Longreads

Health |
May 31, 1990

Can Kids On Drugs Be Saved?

Drug treatment seldom works: at many centers, greedy entrepreneurs prey on frightened parents and troubled kids. But one teenager’s parents decided to take one last, desperate step: they sent their son to the toughest program in Texas.

Sports |
November 1, 1989

Can’t Win for Losing

When San Antonio’s Memorial Minutemen took on a crosstown rival, all they had to lose was their chance to go down in history as Texas’ worst high school football team.

Business |
September 30, 1989

The Day Leroy Died

When a small private bank was closed on August 7, depositors lost all of their money, a pillar of the community came tumbling down, and the town’s trusting way of life was shattered.

True Crime |
May 31, 1989

The Work of The Devil

The disappearance of a University of Texas student in Matamoros led police to the discovery of a drug-dealing cult whose rituals were not only unholy but unthinkable.

News & Politics |
July 31, 1988

Full of Woe

You see them on TV, adorable youngsters asking to be adopted, But the dreadful odyssey of the Wednesday’s Child rarely has a made-for-television happy ending.

True Crime |
January 1, 1988

The Sins of Walker Railey

He had a wife and a girlfriend. His ambition was unchecked. He tried to commit suicide. But when I came face to face with the minister of my boyhood church, the sin we talked about was murder.

News & Politics |
August 31, 1987

Guilty Until Proven Innocent

In 1980 a white girl was raped and murdered at Conroe High School, and the police quickly arrested a black janitorial supervisor. Now it looks as if the case wasn’t so open and shut after all.

True Crime |
April 1, 1986

Swamp Gas

When Jimmy Lee, an unrepentant troublemaker, felt he had taken one insult too many from the powerful Fredeman family, he called in the law. The results of that action have exposed decades of larceny and corruption in Port Arthur and threaten a Gulf Coast empire.

True Crime |
August 31, 1985

The Final Gun

In a small East Texas town a black principal and a white coach loved the same woman. First came the gossip. Next came the strange letters. And then there was a murder.

Music |
April 30, 1985

The Shaggy Club

In a mixed-up world, mixed-up kids need somebody who really understands. In Dallas that somebody is a punk DJ called Shaggy.

Business |
November 1, 1984

Trashy Business

When Houston’s rich and powerful join forces with environmentalists to battle big corporations, they can be fighting over only one thing. Garbage.

Energy |
October 1, 1984

Feasting on the Oil Glut

So you think that OPEC controls the price of oil and that the glut is hurting everybody in the oil business? Wrong. Traders on the international spot market are pulling the strings and getting rich in the process.

Art |
September 30, 1984

Coppini the Great

Pompeo Coppini’s heroic sculptures and European air were just what Texas’ fledgling gentry was hungry for in 1901. Since then his name has faded from memory, but his works endure.

Border & Immigration |
May 31, 1984

Give Me a Job

In my village in Oaxaca I had heard about those who made it big in El Norte, and I wanted to become one of them. But I didn’t know how hard life in Houston would be without papers, money, or a job.

News & Politics |
May 31, 1984

The Man in the Black Hat

Clinton Manges built his empire on brushland and oil wells, political contributions and lawsuits. His influence extends to the state capitol and oil company boardrooms. To get where he is, he studied under three masters of South Texas.

Business |
May 1, 1984

High Noon at the Circle C

Gary Bradley, a hot young land speculator in Austin, was in the middle of a $50 million deal when he ran into an outraged environmental movement and a lobbyist with some powerful clients. The fight was on.

Politics & Policy |
November 1, 1983

Still on the Case

Assassination buffs come in all shapes and convictions—archivists, technologists, mob-hit theorists, and more—but they are all obsessed with Lee Harvey Oswald, and his crime is the focus of their lives.

Business |
August 31, 1983

The Big Con

From his early days in Big Spring, Eugene Anderson wasn’t what he seemed; neither was the mysterious element he later claimed turned water into fuel.

Health |
July 31, 1983

The Death Shift

The three-to-eleven evening shift, Bexar County Hospital, San Antonio: nurse Genene Jones was on duty in the pediatric intensive care unit, and for months babies kept having mysterious—sometimes fatal—emergencies. Why?

Being Texan |
November 1, 1982

Easy Street

Houston’s black elite have come a very long way to live in MacGregor Way, the swankiest black neighborhood in Texas, but they still don’t feel safe.