February 1997 Issue

Features

The Ice Bats Cometh

Even when they’re not winning games, minor league hockey teams like Austin’s are winning fans by the thousands. Who’d have thought skaters would score in Texas?

Feature

Brenham’s Paradise Lost

An idyllic small town confronts a controversial rape case involving four high school boys and a thirteen-year-old girl and discovers that nothing is certain—except that its children can’t escape the big-city culture of teenage sex.

The Forgotten People

For three centuries the Kickapoo Indians moved from place to place across North America to avoid assimilation. Today they live on the outskirts of Eagle Pass: unwelcome, yet unwilling to give up the fight to preserve their culture.

Reporter

Fratricidal Black Politics

The Houston mayoral election doesn’t occur until November, but the race to succeed Bob Lanier is already the talk of the town. Three blacks would like to be Houston’s first black mayor, and many blacks—among them Houston Chronicle editorial writer James T. Campbell—think that’s two too many. Former top cop

Victor Alfaro

Growing up in Chihuahua, Mexico, Victor Alfaro based his sartorial education on all the American fashion magazines; today the 33-year-old creative director of the New York clothier TSE Cashmere is so busy designing his own line of chic clothes and accessories that he barely has time to read. After a

Bob Schieffer

The day John F. Kennedy was shot, I rushed down to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, where I was the night police reporter, to help answer the phones on the city desk. A woman caller asked, “Is there anyone there who can take me to Dallas?” and I said, “Well, this

Reporter

Good Fella

Now that Joe Chagra is dead, it’s time to clear his name in the 1979 assassination of San Antonio federal judge John Wood.

Art

Ink Big

Drawn by the success of The Simpsons and Beavis and Butt-head, three of Texas’ top cartoonists are going Hollywood. Houston’s Michael Fry, for instance, has sold the television rights to two of his comic strips—Committed and When I Was Short—to production companies in Toronto and Los Angeles, respectively, and both

CD and Book Reviews

Hot CDsMiss Lavelle White’s It Haven’t Been Easy (Antone’s/Discovery) is essentially a primer on modern blues. Houston-bred and currently Austin-based, White is equally comfortable with a soul ballad like the title song, an up-tempo scorcher like “Can’t Take It (I Don’t Give a Damn),” the self-explanatory “Wootie Boogie,” or a

Columns

Mixed Review

Houston has every reason to be proud of the Alley Theatre: After fifty years in the business, it has national clout and a Tony award. Still, not everyone is pleased with its direction.

New Deli

It started as a hippie sandwich shop in Austin. Now, more than two decades later, Schlotzsky’s is finally kicking the competition in the buns.

Behind the Lines

By the Numbers

STEPHEN KLINEBERG IS A MAN WHO REVELS IN STATISTICS, finding a pleasure in them so intense it borders on the sensual. We sat at a small round table in his breakfast room as he led me through the arrays of numbers that he has worked each of the last fifteen

Space Cadet

Painful implants and alien abduction experiences may sound like science fiction, but to San Antonio writer Whitley Strieber, they’re frighteningly real.

True Believer

Few Austin musicians have been as close to stardom, and unable to reach it, as Alejandro Escovedo. But for him, fame has never really been the point.

Miscellany

Last Page

Bill Pickett

What was Bill Pickett’s nickname, and how did he wrestle steers to the ground?

Web

Recipe

Chocolate Mousse Iceberg

Recipe from Lisa Biggerstaff, pastry chef, Dacapo’s on the Parkway, Houston.Mousse9 ounces semisweet chocolate 1 ounces butter, melted 1 pint whipping cream 3 medium eggs 1 1⁄2 teaspoons dark rum 1 tablespoon espresso or strong coffeeMelt chocolate in a double boiler. Melt butter in a pan. Set both aside and

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