Mexico

How Safe is Mexico?

Jan 21, 2013 By Jason Cohen

For a third straight year, the Texas Department of Public Safety advised vacationers to stay away from the country, but a Mexican ambassador says the warning has a "clear-cut political agenda."

Life in the “Deadliest Place in Mexico”

Jan 21, 2013 By Sonia Smith

The Texas Observer's Melissa del Bosque traveled to the Juárez Valley, where the murder rate is 1,600 people killed per 100,000 inhabitants, to report on the violent drug war gripping the region. 

Near/Far

Jan 20, 2013 By Nate Blakeslee

Despite rampant fears to the contrary, the bloody drug violence in Mexico hasn’t spilled over into Texas—but that doesn’t mean it’s not transforming life all along the border.

Soldiers of Misfortune

Jan 20, 2013 By Robert Draper

For as long as the U.S. military has patrolled the border in search of drug smugglers, there has been the possibility that an innocent civilian would be killed. The government insists the chance is worth taking. Tell that to the family of Ezequiel Hernandez, Jr.

The Desert of the Dead

Jan 20, 2013 By Pamela Colloff

While politicians and bureaucrats endlessly debate the best ways to secure our borders, undocumented immigrants are dying to get into America—literally.

Coming to America

Jan 20, 2013 By Jordan Breal

Television journalist Jorge Ramos, the author of the book Dying to Cross, on immigration reform and being called the “voice of the voiceless.”

A Good Mango Is Hard to Find

Jan 20, 2013 By John Morthland

Unless you’re Susana Trilling, who taught me how to prepare traditional Oaxacan dishes at her cooking school in Mexico. This month she’ll teach you too—right here in Texas.

Let’s Get Lost

Apr 30, 1999 By Joe Nick Patoski

Hot springs, steep cliffs, death-defying trails: My six-day trek through Mexico’s Copper Canyon was the adventure of a lifetime.

Teenage Wasteland

Jan 1, 1999 By Pamela Colloff

With its optimistically broad streets and oversized cantilevered homes, Plano is the suburban ideal taken to its extreme, and its exaggerated scale often gives rise to exaggerated problems. Heroin addiction is only the latest.

Forget the Alamo

Apr 1, 1998 By Debbie Nathan

Sorry, T. R. Fehrenbach: the new Texas historians don’t care about Davy Crockett or other old icons. To them, the real heroes are women, blacks, and yes, Mexican Americans.

Alamo Tome

Jul 31, 1997 By Anne Dingus

This month Eakin Press will publish The Alamo Almanac and Book of Lists. Among the interesting items compiled by author William R. Chemerka is one that has nothing to do with history—not really, anyway: It’s the Top Twenty Most Frequently Asked Questions at the Alamo. 1. “Where’s the bathroom?” 2.

F. Murray Abraham

Jun 30, 1997 By Renee Boensch

I arrived in El Paso as a small child and grew up within sight of the Rio Grande. Ju�rez was part of our lives, and it was comfortable and easy to cross the border. My friends and I were part of rat packs: We had jackets, and zip guns were…

The Comandante

Jun 30, 1997 By christinebiederman

What does McAllen’s Guillermo González Calderoni know about Mexican political corruption—and when will he start talking?

Sierra High

May 31, 1997 By Carol Flake

High in the Mexican mountains and only a day’s drive from Texas lies El Cielo, a stunning cloud forest where exotic birds soar but the temperature doesn’t.

Shooting on the Border

Jul 31, 1996 By Gregory Curtis

THERE IS AN OBLIGATORY SCENE in every movie about the border between Texas and Mexico: A man draws a line in the dirt with his boot. The line means something different in each movie, and yet, there it is, a narrow little rut in the ground that the characters gesture…

Where the Buys Are

Jun 30, 1996 By Turk Pipkin

If you think there are bargains on the border, you won’t believe what you’ll find seven hundred miles south in three tiny Mexican towns.

The Reel World

Aug 31, 1995 By Turk Pipkin

In Mexico’s Sea of Cortés the bonito, tuna and dorado nearly jump into your boat. No wonder I’m hooked.

Give Me a Job

May 31, 1984 By Tianguis Pérez

In my village in Oaxaca I had heard about those who made it big in El Norte, and I wanted to become one of them. But I didn’t know how hard life in Houston would be without papers, money, or a job.