Larry McMurtry

larry mcmurtry
McMurtry’s Best

Jun 22, 2016 By Mark Busby

Lonesome Dove aside, here are the indispensable titles every Texan should have on his or her bookshelf.

Larry McMurtry
The Minor Regional Novelist

Jun 22, 2016 By Skip Hollandsworth

Texas may have inspired Larry McMurtry to become a writer, but there is no writer who has inspired an understanding of Texas quite like Larry McMurtry. At age eighty, our most iconic author still has work to do.

McMurtry and Son

Feb 12, 2015 By Christian Wallace

A memorable evening with James and Curtis McMurtry, the son and grandson of Texas’s most-beloved living author.

Small in the Saddle

Oct 13, 2014 By Michael Ennis

Larry McMurtry, Bill Wittliff, and Jeff Guinn turn to familiar turf—the Old West—to challenge old-school readers.

Larry McMurtry Speaks His Mind, Again

Oct 10, 2013 By andrea valdez

Archer City's most famous son tells a writer's group that Blood Meridian "was a little windy" and admits that two of his favorite television shows are The Sopranos and Everybody Loves Raymond.

Katherine the Great

Jan 20, 2013 By Don Graham

Indian Creek native Katherine Anne Porter is the finest author ever to come out of Texas. But only recently has her home state stopped writing her off.

True West

Jan 20, 2013 By John Spong

Twenty-five years ago, Larry McMurtry published a novel called Lonesome Dove—and Texas hasn’t looked the same since. Listen in as more than thirty writers, critics, producers, and actors, from Peter Bogdonavich and Dave Hickey to Tommy Lee Jones, Robert Duvall, and Anjelica Huston, tell the stories behind the book (and the miniseries) that changed the way we see the West.

If you’ve never read or seen Lonesome Dove . . .

Jan 20, 2013 By Texas Monthly

The opening scenes of Lonesome Dove take place at the Hat Creek Cattle Company, a small ranch in Lonesome Dove, Texas, just north of the Rio Grande. Hat Creek is operated by two old Texas Rangers, the taciturn Woodrow Call and the talkative Augustus “Gus” McCrae. Among their hands are…

A Tale Of Two Endings

Jan 20, 2013 By Jeff Salamon

– 1 – Gus and Call’s friendship may be at the heart of Lonesome Dove, but the book’s ending points in another direction. When Call returns to Lonesome Dove after burying Gus, he encounters the town’s barber, Dillard Brawley. “What happened to the saloon?” Call asks, having noticed that the…

Picture Perfect

Jan 20, 2013 By Don Graham

Why Peter Bogdanovich filmed in black and white, who discovered Cybill Shepherd, which onetime soap opera diva read for the role of Jacy, and other secrets of the making of The Last Picture Show .

Catcher in the Raw

Jan 20, 2013 By Don Graham

Forty years after its publication, Horseman, Pass By is still one of Larry McMurtry's finest novels—and as groundbreaking as J. D. Salinger's masterpiece.

Hotels

Jan 20, 2013 By Suzy Banks

Big, breezy porches in Port Aransas, the only heated pool for miles in Marathon: You’ll get more than just a bed and breakfast at these ten appealing places to stay.

The Last Picture Show (1971)

May 31, 2011 By Texas Monthly

Director: Peter BogdanovichPlot: Teenagers come of age in a fading small town. Excerpts from our roundtable discussion: RAPP: Last Picture Show is a documentary of the first twenty years of my life. I watched it again last night, and I’d forgotten just how authentic it is. I…

Return to Splendor

Mar 1, 2005 By Katy Vine

From humble Oak Cliff roots did a hip intellectual giant grow. In this oral history, friends and fans remember the late Grover Lewis, one of the great magazine writers of our day.

Larry McMurtry

Aug 31, 2004 By Evan Smith

“I like to go out at night. I like to sit in a nice room and look at beautiful women. I don't want to just sit on my back porch drinking scotch, and there isn’t much more to do in Archer City.”

Dove Shoot

May 31, 1998 By Anne Dingus

Ten years after the filming of the miniseries Lonesome Dove, screenwriter Bill Wittliff shares his photographic memories of life on the set.

Leavin’ McMurtry

Feb 28, 1974 By Larry L. King

Leaving Cheyenne, which may be Larry McMurtry’s best novel, is made into a miserable movie. This is how it happened.