Paul Burka

The dean of the Capitol press corps, senior executive editor Paul Burka joined the staff of Texas Monthly one year after the magazine’s founding, in 1973. For nearly forty years he has led the magazine’s political coverage and spearheaded its storied roundup of the Best and Worst Legislators each biennium. A lifelong Texan, he was born in Galveston, graduated from Rice University with a B.A. in history, and received a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law.

Burka is a member of the State Bar of Texas and spent five years as an attorney with the Texas Legislature, where he served as counsel to the Senate Natural Resources Committee.

Burka won a National Magazine Award for reporting excellence in 1985 and the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel Award. He is a member of the Texas Institute of Letters and teaches at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also a frequent guest discussing politics on national news programs on MSNBC, Fox, NBC, and CNN.

Stories

The Year Everything Changed

If you think Texas is pretty much the same as it was ten years go, you’re wrong. Nineteen seventy-three remade the state overnight.

Jim Collins And The Armies Of The Faithful

Jim Collins is running for the Senate on the claim that it's better to be right (wing) than to pass bills. If he wins, it will change Texas politics.

Jim Collins And The Armies Of The Faithful

Jim Collins is running for the Senate on the claim that it's better to be right (wing) than to pass bills. If he wins, it will change Texas politics.

The Shape Of Things To Come

Ten key races in the war between the parties.

The King of the Forest

He’s Arthur Temple, Jr., ruler of a million acres of East Texas and the last of the timber barons.

The King of the Forest

He’s Arthur Temple, Jr., ruler of a million acres of East Texas and the last of the timber barons.

Trial by Technicality

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals confirms your worst fears about lawyers and judges and the impotence of the criminal justice system.

Trial by Technicality

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals confirms your worst fears about lawyers and judges and the impotence of the criminal justice system.

Trust Me, Just Sign Here.

Whenever you buy or sell a house, hundreds of dollars of your money goes for something called title insurance. Title insurance is a great deal—for the title company.

Trust Me, Just Sign Here.

Whenever you buy or sell a house, hundreds of dollars of your money goes for something called title insurance. Title insurance is a great deal—for the title company.

Losing Big

Everybody knows the story about the young Texan who goes into business, works hard, and makes millions. But what happens when his luck runs out?

Losing Big

Everybody knows the story about the young Texan who goes into business, works hard, and makes millions. But what happens when his luck runs out?

The Ten Best and The Ten Worst Legislators

Nineteen people you voted for and one you didn't.

The Subway That Ate Houston

The most expensive, amazing, dynamic, futuristic, and sexy way not to solve a transit crisis.

The Subway That Ate Houston

The most expensive, amazing, dynamic, futuristic, and sexy way not to solve a transit crisis.

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