Environment

News & Politics |
June 30, 1996

Bone Dry

From water rationing to stricken crops, the current drought may be as devastating as the one in the early fifties—the time it never rained.

News & Politics |
June 30, 1996

Blown Away

Ninety-four years after the Goliad Tornado killed 114 people, why do we still ignore the warnings until it’s too late? A reflection on Texas’ worst twisters.

Energy |
February 1, 1996

Oil’s Well That Ends Well

It’s not enough to say that associate editor Helen Thorpe was a fish out of water while reporting her story on the new oil plays in the Gulf of Mexico (“Oil and Water,”). She was really a fish out of water on the water. Three different times, the 31-year-old,

Politics & Policy |
January 1, 1996

Bugging Out

Farmers in the Rio Grande Valley are reeling from last year’s crop disaster—and they don’t cotton to agriculture commissioner Rick Perry’s excuses.

Energy |
November 1, 1995

Crude Awakening

There’s black gold in the South American rain forest—lots of it. Can the oil companies get it out without ruining the jungle and the way of life of the Indians who live there? The perils of drilling in the heart of darkness.

Reporter |
April 30, 1995

Refinery Woe

Citizens groups in Corpus Christi blame pollution for high cance rates—but they must prove it.

Environment |
November 1, 1994

Sea Change

Unchecked growth of microscopic algae has muddied the water—and threatened the future—of Laguna Madre.

Business |
September 1, 1994

Bo Pilgrim

He invented the boneless breast and made his chicken a household name. But now his critics are out to roast him.

Environment |
January 1, 1994

Homing Instinct

How a Texas oil company took a mountain of coastal muck and created a cozy abode for whooping cranes.

Environment |
July 31, 1993

King Fish

One of the world’s magnificent game fish, tarpon are back in Texas waters. Can we keep them from disappearing again?

Environment |
December 1, 1992

Sludge Happens

New York sludge is being spread across West Texas. Opponents insist it’s evil filth; others say the smell means jobs.

Politics & Policy |
May 31, 1992

Westward H2O

THE SHOCK WAVES ARE BEGINNING to be felt from the Texas Water Commission’s decision that the Edwards Aquifer is an underground river—meaning that surface owners can’t use its water without a permit. Another state agency, the Water Development Board, was quick to dust off the old idea of transferring water

Books |
April 1, 1992

Having a Cow

Beyond Beef blames cattle for the decline of civilization—not to mention famine, pestilence, destruction, and death.

Environment |
March 1, 1991

Road Warriors

Texans used to litter like crazy; now the state’s get-tough-on-trash policy is cleaning up their act.

Environment |
May 31, 1990

One Tough Bird

After rescuing hundreds of birds from horrible deaths, a Midland woman has finally gained an ally in her war on open oil pits.

Business |
February 1, 1989

A Dirty, Rotten Mess

Every day each of us contributes five pounds to the growing mountain of garbage. Now the mountain looks like a volcano that’s threatening to erupt.

Environment |
February 1, 1989

Spot Market

Ranchers hate bobcats. Trappers love their pelts. Both parties have found that there’s more than one reason to skin a cat.

News & Politics |
November 1, 1988

This Water Is My Water

Cool, clear, and pure, it’s the bounty of the Edwards Aquifer, and if something isn’t done to limit pumping by Hill Country farmers and a thirsty San Antonio, it may also be dry.

Critters |
May 31, 1988

Swimming to Oblivion

Marine scientists have struggled for ten years to establish a new colony of ridley sea turtles on South Padre Islands. All their efforts may have been in vain.

Texas History |
August 1, 1985

Isle Without End

An early castaway described Padre Island as “a wretched, barren sandbank.” It’s better known today as the Gold Coast of Texas, but its identity is still rooted in wildness and age-old solitude.

Business |
November 1, 1984

Trashy Business

When Houston’s rich and powerful join forces with environmentalists to battle big corporations, they can be fighting over only one thing. Garbage.

News & Politics |
September 30, 1984

Dust to Dust

The cattle are dying, the grass is gone, the ranchers are selling their land. The center of Texas is in a drought that may be the worst in a hundred years.

Environment |
September 30, 1984

Dead Oaks

Texas’ beloved live oaks are falling victim to a creeping fungus, and no one knows how to stop it.

Business |
May 1, 1984

High Noon at the Circle C

Gary Bradley, a hot young land speculator in Austin, was in the middle of a $50 million deal when he ran into an outraged environmental movement and a lobbyist with some powerful clients. The fight was on.

Environment |
November 1, 1981

Chucking the Piney Woods

Some people look at the Piney Woods and see paper plates and two-by-fours; others see the last great stands of forest in Texas.

Environment |
January 1, 1980

Terminal Case

Galveston has withstood tidal waves, hurricanes, gamblers, and tourists. Can it survive a superport?

News & Politics |
April 30, 1974

Folk Medicine for Fort Worth

True to its own particular, relaxed style of life, Fort Worth was a late participant in the city festival field. For years, Tyler has held its Rose Festival; San Antonio, its Fiesta; El Paso, its Charro Days, and Austin, its Aqua Festival. Houston and Dallas have long since become too