April 1989

Features

Feature
Beyond the Blues

Apr 1, 1989 By Jody Denberg

The unlikely twosome of eccentric rocker Doug Sahm and blues champion Clifford Antone has rescued from obscurity a distinctively rhythmic, indisputably raunchy regional sound.

Don’t Call Him Junior

Apr 1, 1989 By Patricia Kilday Hart

George W. Bush wants to be governor of Texas. He says he’s not following in his father’s footsteps, but his name, his career, and his ideas about politics seem an awful lot like Dad’s.

Feature
Side By Side

Apr 1, 1989 By Dick Reavis

Among the harsh mountains of Chihuahua, Mennonite immigrants and Tarahumara Indians maintain their ancient ways.

Feature
Poisoned By Their Own Home

Apr 1, 1989 By Tom Curtis

When the St. Johns returned to their house after having it sprayed for bugs, they discovered why those friendly pest-control people are called exterminators.

Eat Sweet

Apr 1, 1989 By Anne Dingus

Peanut patties are red, raspas are blue, sugar is sweet, and so are pralines, pecan pie, kolaches, and seven other great Texas desserts.

Feature
Abortion Street

Jan 20, 2013 By Mimi Swartz

Sixteen years after Roe v. Wade, all the bitterness and horror of the abortion fight can be found at a single site in Dallas.

Columns

Lifestyle
Living With the Bomb

Apr 1, 1989 By georgetoomer

As a teenager, I dreamed of the ultimate hot rod. Then I woke up to find I owned the ugliest car in the world.

Art
A Developing Art

Apr 1, 1989 By Michael Ennis

The current show at Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts brings 150 years of photography into sharp focus.

Miscellany

State Secrets
Animal House

Apr 1, 1989 By Paul Burka

The Aggies’ vet school is going to the dogs; picture-perfect rivalry in the governor’s race; Lloyd Bentsen wants more money from Texas; New York takeover toughs establish an outpost in Houston.

Reporter

Reporter
Red Sails in the Sunbelt

Apr 1, 1989 By Tom Curtis

Windsurfers add sparkle to Corpus Christi Bay; the Johnson family says a poignant farewell to one of its own; the golden arches attain alpine heights—but come crashing down in Houston.