Health

Reporting and analysis about the innovation, trends, and business of medicine and health care

Health |
February 1, 1999

A Strike Against You

If your family has a history of cancer, are you doomed? Even though many of his relatives—including his famous father—succumbed to the disease, Mickey Mantle, Jr., didn’t think so. Then he got sick.

Health |
December 1, 1998

Killer C

If you had a blood transfusion before 1992 or have ever shared a needle, you could have hepatitis C. You may feel fine, but it could be killing you.

Health |
December 1, 1998

Addicted to Sex?

Even if you’re not, many Texans are: Sex Addicts Anonymous has 61 chapters across the state, tending to the tattered psyches of exhibitionists and other tormented souls.

Health |
May 31, 1998

Rx for Scandal

The poor quality of health care in the state’s penal system is enough to make you sick. Plus: Inside Tex Moncrief’s IRS mess; a River Oaks bookie is tried for murder; UT’s writing program achieves Texas-size success; and things get woolly for thestate’s mohair producers.

Health |
July 31, 1997

Food Fright

Eating a peanut shouldn’t be a particularly memorable experience, but for Dallasite Mona Cain and countless other allergic Americans, it’s a matter of life and death.

Health |
April 1, 1997

Blowin’ in the Wind

Itchy eyes, sore throat, runny nose: It must be allergy season. But what causes allergies? How do you pick a doctor? And what’s the best treatment? An in-depth look at an affliction that’s nothing to sneeze at.

Health |
March 1, 1997

Making Headway

At the Texas Woman’s University Aphasia Center in Dallas, a promising new treatment is helping stroke victims learn to read, write, and speak again.

Health |
January 1, 1997

Cancer Patience

To perfect a promising new gene therapy, doctors at Houston’s M. D. Anderson need time. Unfortunately, that’s one thing people with malignant brain tumors don’t have.

Health |
January 1, 1997

So Much to Learn, So Little Time

Today students at Southwestern Medical School in Dallas are expected to master more hard-core science than ever before. Yet after graduation, they’ll have to keep studying, and be counselors and business experts too. A hard look at the way we teach our doctors—and why it has had to change.

Health |
July 31, 1996

Spin Control

Vertigo isn’t just the stuff of Hitchcock thrillers—it’s a debilitating disease, as Dallas radio talk show host Kevin McCarthy found out the hard way.

Health |
March 1, 1996

Pale by Comparison

“Michael Jackson’s disease” sounds like a punch line, but the pigment-robbing skin disorder is no joke. Just ask Dallas County commissioner John Wiley Price.

Health |
January 1, 1996

Smooth Operator

You might say Tarek Souryal is the most important Dallas Maverick: He doesn’t score or rebound, but he reconstructs million-dollar ankles and knees, and that makes him a real team player.

Health |
November 1, 1995

The Real Medical Crisis

For reformers of the nations health-care system, ground zero may be Dallas’ Parkland Memorial Hospital, where the crush of uninsured patients with non-urgent complaints is affecting everyone’s care.

Health |
August 31, 1995

A New Low

Across the state, kids are getting seriously messed up on a dirt-cheap downer from Mexico.

Feature |
August 6, 1995

Silicone City

From invention to litigation, the breast implant has done more for Houston’s economy—and its psyche—than anything since oil.

Health |
July 31, 1995

A Perfect Mess

Can a suburban Dallas house-wife who suffers from obsessive-compulsive disorder ever overcome her fears? She doubts it.

Health |
March 1, 1993

Running Rabid

The nature and nightmarish potential of the rabies outbreak dawned on South Texans in late 1988 and early 1989, when coyotes were seen trotting through the streets of Rio Grande City. The first of these wayward animals crossed U.S 183, the town’s busy main drag, and sat down in…

Health |
January 1, 1993

Scarred

Not long after she made her trek from Texas to New York, Marla Hanson saw her modeling career end at the hands of a razor-wielding thug. Six years later, the cuts on her face have healed, but the emotional wounds remain.

Health |
September 30, 1992

Last Rights

My son ended his life after three years of madness and unbearable depression. Who am I to say he did the wrong thing?…

Health |
February 1, 1992

Are Men Necessary?

To hear some women tell it, nature created two genders, one nearly perfect and the other badly flawed. I wonder whether they’re right.

Health |
December 1, 1991

Light My Fire

After struggling to give up smoking, I have come to a compromise: Never smoke more than one cigarette—at a time.

Health |
May 31, 1990

Can Kids On Drugs Be Saved?

Drug treatment seldom works: at many centers, greedy entrepreneurs prey on frightened parents and troubled kids. But one teenager’s parents decided to take one last, desperate step: they sent their son to the toughest program in Texas.

Health |
December 1, 1986

Touch Me, Feel Me, Heal Me!

I was curious when I found that three of my friends had delved into the mysteries of psychic surgery. After three “bloody operations” of my own, I knew what it was all about. About $30 a minute.

Business |
November 1, 1984

Trashy Business

When Houston’s rich and powerful join forces with environmentalists to battle big corporations, they can be fighting over only one thing. Garbarge.

Health |
June 30, 1981

Fangs

Now is the time to unlearn everything you’ve ever heard about snakebite.

Health |
April 1, 1980

The Finish Line

As a doctor, Tony Seidenberg has become accustomed to death. Only this time it is different: he is the one who is dying.

Health |
April 1, 1979

Super Medicine

At the Texas Medical Center the best hospitals, doctors, researchers, and medical technology anywhere in the world have combined to transform doctors from healers into superstars.