San Antonio

Food & Drink |
January 21, 2013

The Margarita Variations

On the rocks or frozen? Salt or no salt? And what tequila is best? So many questions, but these four recipes make it easy for you to shake up the best margaritas around.

Food & Drink |
January 21, 2013

Migas

The Dish Once the migas habit takes hold, once you realize you’re held hostage by thoughts of softly scrambled eggs mingled with crisp tortilla strips and onion, tomato, jalapeño, and cheese, you find that neither the blueberry pancakes nor the eggs Benedict you once loved so dearly can touch your

Politics & Policy |
January 20, 2013

Joe Straus III

The ideological pendulum at the Lege is swinging, finally and inevitably, back toward the center, so moderate Republicans—the golden-cheeked warblers of Texas politics—may soon reemerge as a force to be reckoned with. When that happens, we’re betting on this pedigreed, patrician lawmaker from tony District 121 (Alamo Heights, Olmos Park)

Travel & Outdoors |
January 20, 2013

Gruene Peace

A historic dance hall, the cypress-shaded Guadalupe, a couple of rustic inns: A great weekend getaway awaits you less than an hour from Austin and San Antonio.

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

101–125

From John Warne Gates peddling barbed wire in San Antonio to a group of cowboys and ranchers holding the first rodeo in Pecos

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

76–100

From the Great Storm washing ashore in Galveston to Charles Elmer Doolin cooking up the frito in San Antonio

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

101–125

From John Warne Gates peddling barbed wire in San Antonio to a group of cowboys and ranchers holding the first rodeo in Pecos

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

76–100

From the Great Storm washing ashore in Galveston to Charles Elmer Doolin cooking up the frito in San Antonio

Food & Drink |
January 20, 2013

Where to Eat Now 2011

Jalapeño sausage–stuffed quail, lemon-pepper-marinated fried chicken: The trend for most of the best new restaurants last year was comfort food with pizzazz. But then along came Uchiko to wow us with its mouthwatering take on Japanese fusion. Who says you can’t buck a trend?

Food & Drink |
January 20, 2013

Where to Eat Now 2010

You had to be brave to open a restaurant last year. Or you had to be a genius. Or, like Robert Del Grande, whose revamped Houston eatery tops our list of the ten best gastronomical debuts of 2009, you had to be both.

Food & Drink |
January 20, 2013

Let’s Have Mex-Tex

Where’s the best place to get a perfect plate of enchiladas? A chile relleno to die for? A salsa you’ll never forget? Come along on our tour of the fifty greatest Mexican restaurants in Texas, from Hugo’s, in Houston, to Tacos Santa Cecilia, in El Paso. This is not your

Mimi Swartz |
January 20, 2013

Meet the Parent

In the year since my mother died, I’ve learned a lot of things—like how to spend time with my dad.

John Phillip Santos |
January 20, 2013

Two Burials

Today my grandfather is buried in a family plot in Laredo. But to understand who he was and what his family was like, you have to know the story of his first burial, seventy miles away and nearly twenty years earlier.

Music |
January 20, 2013

He’s About A Mover

Country, jazz, blues, R&B, polka, and conjunto—the late, great Doug Sahm was a walking encyclopedia of Texas music. An exclusive excerpt from a new biography explores how he stirred it all together and found his own sound in his first great song.

Feature |
January 20, 2013

2005 Bum Steer Awards

Better close off the balcony too Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, of Houston, requested that a corridor in her Washington, D.C., office building be closed off for eight hours so that she could meet privately with singer Michael Jackson.4—6 minutes to high cholesterol An eighteen-wheeler overturned on Houston’s Loop 610, spilling

Business |
January 20, 2013

Wheels of Fortune

For automakers in the U.S. and overseas, Texas is the very best market for the pickup truck. And for Texans, the pickup truck is the very best vehicle—if only for what it says about who we are. Or who we'd like to be.

Object Lesson |
January 20, 2013

Red McCombs’s Office Mini-Fridge

The word “retirement” isn’t in Billy Joe “Red” McCombs’s vocabulary. The 82-year-old businessman, whose entrepreneurial ventures have ranged from owning car dealerships and the San Antonio Spurs to co-founding media conglomerate Clear Channel Communications, typically works sixty hours a week, Monday through Saturday, at his office in San Antonio.

Art |
January 20, 2013

The Cult of Keen

It took two decades of shows at honky-tonks filled with frat-boy fans and Aggie admirers, but singer-songwriter Robert Earl Keen has his first major-label record deal.

The Culture |
October 31, 2012

The Texanist

What’s the etiquette of political yard signs? Illustration by Jack UnruhQ: My housemate and I have very different political leanings, but we’ve never let this get in the way of our friendship. We have an agree-to-disagree policy. Then, without any discussion, she put a yard

The Wanderer |
September 6, 2012

Choose Your Own Texas Adventure

The first column I wrote for Texas Monthly appeared in the March 2000 issue. The article was titled “Voting Rites,” and I argued that the Voting Rights Act, which Lyndon Johnson had proposed to a joint session of Congress 35 years earlier, was the greatest accomplishment of his presidency. The truth

Art |
June 30, 2012

Guernica Tapestry, San Antonio

The most famous of three tapestry versions of Guernica, Pablo Picasso’s anti-war masterpiece, has found a new home at the San Antonio Museum of Art after being displayed for nearly 25 years at the United Nations headquarters in New York. There, in 2003, officials controversially covered it with a blue curtain during Secretary