Water

Get Thee to Water

Jun 16, 2016 By Dan Oko

We’ve mapped out nineteen places to cool off the way nature intended by swimming, wading, and diving into Texas’s restorative waterways.

How the Water Bill Dried Up

Apr 30, 2013 By brian sweany and Paul Burka

It was a wild night in the House yesterday as Democrats and Republicans battled over their respective priorities: water, for Republicans and education, for Democrats. The leadership could not get the votes for taking money out of the Rainy Day Fund for water—even though Perry came out for…

Water, Water, Everywhere?

Apr 29, 2013 By brian sweany and Paul Burka

Today is the pivotal moment of the session—a vote on HB 11, the funding bill for the water plan. The vote was preceded this afternoon by a meeting of the House Republican caucus, at which Rick Perry was in attendance. Afterward, he told reporters that the prudent…

The House That Straus Built

Mar 28, 2013 By brian sweany and Paul Burka

AP Photo | Eric Gay Joe Straus said at the beginning of the session that he was going to put the House to work on the state’s biggest problems, and he is making good on his vow. On Tuesday the House passed HB 5, a major public education…

Industrial Evolution

Jan 21, 2013 By Kate Galbraith

As much as anything, the Texas economic miracle depends on water. Lots of water. So what are all those power plants, refineries, and factories going to do as the state gets drier and drier and drier?

Drawing Straws

Jan 21, 2013 By Nate Blakeslee

The future is likely going to require us to move large amounts of water from wet but sparsely populated places (a.k.a. East Texas) to thirsty, booming cities. Good thing there’s a plan for that. There is a plan, right?

When the Sky Ran Dry

Jan 21, 2013 By John Burnett

Bad as the current drought is, it has yet to match the most arid spell in Texas history. Nearly two dozen survivors of the fifties drought remember the time it never rained.

The Truth About Texas: Water = Life

Jan 21, 2013 By Jake Silverstein

As last year’s historic drought reminded us, Texas has always lived life by the drop, just a few dry years away from a serious crisis. With our population expected to nearly double over the next fifty years, this situation is about to become more, not less, challenging. This month we look at the past, present, and future of water and drought in Texas and explore the solutions that give us hope.

Dry, the Beloved Country

Jan 21, 2013 By Jake Silverstein

The first serious coverage of water in TEXAS MONTHLY came just a couple months shy of our two-year anniversary, in a story by Greg Curtis entitled “Disaster, Part I. Lubbock is running out of water.” (A companion piece, “Disaster, Part II,” argued that Houston was sinking…

A Grain of Doubt

Mar 31, 2012 By Kate Galbraith

For more than 75 years, rice farmers in Matagorda County and elsewhere along the Gulf have shared the waters of the Colorado River with urban residents in the Hill Country. But with city centers booming and an almost-certain drought ahead, the state is being forced to choose between a water-intensive crop and a water-intensive population.

A Q&A With Kate Galbraith

Aug 31, 2011 By Abby Johnston

The Texas Tribune reporter on writing about the drought, learning about landscaping trends in Midland, and recognizing just how precious water is.

Blame It on No Rain

Aug 31, 2011 By Kate Galbraith

As the drought tightens its grip on Texas, its effects are being felt everywhere, from rivers to reservoirs to the formerly verdant lawns of Midland.

The Last Drop

Feb 1, 2008 By S. C. Gwynne

Texas has the country’s most precise state water plan. So how is it that every one of our major cities is still on track to run dry in the next fifty years?

Toilet Tales

Feb 1, 2008 By S. C. Gwynne

In summer months, Houstonians are drinking ice cold . . . toilet water. Courtesy of Dallas.

Water Grab

Jan 1, 1996 By Paul Burka

Why farmers and big-city folk are at war over water. Plus: Jane Nelson for comptroller?

Waterworld

Aug 31, 1995 By Helen Thorpe

Roberts County landowners are battling to save the Ogallala Aquifer—;and what remains of heir agrarian past.

Dust to Dust

Sep 30, 1984 By Suzanne Winckler

The cattle are dying, the grass is gone, the ranchers are selling their land. The center of Texas is in a drought that may be the worst in a hundred years.