Drought

A Mighty Wind

May 7, 2015 By Eric Benson

In drought-ravaged West Texas, cotton farmers find good omens in unlikely places.

Lucrative When Wet

Mar 18, 2015 By Loren Steffy

In an era of drought, tight finances, and a shrinking water park market, how does Schlitterbahn keep getting bigger?

Drought Kills Lakeside Business

Sep 20, 2013 By Jeff Beckham

When Lake Travis drops below 660 feet, visitor spending drops by up to $33.8 million, resulting in lost jobs and shuttered businesses. Carlos’n Charlie’s, a 500-plus-seat Mexican restaurant, is the latest casualty.

TM Informer: What Is Wildfire Season?

Jan 21, 2013 By Jason Cohen

The Texas Forest Service recently announced that the state’s current “wildfire season” may not end. The TM Informer answers the question, When does it usually start and finish?

Industrial Evolution

Jan 21, 2013 By Kate Galbraith

As much as anything, the Texas economic miracle depends on water. Lots of water. So what are all those power plants, refineries, and factories going to do as the state gets drier and drier and drier?

Drawing Straws

Jan 21, 2013 By Nate Blakeslee

The future is likely going to require us to move large amounts of water from wet but sparsely populated places (a.k.a. East Texas) to thirsty, booming cities. Good thing there’s a plan for that. There is a plan, right?

When the Sky Ran Dry

Jan 21, 2013 By John Burnett

Bad as the current drought is, it has yet to match the most arid spell in Texas history. Nearly two dozen survivors of the fifties drought remember the time it never rained.

The Truth About Texas: Water = Life

Jan 21, 2013 By Jake Silverstein

As last year’s historic drought reminded us, Texas has always lived life by the drop, just a few dry years away from a serious crisis. With our population expected to nearly double over the next fifty years, this situation is about to become more, not less, challenging. This month we look at the past, present, and future of water and drought in Texas and explore the solutions that give us hope.

Dry, the Beloved Country

Jan 21, 2013 By Jake Silverstein

The first serious coverage of water in TEXAS MONTHLY came just a couple months shy of our two-year anniversary, in a story by Greg Curtis entitled “Disaster, Part I. Lubbock is running out of water.” (A companion piece, “Disaster, Part II,” argued that Houston was sinking…

My, What a Big Bass You Have

Apr 10, 2012 By Emily Alvarado

Lake levels are down, but things just might be looking up for fishermen. Two thirteen-pounders were snagged from a depleted reservoir, and officials say there's more where they came from.

A Grain of Doubt

Mar 31, 2012 By Kate Galbraith

For more than 75 years, rice farmers in Matagorda County and elsewhere along the Gulf have shared the waters of the Colorado River with urban residents in the Hill Country. But with city centers booming and an almost-certain drought ahead, the state is being forced to choose between a water-intensive crop and a water-intensive population.

Trial by Fire

Dec 1, 2011 By Texas Monthly

It will be remembered as the year of smoke and devastation, as drought-fueled flames wreaked unprecedented havoc across Texas, from Bastrop County to Possum Kingdom. A photographic and oral history of the 2011 wildfires.

A Q&A With Kate Galbraith

Aug 31, 2011 By Abby Johnston

The Texas Tribune reporter on writing about the drought, learning about landscaping trends in Midland, and recognizing just how precious water is.

Blame It on No Rain

Aug 31, 2011 By Kate Galbraith

As the drought tightens its grip on Texas, its effects are being felt everywhere, from rivers to reservoirs to the formerly verdant lawns of Midland.

The Last Drop

Feb 1, 2008 By S. C. Gwynne

Texas has the country’s most precise state water plan. So how is it that every one of our major cities is still on track to run dry in the next fifty years?

Bone Dry

Jun 30, 1996 By Elmer Kelton

From water rationing to stricken crops, the current drought may be as devastating as the one in the early fifties—the time it never rained.

Dust to Dust

Sep 30, 1984 By Suzanne Winckler

The cattle are dying, the grass is gone, the ranchers are selling their land. The center of Texas is in a drought that may be the worst in a hundred years.