Galveston

BBQ |
December 8, 2015

In the Land of Links

Hitting the barbecue trail in Texas is something of a weekend sport. Plenty of people create their own routes, but one of the more official itineraries—the Texas Barbecue Trail, which takes you from Taylor to Elgin, Lockhart, and finally through Luling—is enormously popular. As the name suggests it’s a great

The Culture |
March 25, 2015

Where to Go First

Few things make Texans happier than a full tank of gas and an open highway. You’ve got a lot of ground to cover, but I propose you start with these four trips, each originating at Brady, the geographic center of Texas. You’ll be saying “y’all” and offering the hi sign

BBQ |
October 7, 2014

Highway BBQ: Part Three

If you’ve spent any time on the interstates of Texas, you’ve probably seen barbecue restaurants advertised on numerous billboards, blue service signs, or obnoxiously huge structures situated along the access road. Who among hasn’t seen one of those logos and thought, is the food worth stopping for? If a place needs that

Travel & Outdoors |
January 21, 2013

Hotel Galvez, Galveston

Opened in 1911 as a triumphant symbol of Galveston’s rebirth after the devastating 1900 hurricane, the coast’s premier beachfront hotel unveiled an $11 million face-lift last year on the occasion of its hundredth anniversary. So while you’ll find much-needed upgrades throughout, the Queen of the Gulf still radiates the same

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

76–100

From the Great Storm washing ashore in Galveston to Charles Elmer Doolin cooking up the frito in San Antonio

Sports |
January 20, 2013

And Still Champion

The first black man to hold boxing’s heavyweight title is finally getting the respect he deserves. Now all he’s owed is a presidential pardon.

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

51–75

From Donald Chambers founding the Bandidos in Houston to Gordon Granger reading General Orders No. 3 in Galveston

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

76–100

From the Great Storm washing ashore in Galveston to Charles Elmer Doolin cooking up the frito in San Antonio

The Culture |
January 20, 2013

51–75

From Donald Chambers founding the Bandidos in Houston to Gordon Granger reading General Orders No. 3 in Galveston

Food & Drink |
January 20, 2013

Consider the Oyster

If you’re a half shell fanatic like me, you’ll be just as alarmed as I was to hear that oystermen in Galveston Bay—the source of some of the country’s most delicious mollusks —are still struggling to make it after Hurricane Ike.

Health |
January 20, 2013

Get on Board

Michael Hall talks about researching acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), walking the halls of Texas Children’s Hospital, and interviewing the parents of a remarkable skater kid who died.

Health |
January 20, 2013

About a Boy

The short life and tragic death of Johnny Romano, the youngest professional skateboarder ever.

Letter From Galveston |
January 20, 2013

No Man’s Island

A year has passed since Hurricane Ike slammed into Galveston, but my hometown is still reeling from a storm without end.

The Culture |
October 31, 2012

Lisa Cain, Medical School Professor 

Cain, whose official job title is associate professor of neuroscience and cell biology, is a Mississippi native who moved to Texas in 1992. She runs the medical school enrichment courses at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and teaches the core-curriculum course gross anatomy. When she’s not in her lab

The Wanderer |
September 6, 2012

Choose Your Own Texas Adventure

The first column I wrote for Texas Monthly appeared in the March 2000 issue. The article was titled “Voting Rites,” and I argued that the Voting Rights Act, which Lyndon Johnson had proposed to a joint session of Congress 35 years earlier, was the greatest accomplishment of his presidency. The truth