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August 1987

Features

The Sleaziest man in Texas

Jul 31, 1987 By Gary Cartwright

The rich and eccentric heir to a rich and Galveston family, Shearn Moody, Jr., craved an empire all his own. But his lack of self-restraint cost him his bank, his insurance company, his fortune, and now, perhaps, his freedom.

Columns

Subjects of the Realm

Jul 31, 1987 By Michael Ennis

Hans Holbein’s life drawings are a tantalizing glumpse into the lusty court of Henry VIII. And courtesy of HRH Queen Elizabeth II, they’re on view at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts.

Miscellany

State Secrets

Jul 31, 1987 By Paul Burka

Playing fast and loose with the new speed limit; an oil drilling technique gets the shaft; dam builders strick back—with Authority; how the budget battle is changing the Legislature.

The National Tour of Texas

Jul 31, 1987 By Dick Reavis

Passing (slowly) through Kendleton. Then on to Houston, where student murals record the march of time and Vietnam vets gather; to a meal so good it’s kept under lock and key; and finally to the (formerly) Golden Triangle.

Reporter

Texas Monthly Reporter

Jul 31, 1987 By Alison Cook

Let’s play pretend by swapping out Houstonians for Dallasites. Plus: Battling books, good Mex-Mex where you’d least expect it, and our guide to the latest legislative phrases (use ‘em three times and they’re yours!)