Paul Burka

The dean of the Capitol press corps, senior executive editor Paul Burka joined the staff of Texas Monthly one year after the magazine’s founding, in 1973. For nearly forty years he has led the magazine’s political coverage and spearheaded its storied roundup of the Best and Worst Legislators each biennium. A lifelong Texan, he was born in Galveston, graduated from Rice University with a B.A. in history, and received a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.

Burka is a member of the State Bar of Texas and spent five years as an attorney with the Texas Legislature, where he served as counsel to the Senate Natural Resources Committee.

Burka won a National Magazine Award for reporting excellence in 1985 and the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel Award. He is a member of the Texas Institute of Letters and teaches at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also a frequent guest discussing politics on national news programs on MSNBC, Fox, NBC, and CNN.

Stories

Remembering Arthur "Buddy" Temple

His passing marks the end of an era in Texas.

Whither the Governor?

If you find out what Greg Abbott is up to, let the rest of us know.

What I’ve Learned

Paul Burka bids farewell to Texas Monthly—and wonders what happened to the Texas he once knew. 

The Next UT President

Who will lead the flagship campus when Bill Powers leaves in June?
 

The Monumental Ego

There’s one thing we can all agree on when it comes to Dan Patrick.

Bob Armstrong

His death is a loss to Texas.

Why Do Conservatives Hate Common Core?

What Greg Abbott’s nominee to the UT Board of Regents means for the state.

The End of the Two-Thirds Rule

On the first full day of the Dan Patrick era, he makes his mark on the Senate.

What If They Held an Inauguration (And Nobody Came)?

It’s the turnout, stupid.

The Last Forty Years--and the Future

The dean of the Capitol press corps announces his upcoming retirement from TEXAS MONTHLY.

Jeb Bush in 2016?

The “clear frontrunner” will be hard to beat. 

Finally, A Real Governor

Greg Abbott is off to a fast start—and that is good for Texas.

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