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January 1987

Features

1987 Bum Steer Awards

Jan 1, 1987 By Texas Monthly

A year of anguished Arabs, bigshot bankrupts, crazy cookbooks, despoiled dinosaurs, exhibitionist editors, foiled fugitives, greens-eating graduates, half-cocked hashish, in flagrante inmates, jolly jailers, kinky kilocycles, late lobsters, moistened mayors, and northbound Nicaraguans.

No Promises

Jan 1, 1987 By Mimi Swartz

I arrived in Houston at the height of the boom, and left just as the bust began. Along the way I learned what it means to grow up.

Total Hit

Jan 1, 1987 By Gary Cartwright

One morning last August, a San Antonio patrolman told his superior officer that his best friend was a killer cop. By that afternoon, the killer cop was dead, the patrolman was claiming self-defense, and a city infamous for strange killings was in the midst of one of the strangest of all.

Miscellany

State Secrets

Jan 1, 1987 By Patricia Hart

A gloomy prediction for Texas banks; the oil crisis becomes a steel crisis; how Lloyd Bentsen’s new chairmanship can help Texas.

The Quidnunc

Jan 1, 1987 By Mark Seal

Celebrating the Day of the Dead with David Byrne; digging for Texas dirt with snoop queen Kitty Kelley; playing nuclear war games in San Antonio.

Columns

Reporter

Texas Monthly Reporter

Jan 1, 1987 By Peter Elkind

The citizens of Muleshoe lose their only hospital, thanks to a California chain; the citizens of Houston learn the value of caution, thanks to a local developer; the citizens of the world get a chance to improve their potency, thanks to the Aggies.