas cowboys and your Houston Astros. Texas’ real champions count birds once a year at freeport. They’re not bird watchers, they’re birders. And therein lies a tail.

Politics & Policy|
March 31, 1974

Ross Perot: A Hero for Our Time

I see Ross Perot as a throwback, a distinct cousin to two types of 19th century mythical American heroes. In his deeds, Perot is as gargantuan—as wonderful and awful and ridiculous—as Davy Crockett. In his idealisms, Perot would fashion himself, and the rest of us, after one of the proper

Style & Design|
March 31, 1974

Touts

PEYTON PLACE COMES TO DALLAS Bill Peyton’s antiques, ranging from the most elaborate Louis XIV or Napoleonic pieces to funky wine presses, Coca-Cola mirrors, church pulpits, and pump organs, come from all over Europe in 40-foot containers, or from estates in Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. For 15 years he has

Travel & Outdoors|
March 31, 1974

Texas Monthly Reporter

JUSTICE IN EL PASO Southern California mystery writer Ross McDonald in his best book, The Goodby Look, has his world-weary private eye hero Lew Archer lament, “I have a secret passion for mercy . . . but justice is what keeps happening to people.” Richard Wheatley’s justice for filing

Behind the Lines|
March 31, 1974

Behind the Lines

We Texans have always seemed to drive more, and farther, and for perhaps stranger reasons, than just about anyone else. Young people in the bleak and monotonous landscapes of West and North Texas grew up accustomed to endless, aimless rides around the countryside and to regular trips into the

Art|
February 28, 1974

Touts

DEGAS IN DALLASBetter known for his paintings, the French Impressionist artist Edgar Degas saw only one of his seventy-three sculptures exhibited in his own lifetime. Admirers of his work today are more fortunate. Seventy pieces, on loan for the first time from New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, are currently

News & Politics|
February 28, 1974

Texas Monthly Reporter

SCARIEST MOVIE EVER?Austin movie makers Tobe Hooper and Kim Henkel have made what they hope is the classic horror thriller. Truly terrifying movies are rare indeed. The trick is not merely to shock by using music, gore, or weird beings, but to create an atmosphere of fear, a much harder

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