Barbecue

Nelsons BBQ
Nelson’s BBQ

Jan 18, 2018 By Daniel Vaughn

With a sandwich like the Nasty Nate and impressive barbecue, this one-man show in San Antonio has earned a loyal following.

Black Board Bar-B-Q
Black Board Bar-B-Q

Jan 17, 2018 By Daniel Vaughn

Write it down: This new Sisterdale joint, which does more than barbecue, picks up where the memorable Maywald's left off.

The Texanist

Jan 14, 2015 By David Courtney

Our estimable advice columnist on buildin’ a fire pit, dressin’ like an oilman, plannin’ a destination wedding (or not), and lettin’ go of a non-barbecue-lovin’ woman.  

The Politics of Chili

Dec 8, 2013 By brian sweany and Paul Burka

With a little luck--and some perfectly smoked brisket--the 84th Legislature will correct a longstanding wrong and make barbecue the official state dish.

Bowl of Dread

Nov 12, 2013 By Paul Burka

I was aghast when chili was first anointed our official state dish. More than 35 years later, my feelings about this greasy mush haven't changed.

Ask The Wanderer: Hill Country Antiquing & BBQ

Mar 6, 2013 By Jordan Breal

Coming to Austin and want a break from SXSW's landscape of rock shows and long lines? Here are a few small towns, just a stone's throw away, offering some of the state's best barbecue and most charming pieces of the past. 

Bringing Brisket to New York the Right Way

Jan 21, 2013 By Jason Cohen

Daniel Delaney, a Brooklyn-based blogger who professes a deep and profound respect for Texas barbecue, bought a 200-pound smoker and a truckload's worth of Texas post oak to start Brisket Lab in his home state. 

Reinventing Barbecue

Jan 21, 2013 By Jim Shahin

Where there's smoke, there's non-traditional barbecue. Jim Shahin writes about Asian styles in New York City, "pulled squash" in Arizona, and cauliflower, artichokes, and quail in Texas.

Ode to . . .

Jan 20, 2013 By Texas Monthly

Ode To Brisket When you’re a food writer, people are always asking about the best meal you’ve ever eaten. I know they’re expecting tales of an unforgettable lunch at Michel Bras or a poetic kaiseki meal in Kyoto or a beluga extravaganza on the banks of the Volga, but what…

Lockhart: Smitty’s Market

Jan 20, 2013 By Patricia Sharpe

Don’t bother going in the front door. You’ll end up in the parking lot behind the boxy brick building anyway, doing the Smitty’s shuffle: At peak hours, the lines invariably stretch out the back door. Patiently, you inch your way forward, passing the waist-high brick pits and perusing the list…

Justin Timberlake sets his eyes on Austin barbecue scene

Dec 12, 2012 By Layne Lynch

According to a story in the Atlanta Business Chronicle, a new barbecue restaurant is coming to Austin in 2013. And this is no ordinary barbecue restaurant; it’s backed by Justin Timberlake. Yup, that Justin Timberlake… The Austin restaurant is part of a 30-city nationwide expansion…

A New Definition of Cow Tipping: Tell Us Your Favorite BBQ Joints!

Oct 17, 2012 By Patricia Sharpe

Dear barbecue buffs, fans, mavens, hounds, fanatics, cognoscenti, nuts, addicts, maniacs, aficionados, zealots, enthusiasts, devotes, groupies, and lovers: Do you have a barbecue destination that you think is worthy of being on Texas Monthly’s “The Top Fifty BBQ Joints in Texas” list? Now’s the time to tell us!…

Scott Roberts details The Salt Lick Cookbook

Aug 6, 2012 By Layne Lynch

You can’t talk about great Texas barbecue without mentioning Driftwood’s most famous barbecue joint of all time – The Salt Lick Bar-B-Que. Through the years this Central Texas haunt has gained both fame and popularity for its delicious barbecue meats – well known for their preparation…

Foodways Texas Is Getting Fat and Sassy

Mar 26, 2012 By Patricia Sharpe

Foodways Texas, which was founded in July 2010 “to preserve, promote, and celebrate the diverse food cultures of Texas," held its second annual symposium in Austin this past weekend. A couple of hundred participants listened to talks on the theme of “Texas Preserved”—a deliberately wide-ranging topic that covered cocktails, the drought, cattle, sugar plantations, heritage pigs, beer, shrimp boats, oysters, “trash fish,” and even mayhaw jelly. Attendees also ate, very, very well, from a brisket dinner catered by Austin ‘cue maestro John Mueller (with sides by Hoover’s Cooking) to the recreation of a Texas farm dinner circa 1840 at Boggy Creek Farm. The main course at the latter feast consisted of succulent grilled Red Wattle pigs (a heritage breed) provided by Revival Market in Houston; the chef for the occasion was Sonya Cote of Austin’s East Side Showroom and the brand new Hillside Farmacy. Here are four choice moments from the nearly two-dozen presentations at the symposium: "Two generations ago Texas housewives could buy sugar grown, refined, and packaged in Texas. The brand was Imperial, and it was downright disloyal to buy anything else. But gradually the thriving Texas sugar cane industry collapsed. The cause of its slow death was a perfect storm of cane disease, bad weather, and cheap sugar from other countries, to name just three reasons. But today, sugar cane may be making a comeback in the Rio Grande Valley. Could Texas once again become a sugar belt—or sugar bowl?" - MM Pack, food writer and culinary historian, Austin, speaking on “A Short but Not Always Sweet History of Sugar in Texas.”

TMBBQFest Photo Gallery

Oct 31, 2011 By Jason Cohen

Mouse over for captions, or click for full-size image. See ya next year (or tomorrow at your favorite joint)!…